Tāmaki Makaurau

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Tāmaki Makaurau electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Tāmaki Makaurau is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the House of Representatives of New Zealand. It was first formed for the 2002 election. The electorate covers the Auckland area and was first held by Labour's John Tamihere before going to Dr Pita Sharples of the Māori Party for three terms from 2005 to 2014. After Sharples' retirement, the electorate was won by Peeni Henare of the Labour Party in the 2014 election.

Population centres[edit]

In its current boundaries, Tāmaki Makaurau contains the Western Beaches of Waitakere City, all of West Auckland south of Te Atatu, the entire Auckland Isthmus, and the South Auckland suburbs of Mangere, Ōtara, Pakuranga and Manurewa. It does not contain Great Barrier or Rangitoto islands, as they are in Te Tai Tokerau; both Papakura and Waiheke Island are in Hauraki-Waikato.[1]

In the review of boundaries in 2007, the southern part of Manurewa shifted from Tāmaki Makaurau to the Hauraki-Waikato electorate.[2] The 2013/14 redistribution did not further alter the boundaries of the electorate.[3]

Tribal areas[edit]

The main iwi of Tāmaki Makaurau are Ngāti Whātua, Kawerau a Maki, Tainui, Ngāti Pāoa, Wai-O-Hua and Ngāti Rehua,[4] though a pan-Māori organisation called Ngāti Akarana exists for urbanised Māori with no knowledge of their actual iwi; and, through a population trend whereby many rural Māori moved to the cities, the largest iwi affiliation in the seat are Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Waikato and Ngāti Maniapoto, all iwi local to other areas of New Zealand.[5]

History[edit]

Tāmaki Makaurau derives its name from the Māori name for Auckland; it is often translated as "Tāmaki of a thousand lovers" (Makau, often translated as lovers, also translates as favourite and spouse, implying a highly sought target of admiration), a reference to the fertile volcanic soil of Auckland and the positioning between two resource-rich coasts.[6]

Tāmaki Makaurau was formed for the 2002 election from the northern part of the Hauraki electorate. John Tamihere of the Labour Party was the representative for Hauraki, and he also won the first election in the Tāmaki Makaurau electorate in 2002. Tamihere spent his six-year parliamentary career dogged by controversy that often overshadowed his work as a minister and, at the 2005 election came ten percent behind Māori Party co-leader Pita Sharples. Because Tamihere had chosen not to seek a list placing, his parliamentary career was terminated. Sharples remained the current representative for the electorate until his retirement,[7] when the Labour's Peeni Henare won the seat.[8]

Members of Parliament for Tāmaki Makaurau[edit]

Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at a general election.

Key

 Labour    Māori    Green  

Election Winner
2002 election John Tamihere
2005 election Pita Sharples
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election Peeni Henare

List MPs from Tāmaki Makaurau[edit]

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Tāmaki Makaurau electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
2002 election Metiria Turei
2011 Louisa Wall1
2011 election Shane Jones
2015 Marama Davidson2

1Wall was elected from the party list in April 2011 following the resignation of Darren Hughes.
2Davidson was elected from the party list in November 2015 following the resignation of Russel Norman.

Election results[edit]

2014 election[edit]

General election, 2014: Tāmaki Makaurau[9]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Peeni Henare 7,533 37.48 +2.39 8,432 40.45 -1.05
Māori Rangi McLean 6,071 30.21 -10.19 2,651 12.72 -2.73
Green Marama Davidson 3,136 15.60 +7.14 2,438 11.69 +1.98
Mana Kereama Pene 2,624 13.06 -2.98
Independent Raewyn Harrison 317 1.58 +1.58
NZ First   2,914 13.98 +3.53
Internet Mana   2,234 10.72 -2.96
National   1,575 7.55 -0.86
Legalise Cannabis   200 0.96 -0.10
Conservative   128 0.61 +0.11
ACT   39 0.19 +0.04
United Future   16 0.08 +0.03
Focus   6 0.03 +0.03
Ban 1080   5 0.02 +0.02
Independent Coalition   4 0.02 +0.02
Democrats   1 0.005 -0.005
Civilian   1 0.005 +0.005
Informal votes 417 204
Total Valid votes 20,098 20,848
Labour gain from Māori Majority 1,462 7.27 +1.96

2011 election[edit]

General election, 2011: Tāmaki Makaurau[10]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Māori Green tickY Pita Sharples 7,120 40.40 -25.58 2,694 14.45 -14.16
Labour Shane Jones 6,184 35.09 +7.75 7,739 41.50 -8.23
Mana Kereama Pene 2,827 16.04 +16.04 2,551 13.68 +13.68
Green Mikaere Curtis 1,491 8.46 +3.69 1,810 9.71 +5.67
NZ First   1,948 10.45 +4.56
National   1,569 8.41 +1.00
Legalise Cannabis   197 1.06 -0.08
Conservative   94 0.50 +0.50
ACT   28 0.15 -0.53
United Future   10 0.05 -0.08
Libertarianz   4 0.02 +0.01
Alliance   2 0.01 -0.01
Democrats   2 0.01 +0.01
Informal votes 717 327
Total Valid votes 17,622 18,648
Māori hold Majority 936 5.31 -33.33

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 35,347[11]

2008 election[edit]

General election, 2008: Tāmaki Makaurau[5][12]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Māori Green tickY Pita Sharples 12,876 65.98 +13.63 5,801 28.61 +1.13
Labour Louisa Wall 5,336 27.34 -13.90 10,084 49.73 -5.41
Green Mikaere Curtis 931 4.77 819 4.04 -2.55
Kiwi Vapi Kupenga 129 0.66 28 0.14
Independent Kane Te Waaka 122 0.63
Independent Marama Nathan 120 0.61
National   1,504 7.42 +3.39
NZ First   1,193 5.88 +0.56
Family Party   284 1.40
Legalise Cannabis   230 1.13 +0.42
ACT   137 0.68 +0.47
Bill and Ben   71 0.35
Progressive   38 0.19 -0.15
Pacific   36 0.18
United Future   27 0.13 -0.31
RAM   10 0.05
Workers Party   10 0.05
Alliance   5 0.02 -0.05
Libertarianz   2 0.01 -0.01
Democrats   0 0.00 -0.01
RONZ   0 0.00 -0.01
Informal votes 480 247
Total Valid votes 19,514 20,279
Turnout 20,823 58.48 -3.57
Māori hold Majority 7,540 38.64 +27.53

2005 election[edit]

General election, 2005: Tamaki Makaurau[13]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Māori Pita Sharples 10,024 52.35 5,457 27.48
Labour Red XN John Tamihere 7,897 41.24 -32.11 10,951 55.14
Destiny Tauwehi Hemahema-Tāmati 675 3.53 520 2.62
NZ First   1,057 5.32
National   801 4.03
Green   652 3.28
Legalise Cannabis   141 0.71
United Future   87 0.44
Progressive   67 0.34
ACT   42 0.21
Family Rights   20 0.10
Direct Democracy   18 0.09
Christian Heritage   14 0.07
Alliance   13 0.07
99 MP   9 0.05
One NZ   5 0.03
Libertarianz   3 0.02
Democrats   1 0.01
RONZ   1 0.01
Informal votes 363 199
Total Valid votes 19,147 19,859
Turnout 20,440 62.05 +7.83
Māori gain from Labour Majority 2,127 11.11

2002 election[edit]

General election, 2002: Tamaki Makaurau[5]

Notes: Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour John Tamihere 11,445 73.35 9,052 55.97
Green Metiria Turei 2,001 12.82 1,659 10.26
National George Rongokino Ngatai 785 5.03 516 3.19
Alliance Janice Smith 550 3.52 470 2.91
Christian Heritage Tuhimareikura Vaha'akolo 472 3.02 240 1.48
Progressive Sue Wharewhaka-Topia Watts 351 2.25 228 1.41
NZ First   2,430 15.03
Mana Māori   464 2.87
Legalise Cannabis   423 2.62
United Future   411 2.54
ACT   223 1.38
ORNZ   51 0.32
One NZ   4 0.02
NMP   2 0.01
Informal votes 380 122
Total Valid votes 15,604 16,173
Turnout 16,688 54.22
Labour win new seat Majority 9,444 60.52

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Find my Electorate". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 
  2. ^ Report of the Representation Commission 2007 (PDF). Representation Commission. 14 September 2007. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-477-10414-2. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  3. ^ Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-477-10414-2. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  4. ^ "Tāmaki Makaurau". Te Puni Kōkiri. 6 March 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c "Tāmaki Makaurau - Electorate Profile" (PDF). New Zealand Parliamentary Library. September 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 
  6. ^ "Victoria Park management plan". Auckland City Council. Archived from the original on 19 October 2008. Retrieved 12 September 2014.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  7. ^ "Hon Dr Pita Sharples". New Zealand Parliament. 22 September 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  8. ^ Ropiha, Billie Jo (20 September 2014). "Peeni Henare presents humble victory speech". Māori Television. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  9. ^ "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2016. 
  10. ^ "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 
  11. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 
  13. ^ "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 12 September 2014. 

Coordinates: 36°50′25″S 174°44′24″E / 36.8404°S 174.7399°E / -36.8404; 174.7399