Swarupanand

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Shri Swami Swarupanand Ji
Nangli Nivasi Bhagwan.jpg
Portrait of Swarupanand Ji
Born 1 February 1884
Teri, Pakistan
Died 9 April 1936(1936-04-09) (aged 52)
Raipur Nangli, Muzaffarnagar
Website www.nanglisahib.com
www.nanglitirath.com

Born Shri Beli Ram Ji, Shri Swami Swarupanand ji Maharaj (1 February 1884 – 9 April 1936), was an Indian Guru of Shri Paramhans Advait Mat lineage. He was also known as "Shri Nangli Niwasi Bhagwaan Ji", as "Hari Har Baba" and as "Second Guru".[1]

Born in village Teri in Kohat district, India (now in Pakistan), the young Beli Ram Ji was initiated into the sanyasas in the early 1900s in Teri by Shri Swami Advaitanand Ji, who named him Shri Swami Swarupanand Ji. During Swami Advaitanand ji's life, Swami Swarupanand ji created an order of sannyasins (or renunciates) in northern India and founded several centers with the purpose of disseminating his master's teachings.[2]

The First Guru asked him to meditate in Agra, with the object that Second Guru preserve the spiritual power to be utilised in future as the reformer of the spiritual Age.Far away from town in a jungle under the Neem Tree the Second Guru, absorbed in his own ecstasy, roamed in quite a different world in a gufa( a very tight cave 3-4 feet under the land). Many residents of Agra, who were totally unaware of his name and whereabouts, felt attracted by him and placed some eatables near his seat with a thought he might accept them. But the Yogeshwar, the Second Guru, had no affinity for eating/drinking. He used to eat only boiled neem leaves. As such his divine body reduced to skelton. In 1935, he moved from Punjab to Delhi. He left this world a year later on 9 April 1936 in the village of Nangli, near Meerut.[3]

On Thursday, the 2nd October 1919 A.D. i.e. 16th Asuj, 1976 Bikrami, all the followers and devotees applied Saffron (Tilak) to the forehead of Shri Shri 108 Shri Swami Swarup Anand Ji Maharaj, in recognition of His having succeeded to the spiritual throne (Gaddi) as the Second Master. All performed 'Arti' and 'Puja' and a Bhandara (free grand feast) was also arranged on the same day.


On 8th April, the Second Master asked Bhagat Ainshi a Ji (Later Mahatma Param Dharma Anand Ji) to prepare a new bed for Him and desired, that that Should be done that very day. He did as the Master desired. Then that heart-rending day approached near, which was expected by none. About this day, the Second Master had not only given mere indications, but had even clearly informed the people, but they Could not grasp that. Night approached to wind up the Divine rays of the sun of knowledge. That was not a usual night. That was a night, which was to leave behind its mark on the hearts of the devotees. The day, Which Could not even be conceived of, actually came. At night the Master took a little food. Then He said to the devotees in His personal service I have to go in the morning. You People Sit outside the room. I will call YOU, when needed." One of the Mahatmas in His personal service requested, "Lord! You are saying that you would go in the morning. What should be prepared for breakfast, and also for the journey?" But the Master smilingly replied that they would be informed to go and rest at the proper time and that they should.

That heart-rending day of 9th April dawned, when the Lord of the world, who always responded to the inner prayers of the devotees, threw them in permanent grief by His departure to His heavenly abode. The Master got up at 4.00 A. M. and sat on His 'Palang' (cot). Sewadars (devotees in personal service) were called in. He looked at them affectionately, blessed them and said,

"Very well, sit outside. I have to go after an hour or two." All of them went outside the room. The Master, having closed the door, sat in 'Padama Aasana' for meditation. It was about 5.00 A. M. at that time. A lot of time passed, yet the sewadars (personal attendants) were awaiting a call from the Master, but there was none. Hour after hour lapsed in that way, when all of them, somehow, felt a particular unrest within. In the meantime Bhagat Harnam Singh Ji (Mahatma Puran Shardha Anand Ji) came and said that he had kept the car ready and he might be summoned, whenever the Master desired.

On the other hand, the Second Master had gone into such a meditation from which there was no return. The hearts of the sewadars were getting restless as to why they had not been summoned till then? They would sometimes peep through the crevices ill the doors, but could not gather the courage to go in. How could they know that they would riot hear His voice again? At last after long waiting, at about 8. 00 A. M when their patience had been exhausted and broken all the bounds, the sewadars opened the door and went in and bowed to the Master. When they touched the Master's feet they felt that they were cold. They thought that the Master was enjoying the bliss of deep meditation (Samadhi)or the Master's body must have caught chill. They covered the Master's feet with a shawl and waited. Their restlessness and anxiety had crossed its limits. After some time they again examined and found His feet still cold. It was a great surprise that neither the Master's body changed its colour nor any wrinkle was visible on His forehead. There was a sweet smile playing on His bewitching face. It appeared as if the Master was enjoying limitless bliss in His trance. After some more findings, it was discovered that the soul had ebbed out of the topmost portion of the skull and had reached its original home. At this all the sewadars started crying. None was able to speak.

All the devotees of the village gathered there. All were weeping bitterly. None had the courage to disclose that the Master had gone into eternal trance and that He had cast off. His gross body of His own accord. The devotees then realised that the Master was saying that He was to go on 9th April. What He meant thereby, was this endless journey. Thus Shri Shri 108 Shri Paramhansa Maharaj Ji, the Second Master, the Second presiding Lord of the Advait Mat, left for His heavenly abode on Thursday, the 9th April, 1936 A. D. or 18th Chet, 1993 B. K. on Vaishakli, Badi Dooj, after blessing every one with the treasure of Bhakti.

Some sewadars went to Meerut and telegraphically conveyed the sad news to Chakatiri Sant Ashrama' and other various Ashramas, such as Shri Anandpur in Gwalior State, Lakki Marwat, Teri and the Ashramas in all the small and big cities of India, as well as, to the Mahatmas, Bais and Bhagats in different towns and cities etc. All the devotees were grief-stricken. Whosoever heard it, became unconscious. All the Mahatmas and devotees reached Nangli Sahib with utmost grief in their mind.

All were surprised to see that till then there was freshness on the body and a smile on the lips of the Master. From the face of the Master it appeared as if He was about to say something. But those lips were not to move. The Great Sun of spiritual knowledge had set. The darkness of Amavasya, caused by the departure of the Master, spread in all directions. Shri Swami Vairag Anand Ji Maharaj (The Third Master) and Mahatma Nij Atma Anand Ji from Chakauri and Shri Swami Beant Anand Ji (The Fourth Master) from Shri Anandpur reached there on 10th April. Similarly all others, as they got the sad news, hurried to Nangli Sahib. In the evening of Saturday, the 11th April, the Master was dressed in new clothes and His 'Aarti' was performed.

After that His body was laid in Maha-samadhi the same evening in the right hand room, as was desired by Him. None could stop the stream of tears rolling down their cheeks. On Vaishakhi, the 13th April, 1936 A.D. according to old tradition, Bhandara (Common Langar) was arranged in His sacred memory.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shri Paramhansa Advait Mat: A life sketch of the Illustrious Master of the Mat (1975), p. 145–46, Shri Anandpur Trust
  2. ^ Sri Swami Sar Shabdanand Ji, Shri Swarup Darshan (1998), pp. 17–59. New Delhi: Sar Shabd Mission.
  3. ^ Vaudeville, Charlotte. Sant Mat: Studies in a Devotional Tradition in India in Schomer, K. and McLeod, W. ISBN 0-9612208-0-5