Swedesboro, New Jersey

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Swedesboro, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Swedesboro
Map of Swedesboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Swedesboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Swedesboro, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Swedesboro, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°44′45″N 75°18′39″W / 39.745884°N 75.310947°W / 39.745884; -75.310947Coordinates: 39°44′45″N 75°18′39″W / 39.745884°N 75.310947°W / 39.745884; -75.310947[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated April 9, 1902
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Thomas W. Fromm (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Tanya Goodwin[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 0.758 sq mi (1.964 km2)
 • Land 0.724 sq mi (1.876 km2)
 • Water 0.034 sq mi (0.088 km2)  4.49%
Area rank 526th of 566 in state
24th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 2,584
 • Estimate (2014)[10] 2,623
 • Rank 467th of 566 in state
22nd of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 3,568.4/sq mi (1,377.8/km2)
 • Density rank 181st of 566 in state
4th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08085[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 Exchanges: 241, 467[14]
FIPS code 3401571850[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885415[1][17]
Website www.historicswedesboro.com

Swedesboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,584,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 529 (+25.7%) from the 2,055 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 31 (+1.5%) from the 2,024 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Swedesboro was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 9, 1902, from portions of Woolwich Township.[19]

Swedesboro has been recognized by the National Arbor Day Foundation as a Tree City USA since 2000.[20]

History[edit]

Tomato shipping in yard at Swedesboro, 1912

Swedesboro was settled as part of New Sweden in the mid-1600s. The early Swedes and Finns were fishermen, hunters and farmers.

The English Colonial government needed a road between the communities of Burlingtown and Salem, so they built the Kings Highway in 1691 which opened the southern portion of Gloucester County to more settlers, who were drawn to the area by the fertile sandy soil, prime farmland and vast tracts of oak, birch, maple and pine trees. Originally, the community was called Raccoon, until the name was changed to Swedesboro in 1765.[21]

Old Swede's Church (Holy Trinity) in Swedesboro, New Jersey

Swedesboro, along with Bridgeport, was one of only two settlements established in New Jersey as a part of the New Sweden colony. The oldest extant log cabin in the United States, the Nothnagle Log Cabin (ca. 1640) was built by Antti Niilonpoika (Anthony Neilson/Nelson) in Swedesboro.[22] It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as is Trinity Episcopal "Old Swedes" Church, which was established as a Swedish Lutheran Church in 1703; the present building dates to 1784.[23]

Trinity Church Cemetery is the burial place of Governor of New Jersey Charles C. Stratton and Congressman Benjamin Franklin Howey, among other notable interees.[24]

Through the late 1800s, Raccoon Creek was a water route that was naturally deep enough to transport wood and farming projects to Philadelphia by the Delaware River.

Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden, visited the borough as part of a 1976 tour of the United States.[21]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Swedesboro borough had a total area of 0.758 square miles (1.964 km2), including 0.724 square miles (1.876 km2) of land and 0.034 square miles (0.088 km2) of water (4.49%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Ivyside.[25]

Swedesboro is an independent municipality surrounded on all sides by Woolwich Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 1,477
1920 1,838 24.4%
1930 2,123 15.5%
1940 2,268 6.8%
1950 2,459 8.4%
1960 2,449 −0.4%
1970 2,287 −6.6%
1980 2,031 −11.2%
1990 2,024 −0.3%
2000 2,055 1.5%
2010 2,584 25.7%
Est. 2014 2,623 [10][26] 1.5%
Population sources: 1910-2000[27]
1910-1920[28] 1910[29]
1910-1930[30] 1930-1990[31]
2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,584 people, 938 households, and 645.3 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,568.4 per square mile (1,377.8/km2). There were 1,004 housing units at an average density of 1,386.5 per square mile (535.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 69.81% (1,804) White, 15.02% (388) Black or African American, 0.58% (15) Native American, 1.35% (35) Asian, 0.08% (2) Pacific Islander, 9.48% (245) from other races, and 3.68% (95) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 17.07% (441) of the population.[7]

There were 938 households, of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 17.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.27.[7]

In the borough, 27.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 32.5% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.7 years. For every 100 females there were 98.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,085 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,111) and the median family income was $70,050 (+/- $7,451). Males had a median income of $47,974 (+/- $4,268) versus $43,721 (+/- $3,157) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,623 (+/- $2,395). About 9.1% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.5% of those under age 18 and 18.8% of those age 65 or over.[34]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 2,055 people, 771 households, and 528 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,830.8 people per square mile (1,086.9/km2). There were 860 housing units at an average density of 1,184.7 per square mile (454.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.93% White, 16.50% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.34% Asian, 3.36% from other races, and 2.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.52% of the population.[32][33]

There were 771 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.22.[32][33]

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 32.0% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the borough was $49,286, and the median income for a family was $58,721. Males had a median income of $41,346 versus $33,125 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,857. About 7.8% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.4% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Swedesboro is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Swedesboro, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[35][36]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Swedesboro is Democrat Thomas W. Fromm, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. The Swedesboro Council consists of Council President George J. Weeks (D, 2016), Salvatore "Sam" Casella (R, 2015), David Flaherty (D, 2017), Joanna Gahrs (R, 2017), Diane Hale (D, 2016) and Patrick Wilbraham (D, 2015).[37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Swedesboro is located in the 2nd Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[8][41][42]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[44] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[45][46]

For the 2014–2015 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2014, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends December 31, 2015),[50] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[51] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[52] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2016),[53] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2016),[54] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014)[55] and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014).[56][57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[60] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[61] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[62][63][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,535 registered voters in Swedesboro, of which 471 (30.7%) were registered as Democrats, 311 (20.3%) were registered as Republicans and 751 (48.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 59.5% of the vote (632 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 39.3% (417 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (13 votes), among the 1,076 ballots cast by the borough's 1,618 registered voters (14 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 66.5%.[65][66] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 59.3% of the vote (625 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 38.1% (402 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (14 votes), among the 1,054 ballots cast by the borough's 1,492 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.6%.[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 49.7% of the vote (448 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 49.4% (445 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (5 votes), among the 901 ballots cast by the borough's 1,301 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 69.3.[68]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.0% of the vote (372 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 33.4% (191 votes), and other candidates with 1.6% (9 votes), among the 581 ballots cast by the borough's 1,597 registered voters (9 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.4%.[69][70] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 46.1% of the vote (316 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 41.5% (284 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 9.5% (65 votes) and other candidates with 0.1% (1 votes), among the 685 ballots cast by the borough's 1,507 registered voters, yielding a 45.5% turnout.[71]

Education[edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through sixth grade attend the Swedesboro-Woolwich School District, a consolidated school district that serves students from both Swedesboro and Woolwich Township. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's four schools had an enrollment of 1,716 students and 128.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.39:1.[72] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[73]) are Margaret C. Clifford School[74] (Kindergarten; 265 students), Charles C. Stratton School[75] (Grades 1-2; 496 students), Charles G. Harker School[76] (grades 3-5; 720 students) and Walter Hill School[77] (grade 6; 235 students).[78]

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades are educated by the Kingsway Regional School District, which also serves students from East Greenwich Township, South Harrison Township and Woolwich Township, with the addition of students from Logan Township who attend as part of a sending/receiving relationship in which tuition is paid on a per-pupil basis by the Logan Township School District.[79][80] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 2,060 students and 154.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.38:1.[81] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[82]) are Kingsway Regional Middle School[83] with 871 students in grades 7-8 and Kingsway Regional High School[84] with 1,189 students in grades 9-12.[85] Under a 2011 proposal, Kingsway would merge with its constituent member's K-6 districts to become a full K-12 district, with various options for including Logan Township as part of the consolidated district.[86]

Transportation[edit]

The Swede's Inn

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 10.94 miles (17.61 km) of roadways, of which 7.29 miles (11.73 km) were maintained by the municipality and 3.65 miles (5.87 km) by Gloucester County.[87]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between Salem and Philadelphia on the 401 route.[88][89]

The Salem Branch, a freight rail line, changes ownership at Swedesboro. The southern portion to the Port of Salem is owned by Salem County and operated by the Southern Railroad of New Jersey and interchanges with Conrail's South Jersey/Philadelphia Shared Assets Area operations which travels north to Pavonia Yard at Camden.[citation needed]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Swedesboro include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 12, 2015.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk's Office, Borough of Swedesboro. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 19.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Swedesboro, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Swedesboro borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Swedesboro borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 26, 2012.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Swedesboro, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Swedesboro, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 31, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  20. ^ 2010 Tree Cities USA Communities in New Jersey, National Arbor Day Foundation. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Burns, John F. "Town Prepares For a Royal Visit; Swedesboro Is Preparing For a Royal Visit on April 8", The New York Times, February 29, 1976. Accessed July 29, 2013. "Communications enthusiasts that they are, the young Landwehrs are evidently not tuned in to the talk of Swedesboro, which is alive these days with discussion of the forthcoming visit of Carl XVI Gustaf, the 29-year-old bachelor who is King of Sweden.... Known to its founders as Raccoon, Swedesboro had its beginnings in a cluster of log cabins that the first Swedish settlers in America built only 20 years after the first Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock."
  22. ^ Staff. "Log cabin in Greenwich may be oldest in country", Courier-Post, February 23, 2000. Accessed January 26, 2012. "The Nothnagle log cabin in Greenwich, Gloucester County, is believed to be the oldest log cabin in the United States."
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  79. ^ Kingsway Regional School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed March 10, 2015. "Kingsway is situated in a predominately rural/suburban area, with more than 20,000 people residing within its 52 square mile border. The District includes the Borough of Swedesboro and the Townships of South Harrison, East Greenwich, and Woolwich. Though not part of the District, students from Logan Township attend Kingsway High School through a send/receive relationship as paid tuition students. "
  80. ^ School Profile, Kingsway Regional School District. Accessed December 9, 2014. "The District includes Swedesboro and the Townships of South Harrison, East Greenwich and Woolwich. Though not part of the District, students from Logan Township attend Kingsway High School through a send/receive relationship as paid tuition students."
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  93. ^ Marino, Suzanne. "MRHS students dig the mighty tale of Dreadnoughtus discovery by alum", The Current, February 24, 2015. Accessed June 10, 2015. "Lacovara, who now lives in Swedesboro, has helped create a public fossil dig day in nearby Mantua Township, in Gloucester County, held in the fall for the past three years."
  94. ^ R.J. Page, CSTV. Accessed March 8, 2011.
  95. ^ Stratton House, Swedesboro, Stockton University Art & Architecture of New Jersey. Accessed August 25, 2013. "Located in Swedesboro, New Jersey, Stratton House (also known as Stratton Hall) was built in 1794 by its original owner Dr. James Stratton, M.D.... Charles C. Stratton, a graduate of Rutgers College, a member of the State General Assembly, a Congressman from 1837-1839 and 1841-1843, and New Jersey Governor from 1845-1848, called Stratton Hall home until his death on March 30, 1859."

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