Sydney Secondary College Blackwattle Bay Campus

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Sydney Secondary College
Blackwattle Bay Campus
Sydney Secondary College.JPG
Location
Sydney, NSW
Australia
Coordinates 33°52′31″S 151°11′16″E / 33.87520°S 151.18783°E / -33.87520; 151.18783Coordinates: 33°52′31″S 151°11′16″E / 33.87520°S 151.18783°E / -33.87520; 151.18783
Information
Type Public
Motto Quality, Opportunity, Diversity
Established 1979
Principal Sharon Roberts
Enrolment 650
Campus Urban (Glebe)
Colour(s) Navy blue & white
Website

Blackwattle Bay Campus is a government high school in Glebe, New South Wales, Australia. It is the senior campus of Sydney Secondary College. The school was established in 1979 as Glebe High School, with 109 students and 17 staff members, all housed in demountable classrooms.[1] The school catered only for Year 7 in its first year. Permanent buildings were built in the early 1980s. In 2002, the school became part of Sydney Secondary College and was renamed Blackwattle Bay Campus.

Since 2005, it is exclusively a senior campus catering for Years 11 and 12. This enables the school to offer one of the largest range of Higher School Certificate courses in Sydney.[2] Unlike the junior campuses, Blackwattle Bay Campus does not have a selective stream and, upon graduating from the junior campuses, selective students are mixed with mainstream students in all classes.[3]

The campus has a sister-school relationship with Malibaca Yamato High School in East Timor,[4] and a volunteer project in community work.[5]

Achievements[edit]

In 2005, Fawad Qaiser became the first student to sit for a Higher School Certificate (HSC) examination using the Auslan sign language.[6] In 2011, Chinese language teacher, Chorng Leu, was awarded a Premier’s Teacher Scholarship to undertake an international study tour.[7]

First in Course[edit]

A number of Blackwattle Bay students have been awarded first place in the state in an HSC course:

Year Name Course Reference
2010 Damian Spinks Chinese Beginners [8]
2008 Shifra Waks Chinese Beginners
French Beginners
[9]
2006 Lily Ng Japanese Beginners [10]
2005 Yi Wen Zhang Chinese Background Speakers [11]
2004 Chrissie Lukas Chinese Beginners [12]
2002 Andrew Hammett Information Technology [13]
2001 Natalia Wiguno Chinese Beginners [14]

Sports[edit]

The school has sports that are compulsory for all year 11 students, including rowing which can be done in the morning or afternoon. Blackwattle Bay is on the waterfront, and accordingly offers both rowing and kayaking as sporting options, a unique feature of the sporting curriculum that sets it apart from other urban Sydney high schools. A wide range of sports are available at Blackwattle Bay Campus. A student has the choice to participate in badminton, soccer, basketball, netball, baseball, football, table tennis, fitness walking, tennis, rockclimbing, swimming or softball

Students with disabilities participate in an annual state athletics carnival that can lead to selection in the Australian team for the Paralympic Games.[15]

History[edit]

Prior to 2002, Blackwattle Bay Campus was known as Glebe High School and held classes for students from Year 7 through to Year 12. Student enrolments increased significantly when the school was transformed into a senior campus.[16]

In 2012, local resident Robert Brand, his son Jason Brand, together with students from Leichhardt Public School and the senior students at the Blackwattle Bay Campus, launched and tracked a balloon into near space as a science project.[17][18] The balloon reached approximately 25km before it burst.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laurence, Michael (18 November 1980). "Split over inner-city schools". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  2. ^ McDougall, Bruce (1 May 2007). "Birth boom boosts schools". dailytelegraph.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "Checking the male". smh.com.au. 23 June 2004. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  4. ^ Tetley, Alicia (1 September 2011). "SYD SECONDARY COLLEGE: Sister-plan trip to East timor". inner-west-courier.whereilive.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  5. ^ Alexander, Harriet (10 May 2008). "Students chosen on good works". smh.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  6. ^ Burke, Kelly (24 October 2005). "Student breaks exam's sound barrier with sign language". smh.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  7. ^ Herbertson, Lisa (19 September 2011). "Teacher wins scholarship & meets Barry O'Farrell". inner-west-courier.whereilive.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  8. ^ "2010 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  9. ^ "2008 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  10. ^ "2006 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  11. ^ "2005 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  12. ^ "2004 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  13. ^ "2002 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  14. ^ "2001 HSC First in Course". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  15. ^ Hamwi, Omar (10 August 2012). "Disabled athletes compete at Olympic Par". inner-west-courier.whereilive.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  16. ^ Patty, Anna (9 March 2007). "Enrolments rise in some public schools". smh.com.au. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  17. ^ Primrose Riordan (19 January 2012). "Students help launch balloon into space". Inner West Courier. Retrieved 5 December 2012. 
  18. ^ Danika Wilkinson (17 January 2012). "Sydney's Space Aces: Father-Son DIY Exploration". Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  19. ^ Ben Grubb (16 January 2012). "Sydneys very own Space Agency Brand and Son". Retrieved 5 December 2012.