Swedish general election, 1948

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Swedish general election, 1948
Sweden
← 1944 19 September 1948 1952 →

All 230 seats to the second chamber of the Riksdag
116 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Tage Erlander 1952.jpg Bertil Ohlin.jpg Axel Pehrsson-Bramstorp.jpg
Leader Tage Erlander Bertil Ohlin Axel Pehrsson-Bramstorp
Party Social Democratic People's Farmers' League
Last election 115 26 35
Seats won 112 57 30
Seat change Decrease3 Increase31 Decrease5
Popular vote 1,789,459 882,437 480,421
Percentage 46.1% 22.7% 12.4%

  Fourth party Fifth party
  Fritiof Domö 1959.JPG Sven Linderot.jpg
Leader Fritiof Domö Sven Linderot
Party Right Communist
Last election 39 15
Seats won 23 8
Seat change Decrease16 Decrease7
Popular vote 478,786 244,826
Percentage 12.3% 6.3%

PM before election

Tage Erlander
Social Democratic

Elected PM

Tage Erlander
Social Democratic

General elections were held in Sweden on 19 September 1948.[1] Despite a campaign by a large part of the Swedish press against socializing insurances, controlled foreign trade and rationing regulations still in use since the war, freshman Prime Minister and Social Democratic leader Tage Erlander managed to defeat the People's Party-led opposition under Bertil Ohlin by a higher election turnout. He maintained his government with only minor losses and the Swedish Social Democratic Party remained the largest party, winning 112 of the 230 seats in the Second Chamber of the Riksdag. Erlander was later to stay on as Prime Minister until 1969, in 1951-1957 his government included the party Farmers' League.[2]

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Swedish Social Democratic Party 1,789,459 46.1 112 –3
People's Party 882,437 22.7 57 +31
Farmers' League 480,421 12.4 30 –5
National Organisation of the Right 478,786 12.3 23 –16
Communist Party of Sweden 244,826 6.3 8 –7
Other parties 3,062 0.1 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 16,170
Total 3,895,161 100 230 0
Registered voters/turnout 4,707,783 82.7
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1858 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1872