Syracuse, Chenango and New York Railroad

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Syracuse, Chenango and New York Railroad
Locale Syracuse, New York to Earlville
Dates of operation 1868–1883
Successor Syracuse, Ontario and New York Railway
later part of New York Central Railroad (NYCRR)
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge

The Syracuse and Chenango Valley Railroad was incorporated April 16, 1868, and had routes through the Chenango Valley from the city of Syracuse in Onondaga County to the village of Earlville in Madison County, a distance of 45.49 miles (73.21 km).[1] It was renamed to Syracuse and Chenango Railroad in 1873 and into Syracuse, Chenango and New York Railroad in 1877.[2]

During 1883, the road merged into Syracuse, Ontario and New York Railway and by 1891 became part of New York Central Railroad (NYCRR).[3]

History[edit]

The Syracuse, Chenango and New York Railroad was incorporated April 7, 1877, as successor of the Syracuse and Chenango Railroad, which was incorporated May 14, 1873, and sold March 17, 1877. The Syracuse and Chenango Company was the successor of Syracuse and Chenango Valley Railroad, incorporated April 16, 1868, road opened February 1873, and sold July 8, 1873.[3]

During 1879, the company's main office was located at the corner of Smith and Canal streets in Syracuse.[4]

Company management[edit]

In 1879, J. J. Belden was company receiver and A. C. Belden was the manager. J. Sherman was treasurer, A. D. Allen was superintendent and A. D. Peck was the dispatcher. Master mechanic was George W. West.[4]

Syracuse, Ontario and New York railway[edit]

During 1883, the road merged into Syracuse, Ontario and New York Railway and by 1891, it became part of New York Central Railroad (NYCRR).[3] The road had been sold under foreclosure.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Railroad Lines here in 1839 Merged into Central". Syracuse Journal. Syracuse, New York. March 20, 1939. 
  2. ^ a b Poor, Henry Varnum. Manual of the railroads of the United States, Volume 22. Poors, 1889 p. 85; 317. Retrieved February 4, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "New York Central Railroad, Annual Report". New York Central System, 1913. Retrieved February 14, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Boyd's Syracuse Boyd's City Directory 1879. Andrew Boyd, 1879.