Sweet Sixteen (KHSAA State Basketball Championship)

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The Kentucky High School Athletic Association boys' and girls' state basketball championships are single elimination tournaments held each March featuring 16 high schools. Colloquially known as the Sweet Sixteen (the KHSAA holds a trademark on the phrase), the tournament takes place over four days at Lexington's Rupp Arena for the boys and Highland Heights' BB&T Arena on the campus of Northern Kentucky University for the girls.

History of the Sweet Sixteen[edit]

The Kentucky High School Boys' Basketball State Tournament began in 1918. For fourteen years there were 18 regions that encompassed the tournament. Since 1932 there have only been 16 regions thus the term "Sweet Sixteen" was coined. Kentucky is one of only three states (Delaware and Hawaii) that still play a state tournament without a class system that divides large and small schools into separate tournaments.[1]

The first six tournaments were held at the UK Gymnasium in Lexington. After 1923 the tournament continued in Lexington but moved to Alumni Gymnasium on the University of Kentucky's campus where it stayed from 1924 until 1944. In 1945 the tournament moved to the Louisville Gardens until 1950 when it moved back to Lexington. For five years the tournament was held at Memorial Coliseum on Kentucky's campus. In 1957 the tournament was held at the newly built Freedom Hall in Louisville. From 1957 until 1964 the tournament alternated each year between Freedom Hall and Memorial Coliseum.

In 1965 Freedom Hall agreed to host the tournament for fourteen consecutive years until 1978. In 1979 the opening of Rupp Arena led to the tournament's return to Lexington. Since the move to Rupp Arena in 1979 the tournament has traditionally been played in the world famous arena. However, Freedom Hall has hosted the tournament six times since then with the last being in 1994. Since 1995 Rupp Arena has hosted the tournament each year.

Notable athletes who have competed in the Sweet Sixteen[edit]

Boys' (high school team/college team(s))[edit]

The following is a list of Notable players that have competed in the Sweet 16:

Player Years School College Notes
Butch Beard 1964-65 Breckinridge County Louisville Atlanta
Ralph Beard 1944-45 Louisville Male Kentucky Indianapolis
Brian Brohm 2004 Trinity Louisville (football) Green Bay (football)
Greg Buckner 1992, 1994 University Heights Clemson Dallas
J.R. Vanhoose 1995-98 Paintsville Marshall
Michael Bush 2001 Louisville Male Louisville (football) Chicago (football)
Mike Casey 1965-66 Shelby County Kentucky
Rex Chapman 1985 Apollo Kentucky Charlotte
Tim Couch 1990 Leslie County Kentucky (football) Cleveland (football)
Dave Cowens 1966 Newport Central Catholic Florida State Boston
Johnny Cox 1953, 1955 Hazard Kentucky Chicago
Richie Farmer 1986-88 Clay County Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner of Kentucky
Travis Ford Madisonville Kentucky Head Coach Oklahoma State
Jack Givens Lexington Bryan Station Kentucky Atlanta
Darrell Griffith Louisville Male Louisville Utah
Cliff Hagan Owensboro Kentucky St. Louis
Clem Haskins Taylor County Western Kentucky Chicago/Phoenix
Allan Houston Louisville Ballard Tennessee New York
Wallace "Wah Wah" Jones Harlan [2] Kentucky Indianapolis
Roy Kidd Corbin Eastern Kentucky Hall of Fame Football Coach
Jeff Lamp Ballard Virginia 1981 Consensus All-American
15th pick 1981 NBA Draft
Dan Langhi 1995 Marshall County Vanderbilt 2000 SEC Player of the Year
Chris Lofton Mason County Tennessee 2007 and 2008 Consensus All-American
2007 SEC Player of the Year
O.J. Mayo 2002 Rose Hill Christian USC 3rd pick 2008 NBA Draft
Darius Miller 2008 Mason County Kentucky
Dirk Minniefield Lexington Lafayette Kentucky Cleveland
Jim McDaniels Allen County,[3] Western Kentucky Seattle
Frank Selvy Corbin Furman Minneapolis/Los Angeles
Mike Silliman Louisville St. Xavier Army Buffalo
Greg Smith Princeton-Dotson Western Kentucky Milwaukee
Wes Unseld 1963, 1964 Louisville Seneca Louisville Washington
Bill Walker Rose Hill Christian Kansas State New York

2016 Whitaker Bank KHSAA Boys' Sweet Sixteen[edit]

March 16-20, 2016 Lexington, Kentucky; Rupp Arena
First round
March 16-17
Quarterfinals
March 18
State Semifinals
March 19
State Championship
March 20
                       
14 Buckhorn 35
1 Murray 62
Murray 54
Newport Central Catholic 75
7 Trinity 33
9 Newport Central Catholic 48
Newport Central Catholic 47
Paul Laurence Dunbar 55
11 Paul Laurence Dunbar 58
12 Mercer County 55
Paul Laurence Dunbar 57
Bowling Green 51
4 Bowling Green 75
16 Elliott County 59
Paul Laurence Dunbar 61
Doss 52
15 Lawrence County 57
6 Doss 66
Doss 69
Taylor County 58
10 Mason County 65
5 Taylor County 94
Doss 70
South Laurel 63
13 South Laurel 53
2 Christian County 50
South Laurel 71
South Oldham 42
8 South Oldham 58
3 Owensboro Catholic 34

[4]

KHSAA Boys' Sweet Sixteen State Champions[edit]

Year Champion Score Runner-Up Venue Most Valuable Player
1917 Owensboro 12-9 Somerset Centre College, Danville
1918 Lexington[5] 16-15 Somerset Centre College, Danville
1919 Lexington 21-17 Somerset UK Gymnasium, Lexington
1920 Lexington 56-13 Ashland[6] UK Gymnasium, Lexington
1921 DuPont Manual 32-17 Union Academy[7] UK Gymnasium, Lexington
1922 Lexington[5] 52-27 Frankfort UK Gymnasium, Lexington
1923 DuPont Manual 41-17 Clark County[8] UK Gymnasium, Lexington
1924 Lexington[5] 15-10 Fort Thomas[9] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1925 DuPont Manual 40-11 Winchester[10] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1926 St. Xavier 26-13 Danville Alumni Gym, Lexington
1927 Millersburg[11] 34-25 London[12] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1928 Ashland[6] 13-11 (4OT) Carr Creek[13] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1929 Heath[14] 21-16 Corinth[15] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1930 Corinth[15] 22-20 Kavanaugh[16] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1931 DuPont Manual 34-23 Tolu[17] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1932 Hazard 15-13 Male Alumni Gym, Lexington
1933 Ashland[6] 33-25 Horse Cave[18] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1934 Ashland[6] 26-13 Danville Alumni Gym, Lexington
1935 St. Xavier 32-18 Newport Alumni Gym, Lexington
1936 Corbin 24-18 Nebo[19] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1937 Midway[20] 30-22 Inez[21] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1938 Sharpe[22] 36-27 Maysville[23] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1939 Brooksville[24] 42-39 Hindman[25] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1940 Hazel Green[26] 35-29 Ashland[6] Alumni Gym, Lexington
1941 Inez[21] 35-27 St. Xavier Alumni Gym, Lexington
1942 Lafayette 44-32 Harlan[2] Armory, Louisville
1943 Hindman[25] 29-26 St. Xavier Alumni Gym, Lexington
1944 Harlan[2] 40-28 Dayton Alumni Gym, Lexington
1945 Male 54-42 Central City[27] Armory, Louisville
1946 Breckenridge Training[28] 68-36 Dawson Springs Armory, Louisville
1947 Maysville[23] 54-50 Brewers[29] Armory, Louisville
1948 Brewers[29] 65-48 Maysville[23] Armory, Louisville
1949 Owensboro 65-47 Lafayette Armory, Louisville
1950 Lafayette 55-51 Clark County[8] Armory, Louisville
1951 Clark County[8] 69-44 Cuba[30] Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1952 Cuba[30] 58-52 DuPont Manual Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1953 Lafayette 84-53 Paducah Tilghman[31] Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1954 Inez[21] 63-55 Newport Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1955 Hazard 74-66 Adair County Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1956 Carr Creek[13] 72-68 Henderson[32] Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1957 Lafayette 55-52 Eastern Freedom Hall, Louisville
1958 St. Xavier 60-49 Daviess County Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1959 North Marshall[33] 64-63 DuPont Manual Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1960 Flaget[34] 65-56 Monticello Freedom Hall, Louisville
1961 Ashland[6] 69-50 Lexington Dunbar[35] Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1962 St. Xavier 62-58 Ashland[6] Freedom Hall, Louisville
1963 Seneca 72-66 Lexington Dunbar[35] Freedom Hall, Louisville
1964 Seneca 66-56 Breckinridge County Memorial Coliseum, Lexington
1965 Breckinridge County 95-73 Covington Holy Cross Freedom Hall, Louisville
1966 Shelby County[36] 62-57 Male Freedom Hall, Louisville
1967 Earlington[37] 54-53 Covington Catholic Freedom Hall, Louisville
1968 Glasgow 77-68 Seneca Freedom Hall, Louisville
1969 Central 101-72 Ohio County Freedom Hall, Louisville
1970 Male 74-59 Richmond Madison[38] Freedom Hall, Louisville
1971 Male 83-66 Anderson County Freedom Hall, Louisville
1972 Owensboro 71-63 Elizabethtown Freedom Hall, Louisville
1973 Shawnee 81-68 Male Freedom Hall, Louisville
1974 Central 59-54 Male Freedom Hall, Louisville
1975 Male 74-59 Henry Clay Freedom Hall, Louisville
1976 Edmonson County 74-52 Christian County Freedom Hall, Louisville
1977 Ballard 68-59 Valley Freedom Hall, Louisville
1978 Shelby County 68-66 (OT) Covington Holmes Freedom Hall, Louisville
1979 Lafayette 62-52 Christian County Rupp Arena, Lexington
1980 Owensboro 57-56 Doss Freedom Hall, Louisville
1981 Simon Kenton 70-63 Mason County Rupp Arena, Lexington Troy McKinley (Simon Kenton)
1982 Laurel County[39] 53-51 North Hardin Rupp Arena, Lexington Todd May (Virgie)[40]
1983 Henry Clay 35-33 (3OT) Carlisle County Rupp Arena, Lexington Steve Miller (Henry Clay)
1984 Logan County 83-70 Bourbon County Rupp Arena, Lexington Fred Tisdale (Logan County)
1985 Hopkinsville 65-64 Clay County Rupp Arena, Lexington Wendall Quarles (Hopkinsville)
1986 Pulaski County[41] 47-45 Pleasure Ridge Park Rupp Arena, Lexington Reggie Hanson (Pulaski County)
1987 Clay County 76-73 (OT) Ballard Rupp Arena, Lexington Richie Farmer (Clay County)
1988 Ballard 88-79 Clay County Freedom Hall, Louisville Richie Farmer (Clay County)
1989 Pleasure Ridge Park 75-73 Wayne County Freedom Hall, Louisville Andy Penick (Pleasure Ridge Park)
1990 Fairdale 77-73 Covington Holmes Freedom Hall, Louisville Jermaine Brown (Fairdale)
1991 Fairdale 67-63 Tates Creek Rupp Arena, Lexington Jermaine Brown (Fairdale)
1992 University Heights 59-57 Lexington Catholic Freedom Hall, Louisville Darren Allaway (University Heights)
1993 Marion County 85-77 Paul Laurence Dunbar Rupp Arena, Lexington Anthony Epps (Marion County)
1994 Fairdale 59-56 Paul Laurence Dunbar Freedom Hall, Louisville Rashawn Morris (Fairdale)
1995 Breckinridge County 70-63 Pleasure Ridge Park Rupp Arena, Lexington Patrick Critchelow (Breckinridge County)
1996 Paintsville 71-53 Ashland Blazer Rupp Arena, Lexington J.R. VanHoose (Paintsville)
1997 Eastern 71-59 Fort Thomas Highlands Rupp Arena, Lexington Trent Coward (Eastern)
1998 Scott County 89-78 Paintsville Rupp Arena, Lexington Rick Jones (Scott County)
1999 Ballard 71-47 Scott County Rupp Arena, Lexington Will Partin (Ballard)
2000 Elizabethtown 79-69 Lexington Catholic Rupp Arena, Lexington Antwain Barbour (Elizabethtown)
2001 Lafayette 54-49 Male Rupp Arena, Lexington Robert A Madison (Lafayette)
2002 Lexington Catholic 83-53 Paducah Tilghman[31] Rupp Arena, Lexington DeMetrius Green (Lexington Catholic)
2003 Mason County 86-65 Ballard Rupp Arena, Lexington Chris Lofton (Mason County)
2004 Warren Central 66-56 Mason County Rupp Arena, Lexington Brock Whitney (Warren Central)
2005 South Laurel 70-59 Warren Central Rupp Arena, Lexington Walt Allen (South Laurel)
2006 Jeffersontown 61-48 Apollo Rupp Arena, Lexington Ceedrick Ware (Jeffersontown)
2007 Scott County 56-50 Ballard Rupp Arena, Lexington Bud Mackey (Scott County)
2008 Mason County 57-48 Covington Holmes Rupp Arena, Lexington Darius Miller (Mason County)
2009 Covington Holmes 67-63 (2OT) Louisville Central Rupp Arena, Lexington Ricardo Johnson (Holmes)
2010 Shelby Valley 73-61 Ballard Rupp Arena, Lexington Elisha Justice (Shelby Valley)
2011 Christian County 65-63 (2OT) Rowan County Rupp Arena, Lexington Anthony Hickey (Christian County)
2012 Trinity 71-53 Scott County Rupp Arena, Lexington Nathan Dieudonne (Trinity)
2013 Madison Central 65-64 Ballard Rupp Arena, Lexington Dominique Hawkins (Madison Central)
2014 Covington Catholic 59-51 (OT) Scott County Rupp Arena, Lexington Nick Ruthsatz (Covington Catholic)
2015 Owensboro 74-58 Bowling Green Rupp Arena, Lexington Justin Miller (Owensboro)
2016 Paul Laurence Dunbar 61-52 Doss Rupp Arena, Lexington Tavieon Hollingsworth (PLD)

Championships, by schools[edit]

The following is a list of all schools that have won at least one KHSAA Sweet Sixteen Championship, along with what years they have won their championship(s).
School Titles Years
Ashland 4 1928, 1933, 1934, 1961
Ballard 3 1977, 1988, 1999
Breckinridge County 2 1965, 1995
Breckinridge Training 1 1946
Brewers 1 1948
Brooksville 1 1939
Carr Creek 1 1956
Central 2 1969, 1974
Christian County 1 2011
Clark County 1 1951
Clay County 1 1987
Corbin 1 1936
Corinth 1 1930
Covington Catholic 1 2014
Cuba 1 1952
DuPont Manual 4 1921, 1923, 1925, 1931
Earlington 1 1967
Eastern 1 1997
Edmonson County 1 1976
Elizabethtown 1 2000
Fairdale 3 1990, 1991, 1994
Flaget 1 1960
Glasgow 1 1968
Harlan 1 1944
Hazard 2 1932, 1955
Hazel Green 1 1940
Heath 1 1929
Henry Clay 6 1918, 1919, 1920, 1922, 1924, 1983
Hindman High School 1 1943
Holmes 1 2009
Hopkinsville 1 1985
Inez 2 1941, 1954
Jeffersontown 1 2006
Lafayette 6 1942, 1950, 1953, 1957, 1979, 2001
Laurel County 1 1982
Lexington Catholic 1 2002
Logan County 1 1984
Madison Central 1 2013
Male 4 1945, 1970, 1971, 1975
Marion County 1 1993
Mason County 2 2003, 2008
Maysville 1 1947
Midway 1 1937
Millersburg Military Institute 1 1927
North Marshall 1 1959
Owensboro 5 1917, 1949, 1972, 1980, 2015
Paintsville 1 1996
Paul Laurence Dunbar 1 2016
Pleasure Ridge Park 1 1989
Pulaski County 1 1986
Scott County 2 1998, 2007
Seneca 2 1963, 1964
Sharpe 1 1938
Shawnee 1 1973
Simon Kenton 1 1981
Shelby County 2 1966, 1978
Shelby Valley 1 2010
St. Xavier 4 1926, 1935, 1958, 1962
South Laurel 1 2005
Trinity 1 2012
University Heights 1 1992
Warren Central 1 2004

KHSAA Girls' Sweet Sixteen State Champions[edit]

Year Champion Score Runner-Up Venue
1975 Louisville Butler 60-43 Barren County McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1976 Louisville Sacred Heart 68-55 Louisville Butler McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1977 Laurel County[39] 48-46 Paris McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1978 Laurel County[39] 63-48 Breathitt County McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1979 Laurel County[39] 43-36 Lexington Lafayette McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1980 Louisville Butler 65-49 Franklin County[42] McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1981 Pulaski County[41] 50-42 Marshall County McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1982 Marshall County 48-44 Louisville Mercy McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1983 Warren Central 57-49 Whitesburg [43] McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1984 Marshall County 55-53 Belfry McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1985 Whitley County 38-37 Louisville Atherton Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1986 Oldham County[44] 49-48 Franklin-Simpson Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1987 Laurel County[39] 50-48 Louisville Doss Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1988 Louisville Southern 57-34 Oldham County[44] Civic Center, Frankfort
1989 Clay County 48-44 George Rogers Clark Civic Center, Frankfort
1990 Lexington Henry Clay 62-50 Louisville Southern Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1991 Laurel County[39] 33-31 George Rogers Clark Civic Center, Frankfort
1992 Louisville Mercy 44-38 Clay County McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1993 Nicholas County 48-46 Warren East Civic Center, Frankfort
1994 M.C. Napier[45] 88-56 Fort Thomas Highlands Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1995 Scott County 68-45 Pulaski County[46] Civic Center, Frankfort
1996 Union County 44-37 Central Hardin Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
1997 Hazard 54-38 Elizabethtown Civic Center, Frankfort
1998 Elizabethtown 45-37 Montgomery County McBrayer Arena, Richmond
1999 Lexington Catholic 57-42 Louisville Assumption Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2000 West Carter 58-50 Shelby County[36] McBrayer Arena, Richmond
2001 Lexington Catholic 36-34 Louisville Manual Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2002 Louisville Sacred Heart 57-46 Jackson County Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2003 Louisville Sacred Heart 42-40 Lexington Catholic Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2004 Louisville Sacred Heart 43-34 Lexington Catholic Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2005 Lexington Catholic 59-54 Clinton County Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2006 Lexington Catholic 69-52 Rose Hill Christian Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2007 Lexington Christian 71-62 Louisville Iroquois Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2008 Louisville Butler 58-57 Franklin-Simpson Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2009 Louisville Iroquois 55-47 Elizabethtown Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2010 Louisville Mercy 71-61 Scott County Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2011 Rockcastle County 62-60 Louisville Manual Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2012 Louisville Manual 58-54 Marion County Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2013 Marion County 52-36 Notre Dame Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2014 Louisville Butler 49-38 Elizabethtown Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2015 Covington Holy Cross 35-32 Allen County-Scottsville Diddle Arena, Bowling Green
2016 Louisville Butler 62-36 Franklin County BB&T Arena, Highland Heights
2017 BB&T Arena, Highland Heights

Schools with at least three boys' state championships[edit]

Rank School Titles Years Won
1 Lexington Lafayette 6 1942, 1950, 1953, 1957, 1979, 2001
1 Lexington Henry Clay 6 1918, 1919, 1920, 1922, 1924, 1983
2 Owensboro 5 1917, 1949, 1972, 1980, 2015
3 Ashland 4 1928, 1933, 1934, 1961
3 Louisville Male 4 1945, 1970, 1971, 1975
3 Louisville Manual 3 1921, 1923, 1925, 1931
3 Louisville Saint Xavier 3 1926, 1935, 1958, 1962
4 Louisville Ballard 3 1977, 1988, 1999
4 Louisville Fairdale 3 1990, 1991, 1994

Schools with at least two girls' state championships[edit]

Rank School Titles Years Won
1 Laurel County 5 1977, 1978, 1979, 1987, 1991
1 Louisville Butler 5 1975, 1980, 2008, 2014, 2016
3 Lexington Catholic 4 1999, 2001, 2005, 2006
3 Louisville Sacred Heart 4 1976, 2002, 2003, 2004
5 Louisville Mercy 2 1992, 2010
5 Marshall County 2 1982, 1984

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "The tradition of Kentucky's Sweet Sixteen". The Ledger Independent. 2011-03-11. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  2. ^ a b c Unlike other schools in Harlan County, Harlan High did not participate in the 2008 consolidation that created Harlan. Harlan High is operated by the Harlan city school district, a separate district from that of the county.
  3. ^ This school was later consolidated with Scottsville High School to form today's Allen County-Scottsville High School.
  4. ^ 2015/16 Kentucky High School Boys Basketball Results
  5. ^ a b c Now Henry Clay High School.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g The predecessor to today's Paul G. Blazer High School.
  7. ^ Defunct.
  8. ^ a b c This is not the school that is today incorrectly referred to as "Clark County", properly known as George Rogers Clark High School. This was one of the two schools that merged to form "GRC".
  9. ^ The predecessor to today's Highlands High School, also in Fort Thomas.
  10. ^ This is the other school that merged to form today's George Rogers Clark High School.
  11. ^ Closed in 2003.
  12. ^ Later merged into Laurel County High School, which would win a boys' state title in 1982 and several girls' titles. Laurel County split in 1992 into today's North Laurel and South Laurel High Schools.
  13. ^ a b Consolidated into today's Knott County Central High School.
  14. ^ This is the "Heath" of the 1997 Heath High School shooting. The district that operates Heath, the McCracken County Public Schools, has received state approval for plans to consolidate its three current high schools into the new McCracken County High School, which it opened on August 9th 2013.
  15. ^ a b Consolidated into today's Grant County High School.
  16. ^ Consolidated into today's Anderson County High School.
  17. ^ Consolidated into today's Crittenden County High School.
  18. ^ Consolidated into today's Caverna High School.
  19. ^ Consolidated into West Hopkins High School, which was in turn consolidated into today's Hopkins County Central High School.
  20. ^ Consolidated into today's Woodford County High School.
  21. ^ a b c Consolidated into today's Sheldon Clark High School.
  22. ^ Consolidated into North Marshall High School, which would win a state title of its own in 1959. Still later, North Marshall was consolidated into today's Marshall County High School in 1974.
  23. ^ a b c Absorbed by Mason County High School.
  24. ^ Consolidated into today's Bracken County High School.
  25. ^ a b Consolidated into today's Knott County Central High School.
  26. ^ Consolidated into Laurel County High School along with London, Bush and Lily High Schools in 1971.
  27. ^ Consolidated into Muhlenberg North High School in 1990, which in turn consolidated with Muhlenberg South High School in 2009 to form today's Muhlenberg County High School.
  28. ^ Defunct.
  29. ^ a b Consolidated into South Marshall High School, which would itself consolidate in 1974 to form today's Marshall County High School.
  30. ^ a b Later absorbed by Sedalia High School, which would in turn be consolidated into today's Graves County High School.
  31. ^ a b Tilghman did not participate in the 2013 McCracken County consolidation, as it is operated by a separate school district.
  32. ^ Consolidated into today's Henderson County High School.
  33. ^ Consolidated into today's Marshall County High School in 1974.
  34. ^ Closed in 1974.
  35. ^ a b This is not the modern Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, but rather Lexington's former black high school, from which today's "PLD" indirectly took its name.
  36. ^ a b In August 2010, the Shelby County High attendance zone was cut roughly in half with the opening of the new Martha Layne Collins High School.
  37. ^ Consolidated into South Hopkins High School, another of the high schools which would eventually consolidate into today's Hopkins County Central.
  38. ^ Closed in 1989, with its attendance zone moved into that of Madison Central High School.
  39. ^ a b c d e f Split in 1992 into today's North Laurel and South Laurel High Schools. The old Laurel County High building houses South Laurel.
  40. ^ Consolidated into today's Shelby Valley High School.
  41. ^ a b This school still exists, but with a smaller attendance zone, as it spawned Southwestern High School in 1993.
  42. ^ This school still exists, but with a considerably smaller attendance zone, having spawned Western Hills High School in 1981.
  43. ^ Later consolidated into Letcher County Central High School.
  44. ^ a b This school still exists, but has a considerably smaller attendance zone, having spawned first South Oldham High School and later North Oldham High School.
  45. ^ As noted in the main text, this was Napier's last year of existence, as it would be consolidated into Perry County Central High School that fall (autumn).
  46. ^ This was after Pulaski County High had spawned Southwestern.