TÜBİTAK National Observatory

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TÜBİTAK National Observatory
TÜBITAK Ulusal Gozlemevi
Tübitak Ulusal Gözlemevi.jpg
TÜBİTAK National Observatory at Bakırtepe, Antalya Province, Turkey
OrganizationScientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey
Observatory codeA84 Edit this on Wikidata
LocationBakırtepe, Antalya, Turkey
Coordinates36°49′27″N 30°20′8″E / 36.82417°N 30.33556°E / 36.82417; 30.33556Coordinates: 36°49′27″N 30°20′8″E / 36.82417°N 30.33556°E / 36.82417; 30.33556
Altitude2,450 m (8,040 ft)
Websitewww.tug.tubitak.gov.tr
Telescopes
RTT150Cassegrain
T100 (ACE RC1.0)Ritchey–Chrétien
T60 (OMI RC06)Ritchey–Chrétien
YT40 (Meade LX200GPS)Schmidt–Cassegrain
ROTSEIIIDRobotic Optical Transient Search Experiment
TÜBİTAK National Observatory is located in Turkey
TÜBİTAK National Observatory
Location of TÜBİTAK National Observatory
TÜBITAK Ulusal Gozlemevi

TÜBİTAK National Observatory (Turkish: TÜBİTAK Ulusal Gozlemevi, TUG) is a ground-based astronomical observatory operated by the TUG Institute of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK). Established in 1991, it is located at an altitude of 2,450 m (8,040 ft) in Bakırtepe, around 50 km (31 mi) west-southwest of Antalya in southern Turkey.

There are five telescopes installed in Bakırtepe:

Discoveries[edit]

Scientists led by a Turkish astronomer from Ankara University discovered an exoplanet orbiting the giant star HD 208897, which is located at a distance of some 210 light years from the Earth.[8] The exoplanet has a minimum mass of 1.4 Jupiter masses, and rotates its parent star from about 1.05 AU (156,000,000 km (97,000,000 mi)) away in every 353 days on a nearly circular orbit. The discovery is the result of a ten-year-long research work of precise radial-velocity method carried out by using the Coude Echelle Spectrograph (CES) installed on the 1.5-meter Russian-Turkish Telescope (RTT150). Follow-up observations at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO) in Japan and the Ankara University Kreiken Observatory (AUKR) confirmed the discovery, which was made public on August 6, 2017.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "RTT150 Teleskobu" (in Turkish). TUG-TÜBİTAK. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  2. ^ "RTT150 Russian-Turkish 1.5-m Telescope". Head Iki. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  3. ^ "T100 Teleskobu" (in Turkish). TUG-TÜBİTAK. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  4. ^ "T60 Teleskobu" (in Turkish). TUG-TÜBİTAK. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  5. ^ "YT40 Teleskobu (2006-2008)" (in Turkish). TUG-TÜBİTAK. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  6. ^ "LX200 Series". Meade Instruments. Archived from the original on 2013-01-19. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  7. ^ "ROTSEIIID Teleskobu" (in Turkish). TUG-TÜBİTAK. Retrieved 2013-02-18.
  8. ^ "Turkish scientists discover a planet for the first time". Daily Sabah. 2017-08-13. Retrieved 2017-08-21.
  9. ^ Nowakowski, Tomasz report (2017-08-10). "Jupiter-mass planet orbiting giant star discovered". PHYS ORG. Retrieved 2017-08-21.