Syrians in Germany

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Syrians in Germany
Syrer in Deutschland
Total population
0.7 million (0.85% of the total population)[1]
Regions with significant populations
Berlin, Frankfurt, Hanover, Munich, Stuttgart
Languages
Arabic, Kurdish, Turkish, Neo-Aramaic, German
Religion
Majority Islam (mainly Sunni Islam, minorities Twelver Shia Islam, Alevism, Alawites, Sufism, Isma'ilism)
Christianity (mainly Syriac Orthodox Church, minorities Eastern Catholic Churches, Oriental Orthodoxy)
Druze
Atheism

Syrians in Germany refers to Syrian immigrants to Germany, as well as their descendants. This includes Arabs, Kurds, Turks, Assyrians as well as smaller minorities from Syria. The number of Syrians in Germany is estimated at around 600,000 people in December 2016 and consists mainly of refugees of the Syrian Civil War.[2] Some other sources claim 200,000 estimated Syrian citizens to reside within Germany as of September 2015.[3] Among the German districts Bonn and Wiesbaden had the highest shares of Syrian migrants in 2011 according to German Census data. [4]

In 2015, fake Syrian passports were being used by non-Syrians in the hopes of fraudulently gaining legal residency in Europe.[5][6]

Migration history[edit]

During the European migrant crisis of 2014-2015 hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees of the Syrian Civil War entered Germany to seek refugee status. The European migrant crisis was especially accelerated when on 4 September 2015, Chancellor Werner Faymann of Austria, in conjunction with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, announced that migrants would be allowed to cross the border from Hungary into Austria and onward to Germany, and early on 5 September 2015, buses with migrants began crossing the Austro-Hungarian border.[7][8]

As of 31 December 2014, the Federal Statistical Office of Germany estimates that there were 118,196 people with Syrian citizenship in Germany.[9] According to the German Interior Ministry, between January 2015 and October 2015, there were 243,721 Syrian citizens who entered Germany to seek asylum.[10] Therefore, there are more than 360,000 Syrian citizens (combined 118,196 as of December 2014 and 243,721 as of October 2015) residing in Germany as of October 2015.

As of 31 December, 2016, The total number of Syrians in Germany reached 637,845.[1]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Anzahl der Ausländer in Deutschland nach Herkunftsland in den Jahren 2015 und 2016". statista (in German).
  2. ^ Matthias Meissner (30 March 2015). "Kriegsflüchtlinge aus Syrien - Linke und Gruene warnen vor Abschottung". Tagesspiegel. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  3. ^ Thomas Frankenfeld (5 September 2015). "Darum sind so viele syrische Flüchtlinge gebildet". Hamburger Abendblatt. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  4. ^ "Kartenseite: Syrer in Deutschland - Landkreise". kartenseite.wordpress.com. 2017-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-14.
  5. ^ "Germany seizes fake Syrian passports in asylum inquiry". BBC News. 2015-09-04. Retrieved 2016-09-10.
  6. ^ Mesco, Manuela (2015-09-12). "Migrants Pose as Syrians to Open Door to Asylum in Europe". WSJ. Retrieved 2016-09-10.
  7. ^ Rick Lyman; Anemona Hartocollis & Alison Smale (4 September 2015). "Migrants Cross Austria Border From Hungary". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 September 2015.
  8. ^ "The Latest: Austria, Germany to accept bused migrants". msn.com.
  9. ^ "Bevölkerung und Erwerbstätigkeit" (PDF). Statistische Bundesamt. 16 March 2015. p. 39. Retrieved 6 November 2015.
  10. ^ "Anhaltend hoher Asyl-Zugang im Oktober 2015". 5 November 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2015.