Sweden women's national ice hockey team

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Sweden
Nickname(s)Damkronorna (The Lady Crowns)
AssociationSvenska Ishockeyförbundet
Head coachYlva Martinsen
AssistantsAlexander Broms
Oscar Dahlgren
CaptainEmma Nordin
Most gamesGunilla Andersson (297)
Most pointsErika Holst (202)
Team colors         
IIHF codeSWE
Sweden national hockey team jerseys - 2014 Winter Olympics.png
Ranking
Current IIHF7 Decrease 1 (14 April 2019)[1]
Highest IIHF2 (2007)
Lowest IIHF7 (2019)
First international
United States  10–0  Sweden
(North York or Mississauga, Canada; 22 April 1987)
Biggest win
Sweden  17–0  Norway
(Haninge, Sweden; 18 March 2000)
Biggest defeat
Canada  15–1  Sweden
(Ottawa, Canada; 19 March 1990)
World Championships
Appearances19 (first in 1990)
Best result3rd, bronze medalist(s) (2005, 2007)
European Championships
Appearances5 (first in 1989)
Best result1st, gold medalist(s) (1996)
Olympics
Appearances6 (first in 1998)
MedalsSilver medal.svg Silver (2006)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze (2002)
International record (W–L–T)
168–181–17
Medal record
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 2006 Turin Team
Bronze medal – third place 2002 Salt Lake City Team
IIHF World Women's Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2005 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 2007 Canada
IIHF European Women Championships
Gold medal – first place 1996 Russia
Silver medal – second place 1989 West Germany
Silver medal – second place 1991 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1993 Denmark
Silver medal – second place 1995 Latvia

The Swedish women's national ice hockey team (Swedish: Sveriges damlandslag i ishockey) or Damkronorna ("the Lady Crowns" in Swedish) represents Sweden at the International Ice Hockey Federation's IIHF World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by Svenska Ishockeyförbundet. Sweden has 3,425 female players in 2011.[2]

History[edit]

The Swedish team had traditionally been the fourth-best women's team in the world, behind Canada, USA and Finland. During the 1997 World Championship, Sweden qualified for the 1998 Olympic tournament in Nagano, ending up 5th.[3] However, the team has shown steady improvement since 2001, winning bronze medals at the 2002 Winter Olympics, the 2005 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, and the 2007 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, and a silver medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics. On 31 August 2011, Canada was bested by Sweden for just the second time in 66 all-time international meetings. Canada suffered from a 4–1 second-period deficit and lost by a 6–4 score. The current head coach is Ylva Martinsen, who was hired to replace Leif Boork in 2019. On 9 April 2019, at the 2019 World Championship in Espoo, Finland, they lost to Japan 3–2. Sweden has relegated to Division I for the first time in Women's Worlds history.[4]

Records[edit]

  • Sweden is the first country in the history of the sport other than Canada and the United States to compete in the finals of any international women's hockey tournament.
  • On 7 November 2008, in Lake Placid, Sweden defeated Canada for the first time in women's ice hockey with the 2–1 win in overtime at 4 Nations Cup.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

  • 1998 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2002Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2006Won silver medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 2010 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2014 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2018 – Finished in 7th place

World Championship[edit]

  • 1990 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1992 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1994 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1997 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2000 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2001 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2004 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2005Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2007Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2008 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2011 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2013 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2015 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2016 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2017 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2019 – Finished in 9th place (relegated to Division IA)
  • 2020

European Championship[edit]

  • 1989 – Won silver medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 1991 – Won silver medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 1993 – Won silver medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 1995 – Won silver medal Silver medal icon.svg
  • 1996 – Won gold medal Gold medal icon.svg

3/4 Nations Cup[edit]

  • 2000 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2001 – Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg (3 Nations Cup)
  • 2002 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2003 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2004 – Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2005 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2006Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2007 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2008Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2009Won bronze medal Bronze medal icon.svg
  • 2010 – Finished in 4th place

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship.[5][6]

Head Coach: Ylva Lindberg

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Sara Grahn 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1988-09-25) 25 September 1988 (age 31) Sweden Luleå HF
3 D Mina Waxin 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (2001-04-29) 29 April 2001 (age 18) Sweden Modo Hockey
4 D Sofia Engström 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1988-07-03) 3 July 1988 (age 31) Sweden Leksands IF
5 D Johanna Fällman 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (1990-06-21) 21 June 1990 (age 29) Sweden Luleå HF
6 D Josefin HolmgrenA 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 73 kg (161 lb) (1993-04-11) 11 April 1993 (age 26) Sweden Djurgårdens IF Hockey
7 D Johanna Olofsson 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1991-07-13) 13 July 1991 (age 28) Sweden Modo Hockey
9 D Jessica Adolfsson 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 74 kg (163 lb) (1998-07-15) 15 July 1998 (age 21) United States Penn State Univ.
12 D Maja Nylén Persson 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (2000-11-20) 20 November 2000 (age 18) Sweden Leksands IF
14 F Sabina Küller 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1994-09-22) 22 September 1994 (age 25) Sweden AIK IF
15 F Lisa Johansson 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 59 kg (130 lb) (1992-04-11) 11 April 1992 (age 27) Sweden AIK IF
16 F Pernilla Winberg 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1989-02-24) 24 February 1989 (age 30) Sweden Linköpings HC
19 F Sara Hjalmarsson 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (1998-02-08) 8 February 1998 (age 21) United States Providence College
20 F Fanny Rask 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 66 kg (146 lb) (1991-05-21) 21 May 1991 (age 28) Sweden HV71
21 F Isabell Palm 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1995-10-13) 13 October 1995 (age 24) Sweden HV71
22 F Lina Ljungblom 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (2001-10-15) 15 October 2001 (age 18) Sweden HV71
24 F Erika GrahmA 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1991-01-26) 26 January 1991 (age 28) Sweden Brynäs IF
25 F Melinda Olsson 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 85 kg (187 lb) (1992-09-09) 9 September 1992 (age 27) Sweden Luleå HF
26 F Hanna Olsson 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1999-01-20) 20 January 1999 (age 20) Sweden Skärgårdens SK
27 F Emma NordinC 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1991-03-22) 22 March 1991 (age 28) Sweden Luleå HF
28 F Sofie Lundin 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 19) Sweden Djurgårdens IF Hockey
29 F Olivia Carlsson 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 74 kg (163 lb) (1995-03-02) 2 March 1995 (age 24) Sweden Modo Hockey
30 G Julia Åberg 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (1996-07-12) 12 July 1996 (age 23) Sweden Leksands IF
35 G Lovisa Selander 1.81 m (5 ft 11 in) 73 kg (161 lb) (1996-03-14) 14 March 1996 (age 23) United States RPI

Famous players[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IIHF Women's World Ranking". IIHF. 14 April 2019. Retrieved 14 April 2019.
  2. ^ Profile
  3. ^ Andria Hunter (1998). "Women's Hockey in Sweden". Women's Hockey Web. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  4. ^ Lucas Aykroyd (9 April 2019). "Japan's sun shines - Sweden relegated!". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  5. ^ "Damkronornas trupp uttagen till VM". swehockey.se. 19 March 2019.
  6. ^ 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship roster
  7. ^ Collins gem Hockey Facts and Stats 2009–10, p. 545, Andrew Podnieks, Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-1-55468-621-6.

External links[edit]