Syed Saddiq

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Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman

سيد صديق بن سيد عبدالرحمن
Syed Saddiq at Open Forum ASEAN 4.0 for All.jpg
Minister of Youth and Sports
Assumed office
2 July 2018
MonarchMuhammad V
Prime MinisterMahathir Mohamad
DeputySteven Sim
Preceded byKhairy Jamaluddin
ConstituencyMuar
Member of the Malaysian Parliament
for Muar, Johor
Assumed office
9 May 2018
Prime MinisterMahathir Mohamad
Preceded byRazali Ibrahim (UMNO-BN)
Majority6,953 (2018)
ARMADA Youth Chief of the Malaysian United Indigenous Party
Assumed office
2016
PresidentMuhyiddin Yassin
Preceded byPosition Established
Personal details
Born
Syed Saddiq bin Syed Abdul Rahman

(1992-12-06) 6 December 1992 (age 26)
(26 years, 12 days)
Pulai, Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia
CitizenshipMalaysian
Political partyBERSATU (since 2016)
EducationRoyal Military College
Alma materInternational Islamic University Malaysia
OccupationPolitician
ProfessionActivist
WebsiteOfficial website

Syed Saddiq bin Syed Abdul Rahman (Jawi: سيد صديق بن سيد عبدالرحمن; born 6 December 1992) is a Malaysian politician and activist. He is the current Minister of Youth and Sports, the Member of Parliament of Muar and the Youth Chief of the Malaysian United Indigenous Party or Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia (BERSATU), a component of Pakatan Harapan (PH) coalition. He is also the youngest ever federal minister in 2018 since Malaysia's independence.[1]

Early life[edit]

Syed Saddiq was born on 6 December 1992 in Pulai, Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia.

Politics[edit]

Syed Saddiq is the leader of Armada; the youth wing of the BERSATU.[2] He has been a spokesperson for the party since its inception in 2016 and is considered one of the founding members and sits on the party council.[3][4]

Syed Saddiq made his debut contesting the 2018 general election for the Muar parliamentary seat and was elected to the Parliament.[5][6] He also currently is a Minister of Youth and Sport.[7]

As the Minister of Youth and Sports, Saddiq wants to push for a lower voting age, or eligibility to vote in Malaysia, from 21 to 18 years old. He wants it done ahead of the 15th General Election. However, he has agreed that first a political exposure programme for the young people of Malaysia needed.[8][9]

Election results[edit]

Parliament of Malaysia[10][11][12]
Year Constituency Government Votes Pct Opposition(s) Votes Pct Ballots cast Majority Turnout
2018 P146 Muar, Johor Syed Saddiq (PPBM) 22,341 53.09% Razali Ibrahim (UMNO) 15,388 36.57% 42,719 6,953 84.02%
Abdul Aziz Talib (PAS) 4,354 10.34%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "10 Things About Syed Saddiq Abedul Rahman, Asia's Top Debater". themalaymailonline.com. Retrieved 2017-09-03.
  2. ^ "Malaysia: Mahathir-led Group Files Paperwork for New Party". BenarNews. Retrieved 2017-09-03.
  3. ^ "Critics of Malaysian PM submit papers to register new political party". Channel NewsAsia. Retrieved 2017-09-03.
  4. ^ "Bersatu". pribumibersatu.org.my. Retrieved 2017-09-03.
  5. ^ "PH's Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman wins Muar". Free Malaysia Today. 10 May 2018. Retrieved 14 June 2018.
  6. ^ Amar Shah Mohsen and Haikal Jalil (10 May 2018). "Syed Saddiq: Thank you Muar, Malaysia". The Sun Daily. Retrieved 14 June 2018.
  7. ^ Syed Farradino Omar. "MALAYSIA BAHARU: Syed Saddiq: Muar Kitten Ready to Roar in Putrajaya". Awani Rreview. Astro Awani. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Voting age should be lowered to 18, says Syed Saddiq - Nation | The Star Online". www.thestar.com.my. Retrieved 2018-08-02.
  9. ^ "Gov't aims to lower voting age to empower youth: Syed Saddiq". New Straits Times. 23 July 2018. Retrieved 2 Aug 2018.
  10. ^ "Malaysia General Election". undiinfo Malaysian Election Data. Malaysiakini. Retrieved 4 February 2018. Results only available from the 2004 election.
  11. ^ "SEMAKAN KEPUTUSAN PILIHAN RAYA UMUM KE - 14" (in Malay). Election Commission of Malaysia. Retrieved 17 May 2018. Percentage figures based on total turnout.
  12. ^ "The Star Online GE14". The Star. Retrieved 24 May 2018. Percentage figures based on total turnout.