Swedish Rhapsody No. 1

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Swedish Rhapsody No. 1 (Swedish: Svensk rapsodi) is the subtitle of Midsommarvaka (Swedish for Midsummer Vigil),[1] a symphonic rhapsody by the Swedish composer Hugo Alfvén (1872 – 1960). Although it is only the first of three similarly named works, it is often simply called the "Swedish Rhapsody".

The Rhapsody was written in 1903. It is the best-known piece by Alfvén, and also one of the best-known pieces of music in Sweden. The score, published around 1906, describes it as:[1]

[A] fantasy on popular Swedish folk melodies depicting the moods evoked by an old-time Swedish Midsummer wake; the dancing and games around the May-pole through the magic night of Midsummer Eve. [One theme] is the composer's own invention, while other themes are borrowed from the folk-music of Sweden and elaborated by the composer.

The Rhapsody was adapted as a ballet, La Nuit de St Jean, choreographed by Jean Börlin. It was first performed by Ballets Suedois in Paris in October 1920.

In popular culture[edit]

The main theme of "Swedish Rhapsody No. 1" has been used several times in pop culture:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Full score. Wilhelm Hansen. ca.1906.
  2. ^ "Swedish Rhapsody vs Luxembourg Polka". Hfunderground.com. Retrieved 2015-12-24. 
  3. ^ "G02". Priyom.org. Retrieved 2015-12-24. 
  4. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 348. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  5. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 352. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 

External links[edit]