TM-170

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TM-170[1]
TM 170 armored personnel carrier.jpg
A TM-170 in use with the German police. Note the obstacle clearing blade and flashing lights
Type armored personnel carrier
Place of origin  Germany
Service history
Used by Germany (Federal Police), Kuwait, Macedonia, Luxembourg, Spain, Austria, Indonesia, South Korea
Production history
Designer Thyssen-Henschel (acquired by Rheinmetall Landsysteme)
Manufacturer Rheinmetall Landsysteme
Produced 1979
Specifications
Weight 8.8 - 11.9 tonnes
Length 6.14 m
Width 2.47 m
Height 2.32 m
Crew 2+10

Armor 8mm steel
Main
armament
optional
Engine Daimler-Benz OM366
179 kw (240 hp)
Suspension 4x4
Operational
range
870 km
Speed 100 km/h (road) 9 km/h (water)

The TM-170 is an armored personnel carrier for military and police demands from Germany. It was designed in 1979 by Thyssen-Henschel (now a subsidiary of Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbH), and is currently produced as needed.[2]

Operators[edit]

As Sonderwagen 4 (special wagon) the TM-170 is mainly used by Bereitschaftspolizei groups and airport security of german State and Federal Police. In addition it is also in service with Kuwait and Macedonia.[2]

Design[edit]

The TM-170 is based on the Unimog chassis.

Usage[edit]

The TM-170 is designed to transport troops under light armor protection. It is capable of amphibious travel at a speed of 9 km/h, or of travel on land at a speed of up to 100 km/h.[1] The vehicle is modular, and can be fitted with equipment protecting against NBC threats, night vision, an obstacle clearing blade, or flashing lights, among other things.[1]

Armament[edit]

Armament on the TM-170 is optional. Among other possibilities, it is capable of being equipped with twin 7.62mm machine guns or a 20mm turret.[1]

3. Christopher F. Foss: Jane's Tanks Recognition Guide. HarperCollins Publishers, New York 2006. pgs. 252-253

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Christopher F. Foss: Janes Tanks and Combat Vehicles Recognition Guide. HarperCollins Publishers. New York, 2002. p.258
  2. ^ a b Christopher F. Foss: Janes Tanks and Combat Vehicles Recognition Guide. HarperCollins Publishers. New York, 2002. p.259