Swimming at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre backstroke

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Women's 200 metre backstroke
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
VenueOlympic Aquatics Stadium
Dates11 August 2016 (heats &
semifinals)
12 August 2016 (final)
Competitors28 from 20 nations
Winning time2:05.99
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Maya DiRado  United States
2nd, silver medalist(s) Katinka Hosszú  Hungary
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Hilary Caldwell  Canada
← 2012
2020 →

The women's 200 metre backstroke event at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place on 11–12 August at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium.[1]

U.S. swimmer Maya DiRado saved her best race for last before retiring from the sport, as she upset Hungary's Katinka Hosszú on the home stretch to claim the distance backstroke title. Coming from behind at the 150-metre turn, DiRado produced a late surge to touch out the Hungarian favorite by six hundredths of a second for the gold medal in 2:05.99.[2][3] Hosszú commanded a solid lead through the first half of the race, but she was unable to hold off DiRado about the midway of the final lap, leaving with a silver in 2:06.05.[4] Meanwhile, Canada's Hilary Caldwell swam her way into the bronze-medal position with a 2:07.54.[5][6]

Russia's Daria Ustinova, who was allowed to compete in Rio after successfully appealing from her doping ban, obtained the fourth spot in 2:07.89, edging out Australia's Belinda Hocking (2:08.02) to fifth by 0.13 of a second.[7] Zimbabwe's Kirsty Coventry, a five-time Olympian and double gold medalist in this event, capped off her illustrious Olympic career with a sixth-place finish in 2:08.80.[8] Chinese teenager Liu Yaxin (2:09.03) and Iceland's Eygló Ósk Gústafsdóttir (2:09.44) rounded out the top eight.[6]

World-record holder Missy Franklin missed the opportunity to defend her Olympic title in the final, after placing fourteenth in the semifinals (2:09.74).[9][10] Other notable swimmers failed to reach the top eight roster, including Hocking's teammate and reigning world champion Emily Seebohm, London 2012 silver medalist Anastasia Fesikova of Russia, and Ukraine's Daryna Zevina, runner-up at the European Championships two months earlier.[11]

Records[edit]

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Missy Franklin (USA) 2:04.06 London, United Kingdom 3 August 2012
Olympic record  Missy Franklin (USA) 2:04.06 London, United Kingdom 3 August 2012

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 3 4 Katinka Hosszú  Hungary 2:06.09 Q, NR
2 3 3 Hilary Caldwell  Canada 2:07.40 Q
3 3 5 Maya DiRado  United States 2:08.60 Q
4 2 6 Lisa Graf  Germany 2:08.67 Q
4 5 Belinda Hocking  Australia Q
6 3 7 Liu Yaxin  China 2:08.84 Q
7 2 3 Dominique Bouchard  Canada 2:08.87 Q
8 4 3 Daryna Zevina  Ukraine 2:08.88 Q
9 3 2 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.91 Q
10 4 4 Emily Seebohm  Australia 2:09.00 Q
11 2 4 Missy Franklin  United States 2:09.36 Q
12 4 2 Eygló Ósk Gústafsdóttir  Iceland 2:09.62 Q
13 2 5 Daria Ustinova  Russia 2:09.96 Q
14 3 6 Anastasia Fesikova  Russia 2:10.39 Q
15 2 2 Matea Samardžić  Croatia 2:10.51 Q
16 4 6 Jenny Mensing  Germany 2:10.68 Q
17 2 7 Margherita Panziera  Italy 2:10.92
18 4 7 Claudia Lau  Hong Kong 2:10.94
19 2 1 Duane da Rocha  Spain 2:11.17
20 2 8 Alicja Tchórz  Poland 2:11.40
21 1 5 Ekaterina Avramova  Turkey 2:12.98
22 3 1 Réka György  Hungary 2:12.99
23 1 4 Simona Baumrtova  Czech Republic 2:13.26
24 1 3 Martina van Berkel  Switzerland 2:13.46
25 4 8 África Zamorano  Spain 2:13.74
26 3 8 Natsumi Sakai  Japan 2:13.99
27 4 1 Chen Jie  China 2:14.18
28 1 6 Yessy Yosaputra  Indonesia 2:20.88

Semifinals[edit]

Semifinal 1[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Hilary Caldwell  Canada 2:07.17 Q
2 3 Liu Yaxin  China 2:07.56 Q
3 7 Eygló Ósk Gústafsdóttir  Iceland 2:08.84 Q, NR
4 6 Daryna Zevina  Ukraine 2:09.07
5 1 Anastasia Fesikova  Russia 2:09.12
6 2 Emily Seebohm  Australia 2:09.39
7 5 Lisa Graf  Germany 2:09.56
8 8 Jenny Mensing  Germany 2:10.15

Semifinal 2[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Katinka Hosszú  Hungary 2:06.03 Q, NR
2 5 Maya DiRado  United States 2:07.53 Q
3 3 Belinda Hocking  Australia 2:07.83 Q
4 2 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.83 Q
5 1 Daria Ustinova  Russia 2:08.84 Q
6 6 Dominique Bouchard  Canada 2:09.07
7 7 Missy Franklin  United States 2:09.74
8 8 Matea Samardžić  Croatia 2:09.83

Final[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) 3 Maya DiRado  United States 2:05.99
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Katinka Hosszú  Hungary 2:06.05
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Hilary Caldwell  Canada 2:07.54
4 8 Daria Ustinova  Russia 2:07.89
5 2 Belinda Hocking  Australia 2:08.02
6 7 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.80
7 6 Liu Yaxin  China 2:09.03
8 1 Eygló Ósk Gústafsdóttir  Iceland 2:09.44

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women's 200m Backstroke". Rio 2016. Archived from the original on 26 August 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  2. ^ Trevelyan, Mark (12 August 2016). "DiRado bows out with backstroke gold". Reuters. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  3. ^ Crouse, Karen (12 August 2016). "Maya DiRado, Exiting the Sport, Catches Katinka Hosszu and Grabs Gold". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Maya DiRado bests Hungary's 'Iron Lady' Katinka Hosszu by a fingernail in women's 200m backstroke final". Daily Mail. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  5. ^ Ng, Callum (12 August 2016). "Hilary Caldwell wins bronze, Canada's 6th swim medal". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Maya DiRado Upsets Katinka Hosszu For Victory In The 200 Back". Swimming World Magazine. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  7. ^ Colman, Mike (12 August 2016). "Ghost of the London Olympics still haunt Australian swim team, according to Belinda Hocking". The Courier-Mail. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  8. ^ "Coventry caps Olympic career with 6th-place finish". Zimbabwe: The Standard. 12 August 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  9. ^ "Katinka Hosszu Soars Ahead Of 200 Back Semi-Finals Field". Swimming World Magazine. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  10. ^ "Swimming: Rio turns into an Olympic-sized disappointment for Missy Franklin". Salt Lake Tribune. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  11. ^ Chammas, Michael (12 August 2016). "Mitch Larkin wins Rio Olympics silver as Emily Seebohm fails to qualify for final". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  12. ^ a b Auerbach, Nicole (4 August 2012). "USA's Missy Franklin wins another gold, sets world record". USA Today. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  13. ^ a b "US swimmer Missy Franklin sets world record, Phelps ends individual races with medal". Fox News. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 11 July 2013.