Symphony No. 2 (Bruckner)

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Symphony No. 2
by Anton Bruckner
Bruckner circa 1860.jpg
A portrait of Anton Bruckner, c. 1860
Key C minor
Catalogue WAB 102
Composed 1872
Published
Recorded 1953 (1953)
Movements 4
Premiere
Date 26 October 1873 (1873-10-26)
(1873 version)
Location Vienna
Conductor Bruckner
Performers Vienna Philharmonic

Anton Bruckner’s Symphony No. 2 in C minor, sometimes known as the “Symphony of Pauses,”[1] was completed in 1872. It was actually the fourth symphony composed by Bruckner, after the Study Symphony in F minor (1863), the Symphony No. 1 in C minor (1866), and the Symphony "No. 0" in D minor (1869).

History[edit]

In the fall of 1871, after having become established in Vienna, Anton Bruckner embarked on a new symphonic project, his fourth, which in less than a year would result in a completed and copied score of nearly 2000 bars.[2] The Symphony No. 2, the composition of which became mostly written in the summer of 1872, represents a breakthrough in Bruckner’s conception of the symphony. Although Bruckner had been composing sonata-form movements with three distinct themes since he began writing symphonies in 1862, in 1872 he greatly expanded the scope of their presentation and development, and established the framework, which he will use consistently in all of his subsequent symphonic work.[3] Moreover, the Adagio of this symphony is in ABA’B’A’’ lied form followed by a coda – the framework which Bruckner will use in his subsequent symphonic work, with exception of the Sixth.[4]

The Second Symphony is the only numbered Bruckner symphony without a dedication; Franz Liszt tacitly rejected the dedication, and Richard Wagner chose the Symphony No. 3 in D minor when offered both works. The symphony was planned to be performed in the same year by the Vienna Philharmonic under Otto Dessoff. However, the rehearsal did not lead to a performance, because Dessoff and a number of players considered it impossible to perform. Nevertheless, the symphony was premiered the following year, on 26 October 1873, by the Vienna Philharmonic with Bruckner himself on the podium.

Description[edit]

The score calls for a pair each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, and strings.

The symphony has four movements. In the First Version (1872) they are:

  • I. Allegro: Ziemlich schnell (C minor)
  • II. Scherzo (C minor) - Trio (C major)
  • III. Adagio (A flat major)
  • IV. Finale (C minor)

In the Second Version (1877) they are:

  • I. Moderato
  • II. Andante: Feierlich, etwas bewegt
  • III. Scherzo: Mäßig schnell - Trio: Gleiches tempo
  • IV. Finale: Mehr schnell

The description below will use the tempo markings of the final version.

First movement[edit]

The symphony opens with tremolo strings and the lyrical main theme emerges from under this:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative c'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo "Moderato" 2 = 60
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. \p ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  | % 2
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  | % 3
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  | % 4
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  | % 5
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  | % 6
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. ~ :8 ~ ~
  }
  \times 4/6  {
    <c es c'>2. :8
  }
  }
\new Staff \relative as' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2
  R1*2 | % 3
  as2. \mf \< ( g4 ) | % 4
  fis2 \! \> ( g4 ) r4 \! | % 5
  as2 \< ( ~ as8 g8 f8 es8 ) | % 6
  f4 \! \> ( fis4 g4 ) r4 \! }
>> }

Note that although there is tremolo, it is a somewhat slower tremolo than what Bruckner would employ in later symphonies. Shortly after this, an "enigmatic" trumpet call appears:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative c'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 2 = 60
  c4. c8 \times 2/3 {
    c4. c8 c4
  }
  | % 2
  c4. c8 \times 2/3 {
    c4. c8 c4
  }
  | % 3
  g4 r4 r2
  }
>> }

This rhythm is an important device and will recur throughout the movement.[5] The first theme group closes with one of the symphony's characteristic pauses and leads to the second theme group in E flat major:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 2 = 60 \relative g' {
  \clef "treble" \key es \major \stemUp \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \time 2/2 | % 1
  g4 \p ( bes,4 ) bes'4 ( bes,4 ) | % 2
  as'4 -! bes,4 ( d4 bes'4 ) | % 3
  g4 ( bes,4 ) bes'4 ( bes,4 ) | % 4
  as'4 -! bes,4 ^( d4 bes'4 ) | % 5
  g4 ^( bes,4 ) bes'4 ^( bes,4 ) | % 6
  as'4 -! bes,4 ^( d4 bes'4 ) | % 7
  bes4 r4 r2 }
  \relative bes {
  \clef "treble" \key es \major \stemDown \time 2/2 | % 1
  s1*3 | % 4
  r2 bes2 _~ | % 5
  bes2 bes2 _~ | % 6
  bes2 bes2 _~ | % 7
  bes4 s4 s2 } >>
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \relative es, {
  \clef "bass" \key es \major \stemDown \time 2/2 
  es4 r4 g4 r4 | % 2
  f4 r4 bes,4 r4 | % 3
  es4 r4 g4 \mf r4 | % 4
  f4 r4 bes,4 r4 | % 5
  es4 r4 g4 r4 | % 6
  f4 r4 bes,4 r4 | % 7
  es4 r4 r2 }
  \relative bes {
  \clef "bass" \key es \major \stemUp \time 2/2
  s2*4 | % 3
  r2 bes2 ~ | % 4
  bes2 c4 d4 | % 5
  es1 ~ | % 6
  es4 d4 c4 d4 | % 7
  es2 s4 s4 } >>
>> }

The third theme group is also in E flat major:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative bes' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 2 = 60
  R1*2\p | % 3
  r4 <bes bes'>2 <bes bes'>4 ~ ~ | % 4
  <bes bes'>4 <es es'>2 ( <d d'>4 ) | % 5
  <g, g'>4 <c c'>2 ( <bes bes'>4 ) ~ ~ | % 6
  <bes bes'>4 <es, es'>4 <bes' bes'>2
  }
\new Staff \relative es { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef bass \time 2/2
  <es es'>4 \p -! <bes bes'>8 ( <es
  es'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <f' f'>8 | % 2
  <g g'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <g' g'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <f'
  f'>8 | % 3
  <es es'>4 ) -! <bes bes'>8 ( <es es'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 (
  <f' f'>8 | % 4
  <g g'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <g' g'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <f'
  f'>8 | % 5
  <es es'>4 ) -! <bes bes'>8 ( <es es'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 (
  <f' f'>8 | % 6
  <g g'>4 ) -! <bes, bes'>8 ( <g' g'>8 <f f'>4 ) -! r4 \! }
>> }

The trumpet call from the first group recurs here. The movement heads into its development after a brief codetta. The recapitulation opens just as the exposition did; with tremolo strings giving way to the main theme and the reappearance of the trumpet call. At the end, there is a brief recollection of the main theme before a grand peroration closes the movement. The first part of the coda is cut in the second version.

Adagio/Andante (Second in 1877, Third in 1872)[edit]

This movement opens quietly with the strings:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo "Feierlich, etwas bewegt" 4 = 40 \relative es'' {
  \clef "treble" \key aes \major \stemUp \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \time 4/4 | % 1
  r2 \p es2 | % 2
  es,2 -> des8 _\markup{ \italic {cresc.} } f8 g8 as8 | % 3
  bes2 des4. ^( c8 ) | % 4
  c2 r2 }
\relative c'' {
  \clef "treble" \stemDown \key aes \major \time 4/4 | % 1
  c2 as2_~ | % 2
  as2 f2 | % 3
  es1 _~ | % 4
  es2 s2 } >>
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \relative es' {
  \clef "bass" \key aes \major \stemUp \time 4/4 
  es2 \p c2 | % 2
  as2 des2 ^~ | % 3
  des2 bes2 | % 4
  c2 r2 }
  \relative as {
  \clef "bass" \stemDown \key as \major \time 4/4 as2 es2 | % 2
  f1 | % 3
  g2 bes2 | % 4
  as2 s2 } >>
>> }

This movement is the first Bruckner slow movement in five-part ternary form and so this part will recur twice. The second part of the movement begins with pizzicato strings introducing a new theme on the horns:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative des' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key aes \major \clef bass \time 4/4 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 4 = 54
  R1 | % 2
  des2 \p ^\markup{ \italic {dolce} } ( as4. _\markup{
    \italic
    {cresc.}
  } bes8 | % 3
  c8 bes16 as16 ges2 _\markup{ \italic {dim.} } des8 es8 | % 4
  f4 ) r4 r2
  }
\new Staff \relative as' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key aes \major \clef treble \time 4/4
  <as c f>8 \pp ^"pizz." r8 r4 <g c es>8 \< r8 <as c f>8 <g c es>8 | % 2
  <bes des ges>8 r8 \! <as des f>8 r8 r4 <as c es>8 \> <f bes des>8 | % 3
  <f as c>8 r8 <des ges bes>8 r8 \! r4 <des f as>8 <bes es ges>8 | % 4
  <a c f>8 r8 r4 r2 }
>> }

The second part was cut roughly in half in the second version. The latter half contained a decorated restatement of the horn theme. However, the fourth part of the movement contains a similar (But not identical) passage in both versions. Near the end of the movement, Bruckner quotes from the Benedictus of his F minor Mass before the main theme begins the coda:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 4 = 40 \relative c' {
  \clef "treble" \key aes \major \stemUp \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \time 4/4 | % 1
  r2 \p r4 c4 | % 2
  g'4. ^( as8 ) as4 es4 _\markup{ \italic {cresc.} } | % 3
  bes'4. ^( c8 ) c4 es4 | % 4
  des4 c8 as8 f8 _\markup{ \italic {dim.} } g8 as8 bes8 | % 5
  bes2 \pp as2 ^~ | % 6
  as2 r2 }
\relative c' {
  \clef "treble" \stemDown \key as \major \time 4/4 | % 1
  s2 s4 c4 _~ | % 2
  c8 c8 _( des8 c8 des8 c8 ) es4 _~ | % 3
  es8 es8 _( fes8 es8 fes8 es8 ) ges4 | % 4
  f8 g8 as4 as,4 f'4 | % 5
  es1 _~ | % 6
  es1 } >>
  \new Staff <<
    \new Voice \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \relative c {
  \clef "bass" \key aes \major \stemDown \time 4/4 
  r2 \p r4 c4 _~ | % 2
  c8 c8 _( des8 c8 des8 c8 ) es4 _\markup{ \italic {cresc.} } _~ | % 3
  es8 es8 _( fes8 es8 fes8 es8 ) r4 | % 4
  r4 es'2 _\markup{ \italic {dim.} } des4 | % 5
  des2 \pp c2 _~ | % 6
  c2 r2 }
  \relative g {
  \clef "bass" \stemUp \key as \major \time 4/4 s2 s4 g4 | % 2
  g2 as4 bes4 | % 3
  bes2 c2 | % 4
  des4 es4 r2 | % 5
  es,1 } >>
>> }

Scherzo (Third in 1877, Second in 1872)[edit]

In the first version, both sections of the Scherzo and both sections of the Trio are repeated. These repeats were excised in the second version. The Scherzo is based on rhythmic theme heard at the outset:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative c'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 3/4 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo "Mäßig schnell" 4 = 245
  <c c'>8 \ff <b b'>8 <c c'>4 <g g'>4
  | % 2
  <f f'>4 <g g'>4 r4 | % 3
  <g g'>8 <fis fis'>8 <g g'>4 <d d'>4 | % 4
  <c c'>4 <es es'>4 r4
  }
\new Staff \relative c { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef bass \time 3/4
  <c c'>8 \ff <b b'>8 <c c'>4 <g
  g'>4 | % 2
  <f f'>4 <g g'>4 r4 | % 3
  <g g'>8 <fis fis'>8 <g g'>4 <d d'>4 | % 4
  <c c'>4 <es es'>4 r4 }
>> }

The Trio is based on a "tipsy" melody in the violas:[5]


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative c'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \major \clef treble \time 3/4 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo "Gleiches tempo" 4 = 190
  <c g' c g'>2. \p ~ :16 ~ ~ ~ | % 2
  <c g' c g'>2. ~ :16 ~ ~ ~ | % 3
  <c g' c g'>2. ~ :16 ~ ~ ~ | % 4
  <c g' c g'>2. ~ :16 ~ ~ ~ | % 5
  <c g' c g'>2. ~ :16 ~ ~ ~ | % 6
  <c g' c g'>2. :16
  }
\new Staff \relative e' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \major \clef treble \time 3/4
  R2.*2 | % 3
  e2 \mf ( f4 ) | % 4
  e2 ( d4 ) | % 5
  e4 \< ( g4 e'4 ) | % 6
  e4 r2 \! }
>> }

Fourth movement[edit]

The movement opens quietly with the second violins playing an eighth-note accompaniment and the first violins playing a descending scale:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative as'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo "Mehr schnell" 2 = 95
  R1 | % 2
  r2 \p r4 as8 r8 | % 3
  g8 r8 f8 _\markup{ \italic {dim.} } r8 es8 r8 d8 r8 | % 4
  c8 r8 r4 r2
  }
\new Staff \relative g' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2
  r8 \p g8 ( fis8 g8 as8 g8
  fis8 g8 ) | % 2
  as8 ( -> g8 fis8 g8 ) fis8 ( g8 f8 g8 ) | % 3
  es8 ( g8 f8 _\markup{ \italic {dim.} } g8 ) fis8 ( g8 f8 g8 ) | % 4
  es8 g8 ( fis8 g8 as8 -> g8 fis8 g8 ) }
>> }

This leads to the second theme of the first theme group, a loud passage given by the full orchestra that will recur as the main theme of the third theme group:


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative c'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 2 = 95
  \once \override TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <c c'>8 \ff <g g'>8 <d' d'>8
  }
  <c c'>4 r4 <as as'>4 | % 2
  \once \override TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <g g'>8 <d d'>8 <es es'>8
  }
  <c c'>4 r4 es4 | % 3
  \clef "bass" \once \override TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <d, d'>8 <c c'>8 <d d'>8
  }
  <g, g'>4 <d' d'>4 <es es'>4 | % 4
  <d d'>2. <f f'>4 | % 5
  \once \override TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <es es'>8 <d d'>8 <es es'>8
  }
  <g, g'>4 <es' es'>4 <f f'>4 | % 6
  <es es'>2. r4
  }
\new Staff \relative g { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key c \minor \clef treble \time 2/2
  \once \override
  TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <g c es g c>8 \ff <g c es g c>8 <g c es g c>8
  }
  <g c es g c>4 r4 <c c'>4 | % 2
  \once \override TupletBracket #'stencil = ##f
  \times 2/3  {
    <g c es g c>8 <g c es g c>8 <g c es g c>8
  }
  <g c es g c>4 r4 es''4 d4 g,4 d'4 es4 | % 4
  d4 g,4 d'4 f4 | % 5
  es4 g,4 es'4 f4 | % 6
  es4 r4 r2 }
>> }

The quiet opening returns after this and leads into the A major second theme group, called "Schubertian" by Georg Tintner:[5]


{ \new PianoStaff <<
\new Staff \relative cis'' { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key a \major \clef treble \time 2/2 \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \tempo 2 = 90
  cis4 \pp ( d4 cis4 e,4 ) | % 2
  d4 ( b'4 cis,4 a'4 ) | % 3
  gis4 ( a4 gis4 b,4 ) | % 4
  a4 ( fis'4 gis,4 e'4 )
  }
\new Staff \relative a, { \set Staff.midiInstrument = #"piano" \key a \major \clef bass \time 2/2
  a4 \pp ^"pizz." r4 a'4 r4 | % 2
  e4 r4 a,4 r4 | % 3
  e4 r4 e'4 r4 | % 4
  b4 r4 e,4 r4 }
>> }

The exposition closes with a quote of the Kyrie of the F minor Mass. The development contains what William Carragan refers to as "fantasies" on the first and second theme groups.[6] The recapitulation begins with the loud secondary theme of the first group before moving into the quieter first theme. Among other cuts between versions, one of note is in the coda of the movement. In the original version the coda is in two phases; a buildup leading to quotations of the first movement and the second theme group of this movement. This leads to the second phase, another buildup leading to the grand peroration in C major that closes the symphony. The first of these phases is cut in the second version, leaving only the final buildup and peroration.

Versions[edit]

The composer made two versions of this symphony recognised by the Internationale Bruckner-Gesellschaft (1872 and 1877). The work was also adjusted by the composer right before its premiere, as well as in 1876 and 1892.

First Version, 1872[edit]

This was published in a 2005 edition by William Carragan under the auspices of the Internationale Bruckner-Gesellschaft in 2005.[6] The Scherzo comes second; the slow movement follows. Georg Tintner: “Bruckner’s mania for revision sometimes bore positive fruits … [but with] the Second and the Third [symphonies] his first versions seem to me the best.”[5]

Bruckner made adjustments preparing for the 1873 premiere.

  • First movement: Rhythmic trombones were added on bars 129-135 and 446-452.
  • Adagio: In the fifth section a solo violin was added from bar 150. During the rehearsal, violin soloist Heinz Haunold told: "… the violin solo at that point of the movement effectively prevented the orchestra from rising to the great climax … but it also contained a fatal trap for the performers of the symphony."[7]

    The violin solo … in duple quarters and duple eighths, … together with the rhythmic complexities already caused by the shift from sextuplets to quintuplets in the first violins, … must have created an amazingly detailed sound – not to say an impenetrable musical fog."[7]

    In the coda, the solo horn, which was considered unplayable by the horn-player, was replaced by the first clarinet and the viola section.
  • Scherzo: The repeats were deleted.
  • Finale: A "very dissonant section of the development",[6] which includes at one point a striking alternation of short viola notes with pizzicato chords in the rest of the strings, was removed. These original bold and adventurous bars 305-360 were substituted for a new, 24-bar, very charming "Neuer Satz" (new passage).[8]
    In the peroration, a fourth trombone is added to enhance the contrabass part.

In 1876, Bruckner made additional, smaller changes prior the second performance, which occurred on 20 February 1876 in the Musikvereinsaal under Bruckner's baton.
Bruckner made mainly cuts in the coda of the first movement, and in the development of the second theme and the coda of the Finale. The peroration of the Finale is recomposed and the additional trombone is removed.[8]

Second Version, 1877[edit]

Bruckner crossed out the second half of section 2 of the slow movement, judged too difficult for the solo horn – with as a result, an imbalance in the structure of the movement,[4] and re-orchestrated its section 5. He also made additional cuts in the first movement and the Finale, and dropped the “Neuer Satz“ and substituted it for an 18-bar long, new material.

  • Haas edition (1938): this edition is based on the 1877 version, with, however, some features of the first version.
  • Nowak edition (1965): this edition still contains some residues of the Haas' "mixed version".
  • Carragan edition (2007): this edition is a corrected Nowak edition.[9]
In his edition Carragan put the crossed-out second half of section 2 of the slow movement as optional :

In my edition of the Second I kept that music in the score, and borrowing from Haas marked it with a “vide”, to be retained at the conductor’s option. In the preface I point out that if the pure 1877 version of the symphony is desired, the cut must be made, but some conductors are keeping the music and in my opinion as a listener, the effect is better.[4]

1892 version[edit]

This, the first published edition of the symphony, was prepared by Cyrill Hynais and was until recently thought to be inauthentic, but Carragan has shown that it corresponds closely to the 1877 version. This version was performed on 25 November 1894 by the Vienna Philharmonic under Hans Richter.

Discography[edit]

The first recording of any part of the symphony was made by Fritz Zaun with the Berlin State Opera Orchestra in 1934: a cut version of the Scherzo in the 1892 first published edition. The oldest surviving complete performance is by Georg-Ludwig Jochum with the Bruckner Orchestra of Linz, dating from 1944 and using the Haas edition. The first commercial recording was by Volkmar Andreae with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra in 1953, also using the Haas edition.

First Version, 1872[edit]

Carragan's edition
1873 variant
  • Kurt Eichhorn conducting the Bruckner Orchestra Linz, 1991, Camerata
1876 variant
  • Kurt Eichhorn conducting the Bruckner Orchestra Linz, abruckner.com BSVD-0103
NB: composite recording prepared in 2007 by William Carragan and John Berky, using the three Camarata recordings (15CM-380, 30CM-195 and 30CM-196) conducted by Kurt Eichhorn

Second Version, 1877[edit]

Haas' (mixed) edition
Nowak's edition
Carragan's edition

Daniel Barenboim conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, 1997 (using a pre-publ. Carragan ed.) - Teldec CD 3984 21485-2

A few other recent recordings use also the Carragan's edition:

1892 version[edit]

A few recordings use this first edition:

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Anton Bruckner, Sämtliche Werke, Kritische Gesamtausgabe – Band 2: II. Symphonie c-Moll (Originalfassung), Musikwissenschaftlicher Verlag der internationalen Bruckner-Gesellschaft, Robert Haas (Editor), Vienna, 1938
  • Anton Bruckner: Sämtliche Werke: Band II: II. Symphonie c-Moll, Musikwissenschaftlicher Verlag der Internationalen Bruckner-Gesellschaft, Vienna
    • II/1: Fassung 1872, William Carragan (Editor), 2005
    • II/2: Fassung 1877, Leopold Nowak (Editor), 1965; new edition by William Carragan, 2007

External links[edit]