Szczecin Shipyard

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Stocznia Szczecińska
Nowa Sp. z o.o.
IndustryShipbuilding
Founded1948 (as Stocznia Szczecińska)
Headquarters,
ServicesShipbuilding
Ship repair
Websitehttp://stocznia-szczecinska.pl/en/
Szczecin Shipyard in Szczecin, Poland

Szczecin Shipyard or New Szczecin Shipyard (Polish: Stocznia Szczecińska Nowa) was a shipyard in the city of Szczecin, Poland. Formerly known as Stocznia Szczecińska Porta Holding S.A. (until 2002) or Stocznia im. Adolfa Warskiego. The shipyard specialized in the construction of container ships, chemicals transport ships, multi-purpose ships and Con-Ro ships. It employed about 4400 people, and the executive director was Andrzej Markowski. It had the ISO 9001:2000 certificate.

History[edit]

It was founded in the aftermath of World War II, when the important German port of Stettin was taken over by Poland and renamed Szczecin. The state-owned shipyard then inherited the assets of the former German shipbuilding giant AG Vulcan Stettin.

In the 1970s and 1980s, the shipyard was one of the most important centers of anticommunist resistance in Poland (see: Polish 1970 protests, Solidarity).

It was the 5th biggest shipyard in Europe and the 40th in the world.[citation needed]

In 2009, the Polish government contracted the sale of Szczecin Shipyard and Gdynia shipyards to QInvest of Qatar.[1] However, by September the deal had fallen apart, and the government started looking for new investors.[2][3]

Szczecin Industrial Park[edit]

Since 2009, Szczecin Industrial Park (Stocznia Szczecińska) has been created[when?] on the site of the former Szczecin Shipyard in the north-east of Szczecin.[4] The 45-hectare site, about two kilometres from the city centre is well equipped shipbuilding and ship repair, with 3 slipways (Wulkan Nowy, Odra Nowa and Wulkan Stary), 750 m of quays, 80 000 sqm of prefabrication yards and over 10 ha of warehouses.[5] The assets are owned by MARS Closed Investment Fund.[6]

The type and number of units produced until 1998[edit]

Ships built until 1998
Type Number of projects Number of vessels passed DWT (in total)
1 Bulk carrier 11 79 2181,3
2 Cargo ship 1 41 130,2
3 General cargo ship 17 143 1156,6
4 Szkolno-towarowy 1 13 71,6
5 Semikontenerowiec 4 25 382,3
6 Container ship 7 97 1701,8
7 Chemical tanker 2 13 342,5
8 Produktowiec 4 11 400,3
9 Cargo-passenger 4 17 97,1
10 Ferry 3 11 17,9
11 Road ferry 1 4 3,2
12 Scientific research 2 12 16.5
13 Geophysical 1 9 11,8
14 Research vessel 2 17 96,6
15 Hospital ship 1 4 13,6
16 Repair ship 4 40 185,4
17 Powership 1 4 24,6
18 Anchor handling tug supply vessel 2 48 66,3
19 Crane vessel 40t 1 4 1,1
20 Container crane 300t 1 1 1,6
21 Rocket-artillery training ship 1 3 21,9
22 Landing craft 1 1 4,5
Total 71 597 6928,8

References[edit]

  1. ^ "QInvest wants to delay Poland shipyards payment". Gulf Base. 25 July 2009. Archived from the original on 2011-10-04. Retrieved 2011-01-21.
  2. ^ "Shipyards in Trouble… Again". Krakow Post. 20 August 2009. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  3. ^ "The Polish Economy in 2009". Krakow Post. 5 January 2010. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  4. ^ "Stocznia Szczecińska". Stocznia Szczecińska. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  5. ^ "Szczecin Shipyard". MS Mutual Funds Society. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  6. ^ "Szczecin Industrial Park emerging as reborn Szczecin Shipyard". Poland at Sea. 14 February 2017. Retrieved 21 August 2020.