Sweden men's national ice hockey team

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Sweden
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Tre Kronor (Three Crowns)
Association Swedish Ice Hockey Association
General Manager Tommy Boustedt
Head coach Pär Mårts
Assistants Rikard Grönborg
Peter Popovic
Captain Staffan Kronwall
Most games Jörgen Jönsson (285)[1]
Most points Sven Tumba (186)[1]
IIHF code SWE
IIHF ranking 3 Decrease2
Highest IIHF ranking 1 (first in 2006)
Lowest IIHF ranking 4 (2012)
Team colors          
Sweden national hockey team jerseys - 2014 Winter Olympics.png
First international
 Sweden 8–0 Belgium 
(Antwerp, Belgium; 23 April 1920)[2]
Biggest win
 Sweden 24–1 Belgium 
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 16 February 1947)[2]
 Sweden 23–0 Italy 
(St. Moritz, Switzerland; 7 February 1948)[3]
Biggest defeat
 Canada 22–0 Sweden 
(Chamonix, France; 29 January 1924)[2]
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 63 (first in 1920)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg (1953, 1957, 1962, 1987, 1991, 1992, 1998, 2006, 2013)
IIHF European Championship
Appearances 12
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg (1921, 1923, 1932)
Olympics
Appearances 21 (first in 1920)
Medals

Gold medal.svg Gold (1994, 2006)
Silver medal.svg Silver (1928, 1964, 2014)

Bronze medal.svg Bronze (1952, 1980, 1984, 1988)
International record (W–L–T)
1067–657–165
Medal record
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1994 Lillehammer Team
Gold medal – first place 2006 Turin Team
Silver medal – second place 1928 St. Moritz Team
Silver medal – second place 1964 Innsbruck Team
Silver medal – second place 2014 Sochi Team
Bronze medal – third place 1952 Oslo Team
Bronze medal – third place 1980 Lake Placid Team
Bronze medal – third place 1984 Sarajevo Team
Bronze medal – third place 1988 Calgary Team
World Championship
Gold medal – first place 1953 Switzerland Team
Gold medal – first place 1957 Russia Team
Gold medal – first place 1962 USA Team
Gold medal – first place 1987 Austria Team
Gold medal – first place 1991 Finland Team
Gold medal – first place 1992 Czechoslovakia Team
Gold medal – first place 1998 Switzerland Team
Gold medal – first place 2006 Latvia Team
Gold medal – first place 2013 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1947 Czechoslovakia Team
Silver medal – second place 1951 France Team
Silver medal – second place 1963 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1967 Austria Team
Silver medal – second place 1969 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1970 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1973 Russia Team
Silver medal – second place 1977 Austria Team
Silver medal – second place 1981 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1986 Russia Team
Silver medal – second place 1990 Switzerland Team
Silver medal – second place 1993 Germany Team
Silver medal – second place 1995 Sweden Team
Silver medal – second place 1997 Finland Team
Silver medal – second place 2003 Finland Team
Silver medal – second place 2004 Czech Republic Team
Silver medal – second place 2011 Slovakia Team
Bronze medal – third place 1954 Sweden Team
Bronze medal – third place 1958 Norway Team
Bronze medal – third place 1965 Finland Team
Bronze medal – third place 1971 Switzerland Team
Bronze medal – third place 1972 Czechoslovakia Team
Bronze medal – third place 1974 Finland Team
Bronze medal – third place 1975 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 1976 Poland Team
Bronze medal – third place 1979 Russia Team
Bronze medal – third place 1994 Italy Team
Bronze medal – third place 1999 Norway Team
Bronze medal – third place 2001 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 2002 Sweden Team
Bronze medal – third place 2009 Switzerland Team
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Germany Team
Bronze medal – third place 2014 Belarus Team

The Sweden men's national ice hockey team, or Tre Kronor (Three Crowns in Swedish), as it is called in Sweden, is one of the most successful ice hockey teams in the world. The team is controlled by the Swedish Ice Hockey Association, and it is considered a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia and the United States.[4]

The name Tre Kronor means "Three Crowns" and refers to the three crowns on the team jersey. The three crowns represent the lesser national coat of arms of the Kingdom of Sweden and the national emblem. The first time the symbol was used on the national teams jersey was on 12 February 1938, during the World Championships in Prague.[5]

The team has won numerous medals at both the World Championships and the Winter Olympics. In 2006, they became the first, and so far only, team to win both tournaments in the same calendar year, by winning the 2006 Winter Olympics in a thrilling final against Finland by 3–2, and the 2006 World Championships by beating Czech Republic in the final, 4–0.[6] In 2013 the team was the first team to win the World Championships at home since the Soviet Union in 1986.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

Year Result
1920 4th place
1924 4th place
1928  Silver
1936 5th place
1948 4th place
1952  Bronze
1956 4th place
1960 5th place
1964  Silver
1968 4th place
1972 4th place
1980  Bronze
1984  Bronze
1988  Bronze
1992 5th place
1994  Gold
1998 5th place
2002 5th place
2006  Gold
2010 5th place
2014  Silver
Totals
Games Gold Silver Bronze Total
21 2 3 4 9

World Championship[edit]

  • 1931 – 6th place
  • 1935 – 5th place
  • 1937 – 10th place
  • 1938 – 5th place
  • 1947 –  Silver
  • 1949 – 4th place
  • 1950 – 5th place
  • 1951 –  Silver
  • 1953 Gold
  • 1954 –  Bronze
  • 1955 – 5th place
  • 1957 Gold
  • 1958 –  Bronze
  • 1959 – 5th place
  • 1961 – 4th place
  • 1962 –  Gold
  • 1963 –  Silver
  • 1965 Bronze
  • 1966 – 4th place
  • 1967 –  Silver
  • 1969 –  Silver
  • 1970 –  Silver
  • 1971 –  Bronze
  • 1972 –  Bronze
  • 1973 Silver
  • 1974 Bronze
  • 1975 Bronze
  • 1976 Bronze
  • 1977 Silver
  • 1978 – 4th place
  • 1979 Bronze
  • 1981 Silver
  • 1982 – 4th place
  • 1983 – 4th place
  • 1985 – 6th place
  • 1986 Silver
  • 1987 Gold
  • 1989 – 4th place
  • 1990 Silver
  • 1991 Gold
  • 1992 Gold
  • 1993 Silver
  • 1994 Bronze
  • 1995 Silver
  • 1996 – 5th place
  • 1997 Silver
  • 1998 Gold
  • 1999 Bronze
  • 2000 – 7th place
  • 2001 Bronze
  • 2002 Bronze
  • 2003 Silver
  • 2004 Silver
  • 2005 – 4th place
  • 2006 Gold
  • 2007 – 4th place
  • 2008 – 4th place
  • 2009 Bronze
  • 2010 Bronze
  • 2011 Silver
  • 2012 – 6th place
  • 2013 Gold
  • 2014 Bronze
  • 2015 – 5th place

Canada Cup[edit]

  • 1976 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1981 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1984 Silver
  • 1987 Bronze
  • 1991 – Finished in 4th place

World Cup[edit]

  • 1996 – lost semi-finals
  • 2004 – lost quarter-finals

European Championship[edit]

  • 1921 –  Gold
  • 1922 –  Silver
  • 1923 –  Gold
  • 1924 –  Silver
  • 1932 –  Gold

All-time team record[edit]

The following table shows Sweden's all-time international record in official matches (WC, OG, EC), correct as of 10 June 2013.[7]

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA
 Austria 16 12 2 2 76 11
 Belarus 9 8 0 1 35 17
 Belgium 3 3 0 0 41 2
 Canada 79 29 6 44 210 308
 Czech Republic 20 13 0 7 57 39
 Denmark 8 8 0 0 46 13
 Finland 75 43 15 17 279 180
 France 15 13 0 2 72 18
 Germany 15 13 1 1 68 23
 Great Britain 9 5 0 4 42 19
 Hungary 1 1 0 0 3 0
 Italy 18 15 3 0 122 25
 Japan 4 4 0 0 44 1
 Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0 7 2
 Latvia 12 10 1 1 53 18
 Netherlands 2 2 0 0 16 0
 Norway 17 15 1 1 97 25
 Poland 28 23 2 3 192 46
 Romania 4 4 0 0 35 4
 Russia 19 8 1 10 51 61
 Slovakia 11 4 2 5 31 28
 Slovenia 2 2 0 0 10 2
  Switzerland 45 34 5 6 241 87
 Ukraine 5 5 0 0 26 6
 United States 67 44 7 16 302 195
 Czechoslovakia 74 27 11 36 193 206
 East Germany 16 15 0 1 110 29
 Soviet Union 58 7 8 43 118 279
 West Germany 35 30 2 1 190 57
 Yugoslavia 2 2 0 0 19 1

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2015 IIHF World Championship.[8]

Head coach: Pär Mårts

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Enroth, JhonasJhonas Enroth 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 700175000000000000075 kg (165 lb) (1988-06-25) June 25, 1988 (age 27) United States Dallas Stars
3 D Klingberg, JohnJohn Klingberg 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 700182000000000000082 kg (181 lb) (1992-08-14) August 14, 1992 (age 22) United States Dallas Stars
4 D Kronwall, StaffanStaffan KronwallC 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 7002105000000000000105 kg (231 lb) (1982-09-10)September 10, 1982 (aged 32) Russia Lokomotiv Yaroslavl
8 D Granberg, PetterPetter Granberg 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 700193000000000000093 kg (205 lb) (1992-08-27)August 27, 1992 (aged 22) Canada Toronto Maple Leafs
9 F Forsberg, FilipFilip Forsberg 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 700194000000000000094 kg (207 lb) (1994-08-13)August 13, 1994 (aged 20) United States Nashville Predators
10 F Lindström, JoakimJoakim Lindström 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 700185000000000000085 kg (187 lb) (1983-12-05)December 5, 1983 (aged 31) Canada Toronto Maple Leafs
11 F Hjalmarsson, SimonSimon Hjalmarsson 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 700178000000000000078 kg (172 lb) (1989-02-01)February 1, 1989 (aged 26) Russia CSKA Moscow
14 D Ekholm, MattiasMattias Ekholm 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 700193000000000000093 kg (205 lb) (1990-05-24)May 24, 1990 (aged 24) United States Nashville Predators
15 F Sjögren, MattiasMattias Sjögren 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 700197000000000000097 kg (214 lb) (1987-11-27)November 27, 1987 (aged 27) Sweden Linköpings HC
16 F Josefson, JacobJacob Josefson 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 700186000000000000086 kg (190 lb) (1991-03-02)March 2, 1991 (aged 24) United States New Jersey Devils
20 F Lundqvist, JoelJoel LundqvistA 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 700191000000000000091 kg (201 lb) (1982-03-02)March 2, 1982 (aged 33) Sweden Frölunda HC
21 F Eriksson, LouiLoui Eriksson 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 700189000000000000089 kg (196 lb) (1985-07-17)July 17, 1985 (aged 29) United States Boston Bruins
23 D Ekman-Larsson, OliverOliver Ekman-Larsson 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 700191000000000000091 kg (201 lb) (1991-07-17)July 17, 1991 (aged 23) United States Arizona Coyotes
27 F Ericsson, JimmieJimmie EricssonA 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in) 700194000000000000094 kg (207 lb) (1980-02-22)February 22, 1980 (aged 35) Russia SKA Saint Petersburg
28 F Lindholm, EliasElias Lindholm 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 700187000000000000087 kg (192 lb) (1994-12-02) December 2, 1994 (age 20) United States Carolina Hurricanes
31 G Nilsson, AndersAnders Nilsson 1.95 m (6 ft 5 in) 7002103000000000000103 kg (227 lb) (1990-03-19) March 19, 1990 (age 25) Russia Ak Bars Kazan
35 G Svensson, MarkusMarkus Svensson 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 700189000000000000089 kg (196 lb) (1984-07-09) July 9, 1984 (age 31) Sweden Skellefteå AIK
44 F Danielsson, NicklasNicklas Danielsson 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 700183000000000000083 kg (183 lb) (1984-12-07) December 7, 1984 (age 30) Switzerland Rapperswil-Jona Lakers
45 F Möller, OscarOscar Möller 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 700182000000000000082 kg (181 lb) (1989-01-22) January 22, 1989 (age 26) Russia Ak Bars Kazan
48 D Rahimi, DanielDaniel Rahimi 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 700195000000000000095 kg (209 lb) (1987-04-28) April 28, 1987 (age 28) Sweden Linköpings HC
49 F Rask, VictorVictor Rask 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 700191000000000000091 kg (201 lb) (1993-03-01) March 1, 1993 (age 22) United States Carolina Hurricanes
51 D Ahnelöv, JonasJonas Ahnelöv 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 700197000000000000097 kg (214 lb) (1987-12-11) December 11, 1987 (age 27) Sweden Modo Hockey
53 F Thuresson, AndreasAndreas Thuresson 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 700192000000000000092 kg (203 lb) (1987-11-18) November 18, 1987 (age 27) Russia Severstal Cherepovets
58 F Lander, AntonAnton Lander 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 700185000000000000085 kg (187 lb) (1991-04-24) April 24, 1991 (age 24) Canada Edmonton Oilers
84 D Klefbom, OscarOscar Klefbom 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 700195000000000000095 kg (209 lb) (1993-07-20) July 20, 1993 (age 22) Canada Edmonton Oilers

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Includes Professional ice hockey world championships and the 1998 and 2002 Olympics only.
  2. ^ a b c Includes Olympics, World Championships, World Cups, Canada Cups and Summit Series.
  3. ^ http://library.la84.org/6oic/OfficialReports/1948/ORW1948.pdf
  4. ^ "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  5. ^ Feltenmark, Anders. "Tre Kronor en poppis 69-åring" (PDF) (in Swedish). Swedish Ice Hockey Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-21. 
  6. ^ "Sweden complete golden double". Eurosport. 2006-05-21. Archived from the original on 2006-10-09. Retrieved 2006-05-21. 
  7. ^ http://swehockey.se/ImageVault/Images/id_74/ImageVaultHandler.aspx
  8. ^ 2015 Roster

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Tomas Johansson
Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal
with
Marie-Helene Westin

1987
Succeeded by
Tomas Gustafson