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TMS Entertainment

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TMS Entertainment Co., Ltd.
Native name
株式会社トムス・エンタテインメント
Kabushiki-gaisha Tomusu Entateinmento
Formerly
  • Asahi Gloves Manufacturing
  • Kyokuichi Knitting & Weaving
  • Kyokuichi Shine Industries
  • Kyokuichi
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryAnime
PredecessorTokyo Movie Shinsha
FoundedOctober 22, 1946; 77 years ago (1946-10-22) (as Asahi Gloves)
January 1, 2000; 24 years ago (2000-01-01) (as TMS Entertainment)
Headquarters,
Japan
Key people
Number of employees
256 (2018)
ParentSega
Divisions
  • 3xCube
  • 8PAN
  • Double Eagle
  • V1 Studio
  • Trois Studio
Subsidiaries
  • Telecom Animation Film
  • Toon Additional Pictures
  • Toon Harbor Works
  • Toms Photo
  • TMS Music
  • TMS Jinni's
  • TMS Entertainment USA
  • TMS Entertainment Europe
Websitewww.tms-e.co.jp/global/
Footnotes / references
[1][2][3]

TMS Entertainment Co., Ltd. (株式会社トムス・エンタテインメント, Kabushiki-gaisha Tomusu Entateinmento), formerly known as the Kyokuichi Tokyo Movie[a] division or TMS-Kyokuichi is a Japanese animation studio.

TMS is one of the oldest and most renowned animation studios in Japan, known for its numerous anime franchises such as Detective Conan, Lupin the Third, and Anpanman.[4]

TMS Entertainment is the animation business company of the Sega Group and a well-established animation studio with its origins in Tokyo Movie. It was formed when Kyokuichi Co., Ltd., which was originally a knitting and textile manufacturing company, merged with animation studio Tokyo Movie Shinsha to start an animation business and changed its name.[b][3][4] Tokyo Movie Shinsha was one of the five major studios in the early days of Japanese animation, producing and/or animating a string of popular works from the 1960s to the 1970s, including Obake no Q-Tarō, Star of the Giants, Moomin, Attack No. 1, Tensai Bakabon, Lupin the 3rd Part I, Aim for the Ace!, and Gamba no Bouken.[5]

TMS has studios 1 through 7 under its production headquarters, each with a nickname for the work they are involved in, such as V1 Studio, 3xCube, Trois Studios, Rogue Studio, and Double Eagle. Each studio has its own production and management staff, including producers and production assistants. As for animators, each studio contracts them on a work-by-work basis. However, head creators sometimes have exclusive contracts and are given their own desks within the company to work on.[3]

In addition to its own studios, TMS has group production companies such as Telecom Animation Film and TMS Jinni's.[4]

Throughout the 1980s and the 1990s, TMS and its subsidiaries, Telecom Animation Film and South Korea-based Seoul Movie, animated for various companies, including DiC, Walt Disney Television Animation, Warner Bros. Animation, Marvel Films Animation, Studio Ghibli, Madhouse, Production I.G, Sunrise, Bones, ShoPro, Shogakukan Music & Digital Entertainment among others,[6] Since the early 2000s, TMS itself has no longer supplied animation services to western studios due to increasingly demanding costs,[6][7] although there have been a few exceptions such as Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) and Superman vs. The Elite (2012). While it still produces feature films, these films are primarily spinoffs from existing anime properties, which include the likes of Anpanman and Detective Conan.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Prehistory of TMS Entertainment (Kyokuichi)[edit]

In 1946, Asahi Glove Manufacturing Co., Ltd. (アサヒ手袋製造株式会社, Asahi Tebukuro Seizō Kabushiki-gaisha) was founded in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture and the trade name was soon changed to Kyokuichi Knitting & Weaving Co., Ltd. (旭一編織株式会社, Kyokuichi Amiori Kabushiki-gaisha).[1] The company changed its name to Kyokuichi Co., Ltd. (株式会社キョクイチ, Kabushiki-gaisha Kyokuichi) in 1947, and then to Kyokuichi Shine Industries Co., Ltd. (旭一シャイン工業株式会社, Kyokuichi Shain Kōgyō Kabushiki-gaisha) in 1957, and was listed on the Nagoya Stock Exchange. The company established Shine Mink Co., Ltd. in Sapporo, Hokkaido in 1961, opened a mink breeding farm and began its fur business in 1962, and merged with Shine Mink in 1974 to form the Mink Division. In 1989, Kyokuichi Shine Industries was acquired by Watchman Group, a mass retail group of watches and home appliances, and changed its business format to entertainment business.

Prehistory of TMS Entertainment (Tokyo Movie Shinsha)[edit]

Tokyo Movie Shinsha Co., Ltd.
Native name
株式会社東京ムービー新社
Company typePrivate (1964-1991)
Subsidiary (1991-1995)
IndustryAnime
Animated series
PredecessorTokyo Movie Co., Ltd. (1964-1976)
Founded1964; 60 years ago (1964)
FounderYutaka Fujioka
DefunctNovember 1, 1995 (1995-11-01)
FateMerged with Kyokuichi
SuccessorKyokuichi Tokyo Movie Division/TMS-Kyokuichi
Headquarters,
Japan
Number of employees
235 (2020) Edit this on Wikidata
ParentSega (1991-1995)
Subsidiaries
  • Tokyo Movie
  • Telecom Animation Film
  • Toon Additional Pictures
  • Toon Harbor Works
  • TMS Entertainment, Inc.

In 1964, Yutaka Fujioka, a former staff of the puppet theater company Hitomi-za (人形劇団ひとみ座, Ningyō Gekidan Hitomi-za), established the animation studio Tokyo Movie Co., Ltd.[c] with investment from Tokyo Broadcasting System.[2][8][9] Inspired by the broadcast of the first domestically produced animated TV series Astro Boy on Fuji Television the previous year, TBS encouraged Fujioka, who was working at Tokyo Ningyo Cinema (東京人形シネマ, Tōkyō Ningyō Shinema), the film production division of Hitomi-za, which had produced puppet theater programs for the station, to establish a studio. The studio's first production was an animated adaptation of Osamu Tezuka's Big X.[2] However, because all the staff came from puppet theater backgrounds and were unfamiliar with animation, the studio suffered a huge loss and fell into financial crisis. In order to restore management, the studio received capital participation from the TV production company Kokusai Hōei (formerly Shintoho). Fujioka, the founder of the company, was demoted to director and head of the production department, and Rokuzo Abe of Kokusai Hōei was appointed as the new president.

In 1965, Fujioka established A Production to rebuild the production system, and Tokyo Movie formed a business alliance with A Production as an actual animation production company. Fujioka approached Daikichirō Kusube, who had left Toei Doga and was working as a freelancer, and by making him the representative of A Production, he succeeded in inviting talented Toei creators such as Tsutomu Shibayama, Yoshio Kabashima, and Keisuke Morishita. Fujioka also welcomed Isao Takahata, Hayao Miyazaki, Yasuo Ōtsuka, and Yōichi Kotabe, who had been forced out of Toei for overspending on The Great Adventure of Horus, Prince of the Sun.[10][11][12]

Early directors, such as Tadao Nagahama and Masaaki Ōsumi, were all from puppet theater companies with no animation experience, but they produced a series of hits, including Obake no Q-Tarō, Star of the Giants, and Attack No. 1. Thanks to them, Tokyo Movie became independent from Kokusai Hōei in 1971, and Fujioka returned as president. The studio continued to produce a string of hits thereafter, including Tensai Bakabon, Lupin the 3rd Part I, Aim for the Ace!, and Gamba no Bouken.[5]

Fujioka invested in Madhouse when it was founded in 1972.[citation needed]

In 1975, Tokyo Movie established Telecom Animation Film to train animators who could draw full animations.[13][14] Feeling the limitations of the Japanese animation business, Fujioka dreamed of expanding to the United States and making full animation films that could compete with Disney. However, since limited animation, which had been adopted and developed by Osamu Tezuka, was the mainstream in Japan, he planned to establish a new animation studio that would handle full animation and use it as a base to produce joint Japanese-US animated films.[5][13][14] Fujioka chose the legendary American cartoon Little Nemo as the basis for his animated film, and began acquiring the film rights in 1977.[13][14] Telecom received over 1,000 applications for its employee recruitment, and Fujioka hired 43 people with no animation production experience. Rather than hiring animators with limited animation production experience, Fujioka chose to hire inexperienced amateurs and train them to become first-class animators who could draw full animations. Telecom invited Sadao Tsukioka, who was considered a genius, as a lecturer for the first year, and Yasuo Ōtsuka the following year.[5]

In June 1976, Tokyo Movie spun off its sales division to establish Tokyo Movie Shinsha Co., Ltd.,[d], and the original Tokyo Movie became its production division.[2] A Production terminated its business alliance with Tokyo Movie, changed its name to Shin-Ei Animation, and began its own path.

In the summer of 1978, Fujioka acquired the film rights to Little Nemo.[5][14] However, due to difficulties in raising funds and securing staff, production was slow to begin, so Telecom produced TV series and movies under Ōtsuka, including Lupin the 3rd Part II.[14] Ōtsuka approached Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, with Miyazaki directing the second Lupin the 3rd film, The Castle of Cagliostro, and Takahata directing Jarinko Chie.[5] Fujioka frequently invited Hollywood film professionals to screen The two films to promote the production capabilities of Telecom and Japanese animation industry, which at the time was underrated in the United States. These films attracted attention, especially among young animators, including John Lasseter.[14] The event also drew an unexpected response, with Telecom receiving requests to produce a TV series from countries outside the U.S., including Italy.[15] In the U.S., the studio took on subcontracting work for production companies such as Disney, Warner Bros., and Filmation, and became proficient in the art of full animation.[16]

In the early 1980s, Tokyo Movie Shinsha (TMS) began working on international co-productions by big-name directors with the goal of expanding overseas.[17] TMS partnered with the French (later American) company DiC as an overseas subcontractor to produce animation for the company in 1980.[e] Two Japanese-French co-productions, Ulysses 31[f] in 1981, directed by Tadao Nagahama, and Lupin VIII[g] in 1982, directed by Rintaro, were produced in cooperation with DIC. TMS began production of the Japanese-Italian co-production TV series Sherlock Hound in 1981 at the request of RAI, the Italian national public broadcasting company. The series was directed by Hayao Miyazaki and animated by Telecom Animation Film.[17][18] However, the collaboration was dissolved after six episodes were produced, and the remaining 20 episodes were subsequently financed by Japanese companies. Kyosuke Mikuriya took over as director, and with Telecom leaving to focus on the film Nemo, TMS outsourced the animation to the fledgling studio Gallop.[18] Osamu Dezaki directed the largest number of animated co-productions, including Mighty Orbots,[h] Bionic Six, and Sweet Sea.[i][17]

In the spring of 1981, Fujioka received an investment from Lake, a consumer finance company, and established Kineto TMS, a U.S. incorporated company, to begin full-scale production of the film Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland.[5][15] The initial production budget was reported to be about 3.6 billion yen (16 million dollars at the exchange rate in 1981).[19] Under Fujioka's grand order to produce a world-class animation film, creators from Japan and abroad were assembled. Many prominent figures were involved in the production, including Hayao Miyazaki, Isao Takahata, Osamu Dezaki, Yasuo Ōtsuka, Ray Bradbury, Jean Giraud (Mobius), and Chris Columbus.[15][20][21] However, the production ran into difficulties due to various crosscurrents between Japan and the U.S. Miyazaki and Takahata, who were originally slated to direct the film, dropped out of the project, and the staff was replaced one by one in the following years.[13][19]

In 1982, Fujioka secured the cooperation of Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston from Disney's Nine Old Men. In the summer of that year, at their invitation, Miyazaki, Takahata, Ōtsuka, and other Japanese staff members visited the U.S. under the guise of training. While the Japanese staff members were greatly inspired by the two during their training, when the two saw the sketches drawn by Miyazaki, they said there was nothing they could teach them.[5][22] Young American animators who had heard rumors of the Nemo production also came to Kineto MS to sell themselves, including John Lasseter and Brad Bird, who reportedly met Miyazaki there for the first time. Bird brought in his own film and unofficially drew several image boards.[19][22] Fujioka succeeded in meeting George Lucas and asked him to be the American producer, but he declined, saying he was busy with the new Star Wars and Indiana Jones films, and instead recommended Gary Kurtz, who was also a producer on Star Wars.[5][13] Fujioka from Japan was appointed line producer, and Kurtz from the United States was appointed film producer.[13][15] Kurtz recommended Ray Bradbury as the screenwriter, and the project got underway.[5][15] When the Japanese production team was handed the first draft of Bradbury's screenplay, they wondered if it was too philosophical to be entertaining.[15] Miyazaki presented various ideas for the script to Kurtz, but he never adopted them.[j][5][22] Kurtz was executive producing Return to Oz for Disney at this time and spent most of his time in London and New York, visiting the site of Nemo in Los Angeles only once a month, and then for just a couple of hours in the afternoon.[23] Due to conflicts with Kurtz, Miyazaki resigned from Telecom in November 1982, and Takahata in March 1983.[5][22] Kurtz's dictatorship continued, and the project went astray. The directors changed one after another, and the team went all to bits. The production budget of 4.5 billion yen (19 million dollars at the 1984 rate) ran out before the animation work began, and the project was suspended in August 1984.[5][13][22]

In June 1988, TMS dissolved its own production division, Tokyo Movie and absorbed it.[2]

Fujioka resumed production after securing an additional investment of 1 billion yen (6.9 million dollars at the 1987 rate) from Lake in 1987 and terminated his contract with Kurtz and took full responsibility for the film, becoming executive producer himself.[13][22] The film was completed in 1988 and released in Japan in July 1989, and although it was not poorly received, it ended up grossing around 900 million yen (7 million dollars at the 1988 rate) at the box office.[13] It was released in the United States in 1992 in 2,300 theaters and sold 4 million videos, but the production costs were not recouped.[19][22] The film took about seven years to complete (it took 10 years for the U.S. release), and production costs eventually rose to 5.5 billion yen (43.3 million dollars at the 1992 rate).[20][21] The main staff changed constantly, and later left behind a vast number of ideas, designs, and sketches submitted by various creators,[k] scenarios by Bradley, Columbus, most of which were never used, and others, and pilots in three versions: Sadao Tsukioka's version, Yoshifumi Kondō and Kazuhide Tomonaga's version, and Osamu Desaki's version.[5][21] It was an unprecedented project in the history of Japanese animation, but it ended in failure, and Fujioka took responsibility for it, relinquished all rights related to Tokyo Movie, and retired from the industry.[10][13] Although Fujioka's ambitions ended in failure, Nemo left a great legacy, laying the foundation for the subsequent expansion of Japanese animation into the American market and also pioneering exchanges between Japan and the US in animation, such as the relationship between Miyazaki and the Nine Old Men.[22] The composition of members at Telecom Animation Film for animated feature films directed by Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata also served as a stepping stone for the transfer of Toei Animation's feature film production techniques to Studio Ghibli.[10]

History of TMS Entertainment[edit]

Kyokuichi Co., Ltd. opened its first amusement arcade in 1991, and joined the Sega Group in 1992 through a business alliance with Sega and Sega Toys.[24] In the same year, Tokyo Movie Shinsha became a subsidiary of Sega through a stock acquisition.

On November 1, 1995, Sega absorbed Tokyo Movie Shinsha into Kyokuichi, with Kyokuichi as the surviving company.[1][2] In conjunction with this merger, Kyokuichi made Telecom Animation Film and TMS Photo, which were subsidiaries of Tokyo Movie Shinsha, its own subsidiaries. Kyokuichi established a Tokyo branch office and launched its animation production division, Tokyo Movie Division. The name of the company was credited as Kyokuichi Tokyo Movie in the anime works produced at that time, however international prints used the TMS-Kyokuichi name.

In 1996 the Los Angeles studio was established.[1]

On January 1, 2000, Kyokuichi changed its name to TMS Entertainment Co., Ltd.[b][1][2] The name Tokyo Movie remained as the name of the animation production division and as the brand name for animation production.

In 2003, the company completely withdrew from the textile business.[citation needed] Since then, animation production and amusement arcade operations were the two mainstays of its business.

In 2003, American brokerage group Merrill Lynch became the second-largest shareholder in TMS Entertainment after acquiring a 7.54 percent stake in the studio. Merrill Lynch purchased the stake purely for investment purposes and had no intention of acquiring control of the firm's management.[25]

In 2005, Sega Sammy Holdings acquired a 50.2% stake in TMS Entertainment, making it a subsidiary.[26]

In 2006, the Tokyo branch was reorganized as the Tokyo headquarters and merged with the Head Office in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture. The headquarters then moved to Shinjuku, Tokyo.[1] The Los Angeles studio was reorganized as TMS ENTERTAINMENT, USA, INC.[1]

In February 2007, TMS Entertainment announced the completion of its fourth Tokyo studio (Building D) in Nakano, Tokyo. The company stated that Shinjuku would thereafter serve as the base for its corporate division and Nakano as the base for its production division.[27]

In 2008, the company withdrew from the amusement arcade business and concentrated its business on animation production.

In 2010, TMS Entertainment was delisted and became a wholly owned subsidiary of Sega Sammy Holdings through a share exchange.[28]

In 2011, the credits for Detective Conan and Anpanman were changed to TMS Entertainment, and animation production under the Tokyo Movie name ended.

In November 2012, TMS relocated its headquarters to Nakano, Tokyo.[1][2]

TMS Entertainment took a stake in Jinni's Animation Studio, a VFX and CG production company, in 2013 and made it a group company in 2015. With that, the company name was changed to TMS Jinni's.

In November 2013, a new studio was completed in Nakano, Tokyo.

In April 2015, the Sega Sammy Holdings was reorganized to form the new Sega Group. TMS Entertainment became a wholly owned subsidiary of the newly established Sega Holdings.[24][29]

Marza Animation Planet moved from being part of Sega Holdings to being part of TMS Entertainment in April 2017. TMS Entertainment transferred all of the digital content planning, development, and production business owned by its subsidiary TOCSIS to Marza Animation Planet in April 2019.[30]

In July 2021, TMS Entertainment announced the launch of the Unlimited Produce Project. The project is characterized by its focus on collaboration with outside studios to strengthen production operations such as planning, production, business, and promotion of works. The first project is Resident Evil: Infinite Darkness, which was distributed worldwide on Netflix from July 8, 2012, and was produced in collaboration with CG studio Quebico.[4]

In April 2023, Marza Animation Planet moved from under TMS Entertainment to under its parent company, Sega.[30]

In 2024, TMS Entertainment transferred the 3DCG video production business of its subsidiary TMS Jinni's to its subsidiary Toms Photo through a company split.

Subsidiaries[edit]

The company has numerous animation subsidiaries collaborating in conjunction with the company. Those include:

Productions[edit]

[51][52][53]

Television series[edit]

1960s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Big X TBS August 3, 1964September 27, 1965 59 Scifi, Action Adapted from Osamu Tezuka's original manga, which was serialized in Shueisha's Shonen Book from 1963 to 1966.
Obake no Q-tarō August 29, 1965June 28, 1967 96 Comedy Adapted from Fujiko Fujio's original manga, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1964 to 1966.
Perman April 2, 1967April 14, 1968 54 Adapted from Fujiko Fujio's original manga, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1967 to 1968.
Kyojin no Hoshi Yomiuri TV March 30, 1968September 18, 1971 182 Sports Adapted from the manga by Ikki Kajiwara and Noboru Kawasaki, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1966 to 1971.
Kaibutsu-kun TBS April 21, 1968March 23, 1969 49 Horror, Comedy, Fantasy, Adventure Adapted from Fujiko Fujio's original manga, which was serialized in Shonen Gahosha's Shonen Gaho from 1965 to 1969.
Umeboshi Denka April 1September 23, 1969 26 Comedy Original series
Roppō Yabure-kun Nagoya Broadcasting Network April 28September 26, 1969 110 Slice of Life Adapted from Saga Sen's story of the same name.
Moomin Fuji TV October 5, 1969December 27, 1970 65 Fantasy Adapted from Tove Jansson's book of the same name.
Attack No. 1 December 7, 1969November 28, 1971 104 Sports, Drama Adapted from Chikako Urano's original manga, which was serialized in Shueisha's Margaret manga magazine for female readers from 1968 to 1970.

1970s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Chingō Muchabe TBS February 15March 22, 1971 51 Adventure, Comedy
Shin Obake no Q-Tarō September 1, 1971December 27, 1972 70 Comedy, Slice of Life, Supernatural Adapted from Fujiko Fujio's original manga, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Shogakukan Learning Magazine from 1971 to 1973.
Tensai Bakabon
  • Nagoya Broadcasting Network
  • Nippon TV
September 25, 1971June 24, 1972 40 Comedy, Slice of Life Adaptation from Fujio Akatsuka's original manga, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine and Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday manga magazines for boys from 1967 to 1976.
Lupin The Third Part I[51] Nippon TV October 24, 1971March 26, 1972 23 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Mystery Adapted from Monkey Punch's original manga, which was serialized in Futabasha's Weekly Manga Action manga magazine for adult male readers from 1967 to 1969.
Akado Suzunosuke Fuji TV April 5, 1972March 28, 1973 52 Adventure Adapted from Tsunayoshi Takeuchi's original manga, which was serialized in Shonen Gahosha's Shonen Gaho from 1954 to 1965.
Dokonjō Gaeru ABC October 7, 1972September 28, 1974 103 Comedy, Slice of Life Adapted from Yasumi Yoshizawa's original manga, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump manga magazine from 1970 to 1976.
Jungle Kurobee Mainichi Broadcasting System March 2September 28, 1973 31 Comedy Adapted from Fujiko Fujio's original manga.
Kōya no Shōnen Isamu Fuji TV April 4, 1973March 27, 1974 52 Action, Adventure Adapted from the manga by Soji Yamakawa and Noboru Kawasaki, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump from 1971 to 1974.
Karate Baka Ichidai NET October 3, 1973September 25, 1974 47 Adventure, Sports Adapted from Ikki Kajiwara's original manga, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1971 to 1977.
Aim for the Ace! Mainichi Broadcasting System October 5, 1973March 29, 1974 26 Drama, Romance, Sports Adapted from Sumika Yamamoto's original manga in Shueisha's Margaret manga magazine for female readers from 1973 to 1980. Co-production with Madhouse.
Samurai Giants Yomiuri TV October 7, 1973September 15, 1974 46 Sports Adapted from the manga by Ikki Kajiwara and Kou Inoue in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump from 1971 to 1974. Co-production with Madhouse.
Judo Sanka Nippon TV April 1September 30, 1974 27 Adapted from the manga by Ikki Kajiwara and Hiroshi Kaizuka in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1972 to 1975.
First Human Giatrus ABC October 5, 1974March 27, 1976 77 Comedy Adapted from Shunji Sonoyama's manga which was serialized from 1965 to 1975 in Jitsugyo no Nihon Sha's Weekly Manga Sunday, in 1966 alone in Gakken's Gakushuu Magazine, and Shogakukan's Gakunen Magazine in 1974.
Gamba no Bouken[51] Nippon TV April 7September 29, 1975 26 Adventure, Suspense Co-production with Madhouse.
Ganso Tensai Bakabon October 6, 1975September 26, 1977 103 Comedy, Slice of Life Second adaptation of Tensai Bakabon.
Hana no Kakarichō TV Asahi October 3, 1976March 27, 1977 25
Shin Kyōjin no Hoshi
  • Yomiuri TV
  • Nippon TV
October 1, 1977September 30, 1978 52 Sports Adapted from the manga by Ikki Kajiwara and Noboru Kawasaki, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1976 to 1979.
Nobody's Boy: Remi Nippon TV October 2, 1977October 1, 1978 51 Adventure, Drama Adapted from the novel Sans Famille (1878) by Hector Malot
co-production with Madhouse.
Lupin III Part II[51] October 3, 1977October 6, 1980 155 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Mystery Second installment of Lupin III, and the most prolific in the franchise's history.
Treasure Island October 8, 1978April 1, 1979 26 Adventure, Drama, Mystery Adapted from the novel by Robert Louis Stevenson.

co-production with Madhouse.

New Aim For the Ace October 14, 1978March 31, 1979 25 Drama, Romance, Sports Continuation of Aim for the Ace!
Shin Kyōjin no Hoshi 2
  • Yomiuri TV
  • Nippon TV
April 14September 29, 1979 23 Sports Second adaptation of Shin Kyojin no Hoshi.
The Rose of Versailles Nippon TV October 10, 1979September 3, 1980 40 Drama, Romance Adapted from Riyoko Ikeda's original manga in Shueisha's Margaret from 1972 to 1973.

1980s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Mū no Hakugei Yomiuri TV April 4September 26, 1980 26 Action, Fantasy, Sci-Fi Original series
New Tetsujin-28[51] Nippon TV October 3, 1980September 25, 1981 51 Action Second adaptation of Mitsuteru Yokoyama's manga, which was serialized in Kobunsha's Shonen manga magazine from 1956 to 1966. Adapted into English as The New Adventures of Gigantor.
Ashita no Joe 2 October 13, 1980August 31, 1981 47 Drama, Sports Continuation of the second half of the events of Tetsuya Chiba's original manga, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1968 to 1973.
Ohayo! Spank TV Asahi March 7, 1981May 29, 1982 63 Comedy, Slice of Life Adapted from the original manga by Shun'ichi Yukimuro and Shizue Takanashi, which was serialized in Kodansha's Nakayoshi manga magazine for girls from 1979 to 1982.
Shin Dokonjō Gaeru NTV September 7, 1981March 29, 1982 30 Second adaptation of Dokonjō Gaeru.
Ulysses 31[52] France 3 (France) October 3, 1981November 30, 1982 26 Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi co-production with DIC Entertainment
Six God Combination Godmars Nippon TV October 2, 1981December 24, 1982 64 Action, Sci-Fi Adapted from Mitsuteru Yokoyama's manga titled Mars, which was serialized in Shonen Captain from 1976 to 1977.
Jarinko Chie MBS October 3, 1981March 25, 1983 65 Comedy, Drama Adapted from Etsumi Haruki's original manga, which was serialized in Manga Action from 1978 to 1997.
Tonde Mon pe ABC June 5, 1982April 2, 1983 42 Supernatural
Ninjaman Ippei Nippon TV October 4December 27, 1982 13 Action, Comedy, Slice of Life
Space Cobra[51] Fuji TV October 7, 1982May 19, 1983 31 Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi Adapted from the manga, Space Adventure Cobra, by Buichi Terasawa, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump from 1978 to 1984.
Lady Georgie TV Asahi April 9, 1983February 25, 1984 45 Drama, Romance
The Super Dimension Century Orguss[52] MBS July 3, 1983April 8, 1984 35 Action, Adventure, Romance, Sci-Fi Second installment of Big West's Super Dimension trilogy, the other two of which, Macross and The Southern Cross are produced by Studio Nue, in association with Tatsunoko Production.The only Super Dimension series which was not adapted into Robotech by Harmony Gold USA.
Cat's Eye[51] Nippon TV July 11, 1983July 8, 1985 73 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Mystery, Romance Adapted from Tsukasa Hojo's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shonen Jump from 1981 to 1985.
Lupin III Part III[51] Yomiuri TV March 3, 1984December 25, 1985 50 Action, Adventure, Comedy
God Mazinger Nippon TV April 5October 23, 1984 23 Action, Fantasy
Mighty Orbots ABC Television Network September 8December 15, 1984 13 Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi co-production with MGM Television and Intermedia Entertainment
Sherlock Hound November 6, 1984May 21, 1985 26 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Mystery Co-production with the Italian public broadcasting corporation Rai
Onegai! Samia Don NHK April 2, 1985February 4, 1986 39 Comedy, Fantasy, Slice of Life Adapted from the novel Five Children and It (1902) by E. Nesbit.
Robotan Yomiuri TV January 6September 20, 1986 33 Comedy Second adaptation of Morita Kenji's original manga.
Honey Bee in Toycomland (Bug-tte Honey) Nippon TV October 3, 1986September 25, 1987 51 Adventure, Comedy Based on the Adventure Island video game by Hudson Soft.
Anpanman[53] October 3, 1988 – present Comedy, Fantasy

1990s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Mischievous Twins: The Tales of St. Clare's Nippon TV January 5November 2, 1991 26 Comedy, Slice of Life Adapted from St. Clare's books by Enid Blyton.
Kinkyū Hasshin Saver Kids TV Tokyo February 19, 1991February 18, 1992 50 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi Original series
Reporter Blues NHK October 3November 8, 1991 52 Comedy, Mystery
Chie-chan Funsenki: Jarinko Chie MBS October 19, 1991September 22, 1992 39 Comedy, Drama An adaptation of the first series, with different characters and an alternate setting.
I and Myself: The Two Lottes Nippon TV November 9, 1991September 5, 1992 29 Slice of Life Adapted from the novel, Lottie and Lisa by Erich Kästner
Tetsujin 28 FX[51] April 5, 1992March 30, 1993 47 Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi Second adaptation of Tetsujin 28-gou.
Boku no Patrasche October 10, 1992March 27, 1993 26 Drama Adapted from the novel A Dog of Flanders (1872) by Ouida.
Soccer Fever NHK April 4, 1994March 27, 1995 51 Sports Original series
Red Baron[52] Nippon TV April 5, 1994March 28, 1995 49 Sci-Fi, Sports A remake of the 1973 live-action series Super Robot Red Baron.
Magic Knight Rayearth[51] Yomiuri TV October 17, 1994March 13, 1995 20 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Drama, Fantasy Adapted from the manga by Clamp, which was serialized in Kodansha's Nakayoshi manga magazine for female readers from 1993 to 1996.
Magic Knight Rayearth II April 10November 27, 1995 29 Action, Adventure, Drama, Fantasy, Romance Second season of Magic Knight Rayearth.
Virtua Fighter[51] (anime television series) TV Tokyo October 9, 1995June 27, 1996 35 Action Adapted from Sega's fighting video game series of the same name.
Kaitō Saint Tail TV Asahi October 12, 1995September 12, 1996 43 Adventure, Romance Adapted from Megumi Tachikawa's original manga, which was serialized in Nakayoshi from 1994 to 1996.
Case Closed/Detective Conan[51]
  • Nippon TV
  • Yomiuri TV
January 8, 1996 – present Adventure, Comedy, Mystery Adapted from the manga by Gosho Aoyama since 1994, has been serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday.
B't X[51] TBS April 6September 21, 1996 25 Adventure, Sci-Fi Adapted from Masami Kurumada's original manga, which was serialized in Kadokawa's Shōnen Ace from 1994 to 2000.
Wankorobe TV Tokyo October 6, 1996March 30, 1997 26 Comedy, Fantasy Adapted from manga of the same name by Yuriko Abe, which was serialized in Nakayoshi from 1975.

Co-produced with Ajiado.

Devil Lady[51] MBS October 10, 1998May 8, 1999 26 Action, Drama, Horror, Suspense Adapted from Go Nagai's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Kondansha's Weekly morning from 1997 to 2000.
Monster Farm: Enbanseki no Himitsu TBS April 17, 1999March 25, 2000 48 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Fantasy Adapted from Tecmo's Monster Rancher video game franchise.
Cybersix TV Tokyo September 6November 29, 1999 13 Action, Adventure, Romance, Sci-Fi Adapted from Carlos Meglia's comic strip of the same name.
Gozonji! Gekko Kamen-kun October 3, 1999March 26, 2000 25 Comedy, Sci-Fi
Karakurizōshi Ayatsuri Sakon October 8, 1999March 31, 2000 26 Mystery, Suspense Adapted from manga of the same name by Takeshi Obata and Masaru Miyazaki, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1995 to 1996.
Shūkan Storyland Nippon TV October 14, 1999September 13, 2001 56 Comedy, Drama, Slice of Life Original series

2000s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Monster Farm: Densetsu e no Michi TBS April 1September 30, 2000 25 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Fantasy Adapted from Tecmo's Monster Rancher video game franchise.
Tottoko Hamtaro TV Tokyo July 7, 2000March 31, 2006 296 Adventure, Comedy Adapted from Ritsuko Kawai's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Ciao from 1997 to 2000.
Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Children October 7, 2000September 29, 2001 50 Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Supernatural Adapted from Atlus's Megami Tensei franchise
Project ARMS TV Tokyo April 7September 29, 2001 26 Action Adapted from the manga of the same name by Kyoichi Nanatsuki and Ryōji Minagawa, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1997 to 2002.
Project ARMS: The 2nd Chapter October 6, 2001March 30, 2002 Action, Fantasy The second chapter of Project ARMS.
Secret of Cerulean Sand WOWOW January 5June 29, 2002 Adventure, Sci-Fi Co-production with Telecom Animation Film
Cheeky Angel TV Tokyo April 7, 2002March 30, 2003 50 Comedy, Romance Adapted from Hiroyuki Nishimori's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1999 to 2003.
The Star of the Giants October 23, 2002January 15, 2003 13 Drama, Sports Adapted from the manga by Ikki Kajiwara and Noboru Kawasaki, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shonen Magazine from 1966 to 1971.
Sonic X TV Tokyo April 6, 2003March 28, 2004 78 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi Adapted from Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog video game franchise, particularly, the events of Sonic Adventure 1 and 2, with additional characters not seen in the games.
Umeyon Ekisu May 2July 27, 2003 13 Comedy Original series
Rumic Theater TV Tokyo July 6September 28, 2003 Comedy, Drama, Romance, Slice of Life, Supernatural Adapted from Rumiko Takahashi's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Big Comic Original from 1987.
Kousetsu Hyaku Monogatari CBC October 4December 27, 2003 Horror, Mystery, Supernatural Adapted from Natsuhiko Kyogoku's short stories titled The Wicked and the Damned: A Hundred Tales of Karma.
Mermaid Forest TV Tokyo October 5December 21, 2003 11 Drama, Fantasy, Horror, Mystery Adapted from Rumiko Takahashi's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Shōnen Sunday Zōkan and Weekly Shōnen Sunday from 1984 to 1994.
PoPoLoCrois (2nd Series) October 5, 2003March 28, 2004 26 Adventure, Fantasy Adapted from Yohsuke Tamori's manga of the same name, which was serialized in The Asahi Shimbun Company's The Asahi Shimbun Student Newspaper from 1984.
Uninhabited Planet Survive! NHK October 16, 2003October 28, 2004 52 Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Slice of Life Original series. Made by TMS's subsidiary, Telecom Animation Film, and co-produced with Madhouse.
Aishiteruze Baby Animax April 3October 9, 2004 26 Comedy, Drama, Romance Adapted from Yōko Maki's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Ribon from 2002 to 2005.
Monkey Punch Manga Katsudō Daishashin WOWOW August 1, 2004June 25, 2005 12 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Ecchi Adapted from various short stories that created by Monkey Punch.
Gallery Fake TV Tokyo January 9September 25, 2005 37 Mystery Adapted from Fujihiko Hosono's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakuan's Weekly Big Comic Spirits (1992–2005, 2012, 2016) and Big Comic Zokan (2017–present)
Buzzer Beater WOWOW February 5April 30, 2005 13 Sci-Fi, Sports Adapted from Takehiko Inoue's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Monthly Shōnen Jump from 1996 to 1998.
Mushiking: King of the Beetles TV Tokyo April 6, 2005March 29, 2006 52 Fantasy Adapted from Sega's card game of the same name.
Glass Mask 51 Drama, Romance Adapted from Suzue Miuchi's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Hakusensha's Hana to Yume from 1976.
The Snow Queen NHK May 22, 2005February 12, 2006 36 Adventure, Drama, Fantasy Adapted from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale of the same name.
Angel Heart[51] Nippon TV October 4, 2005September 26, 2006 50 Action, Drama, Mystery, Romance Adapted from Tsukasa Hojo's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shinchosha's Weekly Comic Bunch from 2001 to 2010.
Fighting Beauty Wulong[51] TV Tokyo October 10, 2005March 26, 2006 25 Action, Ecchi Adapted from Yūgo Ishikawa's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Young Sunday from 2002 to 2007.
Kakutou Bijin Wulong: Rebirth April 2October 1, 2006 Action, Comedy Second season of Fighting Beauty Wulong.
D.Gray-man
  • Animax
  • TV Tokyo
October 3, 2006September 30, 2008 103 Action, Adventure, Fantasy Adapted from Katsura Hoshino's manga of the same name, which has been serialized across Shueisha's Jump line of manga magazines for young boys, beginning with Weekly Shonen Jump from 2004 to 2009, and Jump SQ as of 2019.
Pururun! Shizuku-Chan TV Tokyo October 7, 2006September 29, 2007 51 Comedy Adapted from Q-LiA's children's book series.
Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple October 8, 2006September 30, 2007 50 Action, Comedy Adapted from Syun Matsuena's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday manga magazine from 2002 to 2014.
Bakugan Battle Brawlers April 5, 2007March 27, 2008 52 Action, Fantasy Original series. Co-production with Nelvana, Spin Master Entertainment and Sega Toys.
Kaze no Shōjo Emily NHK April 7September 29, 2007 26 Drama Adapted from Lucy Maud Montgomery's novel of the same name.
Buzzer Beater (Season 2)
  • Nippon TV
  • Yomiuri TV
July 4September 26, 2007 13 Sci-Fi, Sports Second season of Buzzer Beater.
Mameushi-kun Cartoon Network Japan October 6, 2007September 27, 2008 52 Comedy, Fantasy
Pururun! Shizuku-chan Aha AT-X October 7, 2007September 28, 2008 51 Comedy Second season of Pururun! Shizuku-Chan
Noramimi Tokyo MX January 9March 26, 2008 12 Adapted from Kazuo Hara's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Monthly Ikki from 2002 to 2009.
Itazura na Kiss[53] TBS April 5September 25, 2008 25 Comedy, Romance Adapted from Kaoru Tada's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Bessatsu Margaret from 1990 to 1999.
Telepathy Shōjo Ran NHK June 21December 20, 2008 26 Fantasy Adapted from Atsuko Asano's novel of the same name.
Scarecrowman Animax July 3December 25, 2008 Original series
Live On Cardliver Kakeru TV Tokyo October 5, 2008September 27, 2009 51
Mamegoma Chiba TV January 10December 26, 2009 Based on San-X's series of seal characters.
Examurai Sengoku January 11June 25, 2009 24 Action, Sci-Fi
Genji Monogatari Sennenki Fuji TV January 16March 27, 2009 11 Drama, Romance Adapted from Waki Yamato's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Kondansha's Mimi from 1979 to 1993. Co-production with Tezuka Productions.
Rose O'Neill Kewpie WOWOW December 2, 2009May 26, 2010 26 Comedy

2010s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Bakugan Battle Brawlers: New Vestroia TV Tokyo March 2, 2010March 5, 2011 52 Adventure, Fantasy Sequel of Bakugan Battle Brawlers.
Lilpri
  • TV Asahi
  • AT-X
  • TV Tokyo
April 4, 2010March 27, 2011 51 Fantasy Adapted from the Sega's arcade game of the same name.
Cardfight!! Vanguard January 8, 2011March 31, 2012 65 Action Original series. Spawn the Cardfight!! Vanguard franchise in the later future.
Bakugan Battle Brawlers: Gundalian Invaders TV Tokyo April 3, 2011January 22, 2012 39 Action, Adventure, Fantasy Sequel of Bakugan Battle Brawlers: New Vestoria.
Battle Girls: Time Paradox
  • AT-X
  • TV Tokyo
April 5June 28, 2011 13 Action, Comedy, Sci-Fi Adapted from the Heiwa's pachinko game series.
Brave 10 Animax January 8March 25, 2012 12 Action, Adventure Adapted from Kairi Shimotsuki's manga of the same name.
Zetman Tokyo MX April 3June 26, 2012 13 Action, Drama, Horror, Romance, Sci-Fi, Supernatural Adapted from Masakazu Katsura's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Young Jump from 2002 to 2014.
Lupin the Third: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine[51] Nippon TV April 5June 28, 2012 Action, Adventure, Award Winning, Comedy, Ecchi Adapted from Monkey Punch's original manga, which was serialized in Futabasha's Weekly Manga Action manga magazine for adult male readers from 1967 to 1969. Co-production with Po10tial.
Cardfight!! Vanguard: Asia Circuit-hen TV Tokyo April 8, 2012January 2, 2013 39 Action Sequel of Cardfight!! Vanguard.
Kamisama Kiss October 2December 25, 2012 13 Comedy, Fantasy, Romance Adapted from Julietta Suzuki's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Hakusensha's Hana to Yume from 2008 to 2016.
Bakumatsu Gijinden Roman
  • AT-X
  • TV Tokyo
January 8March 26, 2013 12 Fantasy Adapted from CR Ginroku Gijinden Roman pachinko game.
Cardfight!! Vanguard: Link Joker-hen TV Tokyo January 13, 2013March 2, 2014 59 Action Sequel of Cardfight!! Vanguard: Asia Circuit.
Anisava August 26, 2013January 13, 2014 13 Comedy, Romance Co-production with DLE
Yowamushi Pedal
  • AT-X
  • TV Tokyo
October 8, 2013July 1, 2014 38 Sports Adapted from Wataru Watanabe's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Akita Shoten's Weekly Shōnen Champion from 2008.
The Pilot's Love Song
  • AT-X
  • Tokyo MX
January 6March 31, 2014 13 Adventure, Drama, Romance Adapted from Koroku Inumura's light novel of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Gagaga Bunko from 2009 to 2011.
Cardfight!! Vanguard Legion Mate TV Tokyo March 9October 19, 2014 33 Action Sequel of Cardfight!! Vanguard: Link Joker.
Hero Bank April 7, 2014March 30, 2015 51 Tournament Adapted from game of the same name by Sega.
Gugure! Kokkuri-san
  • AT-X
  • TV Tokyo
October 6December 22, 2014 12 Comedy, Supernatural Adapted from Midori Endō's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Square Enix's Gangan Joker from 2011 to 2016.
Yowamushi Pedal: Grande Road TV Tokyo October 7, 2014March 31, 2015 24 Sports Second season of Yowamushi Pedal.
Sega Hard Girls October 8December 24, 2014 13 Comedy Adapted from a collaboration between ASCII Media Works' Dengeki Bunko imprint and Sega.
Cardfight!! Vanguard G
  • BS Japan
  • TV Tokyo
October 26, 2014October 4, 2015 48 Action Sequel of Cardfight!! Vanguard: Legion Mate.
Kamisama Kiss◎ Animax January 6March 31, 2015 12 Comedy, Fantasy, Romance Second season of Kamisama Kiss.
My Monster Secret
  • TV Tokyo
  • TVO
  • TVQ
  • TVh
  • TVA
  • TSC
  • AT-X
July 7September 29, 2015 13 Adapted from Eiji Masuda's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Akita Shoten's Weekly Shōnen Champion from 2013 to 2017.
Lupin the Third Part 4 Nippon TV October 2, 2015March 18, 2016 24 Action, Adventure, Comedy, Mystery Fifth installment of the Lupin III series created by Monkey Punch.
Cardfight!! Vanguard G: GIRS Crisis-hen October 11, 2015April 10, 2016 26 Action The first half of the second season of Cardfight!! Vanguard G series.
Bakuon!! April 5June 21, 2016 12 Comedy Adapted from Mimana Orimoto's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Akita Shoten's Young Champion Retsu from 2011.
Cardfight!! Vanguard G: Stride Gate-hen TV Tokyo April 17September 25, 2016 24 Action The second half of the second season of Cardfight!! Vanguard G series.
Kamiwaza Wanda TBS April 23, 2016March 25, 2017 47 Sci-Fi Adapted from Maeda-kun's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shogakukan's CoroCoro Ichiban from 2016.
ReLIFE[53] July 2September 24, 2016 13 Drama, Romance Adapted from Sō Yayoi's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Earth Star Entertainment's Comico Japan from 2013 to 2018.
Orange
  • Tokyo MX
  • AT-X
  • BS11
  • TVA
  • ABC
  • TSB
July 4September 26, 2016 Drama, Romance, Sci-Fi Adapted from Ichigo Takano's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Monthly Action from 2012 to 2022.
Bananya Sun TV Slice of Life Original series
Sweetness and Lightning
  • Tokyo MX
  • Yoimuri TV
  • BS11
July 5September 20, 2016 12 Gourmet, Slice of Life Adapted from Gido Amagakure's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Kondansha's Good! Afternoon from 2013 to 2018.
D.Gray-man Hallow TV Tokyo July 5September 27, 2016 13 Action, Adventure, Fantasy Sequel to D.Gray-man anime series
Pittanko! Nekozakana October 2, 2016September 17, 2017 50 Comedy Original series
Ohayou! Kokekkou-san October 2September 17, 2016
Kimoshiba October 2December 25, 2016 13 Comedy, Horror, Supernatural
Trickster October 4, 2016March 28, 2017 24 Drama, Mystery, Sci-Fi Original series. Co-production with Shin-Ei Animation.
Nobunaga no Shinobi 26 Comedy Adapted from Naoki Shigeno's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Hakusensha's Young Animal from 2008.
All Out!! October 7, 2016March 31, 2017 25 Sports Co-production with Madhouse.
Clean Freak! Aoyama-kun
Yowamushi Pedal: New Generation
Nana Maru San Batsu
Yowamushi Pedal: Glory Line
Megalobox
The Thousand Musketeers
Space Bug/The Journey Home
Between the Sky and Sea
Bakugan: Battle Planet
Meiji Tokyo Renka
Fruits Basket
Hachigatsu no Cinderella Nine
Dr. Stone
  • Tokyo MX
  • KBS
  • SUN
  • BS11
  • TVh
  • TBC
  • TVA
  • TVQ
July 5December 13, 2019 24 Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi

2020s[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Episodes Genre Note(s)
Bakugan: Armored Alliance Amazon Prime Video April 3, 2020March 26, 2021 52 Action, Fantasy Second season of Bakugan: Battle Planet.
Fruits Basket 2nd Season April 7September 22, 2020 25 Drama, Romance, Supernatural Second season of Fruits Basket (2019).
Rent-A-Girlfriend
  • MBS
  • TBS
July 11September 26, 2020 12 Comedy, Romance Adapted from Reiji Miyajima's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Kondansha's Weekly Shōnen Magazine from 2017.
Dr. Stone: Stone Wars
  • Tokyo MX
  • KBS
  • SUN
  • BS11
  • TVh
  • TBC
  • TVA
  • TVQ
January 14March 25, 2021 11 Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi Adapted from chapters 60-84 of the Dr. Stone manga.
Burning Kabaddi
Megalobox 2: Nomad
Seirei Gensouki: Spirit Chronicles
Lupin the 3rd Part 6
Detective Conan: Police Academy Arc
Insect Land
Detective Conan: Zero's Tea Time
Detective Conan: The Culprit Hanzawa
Yowamushi Pedal: Limit Break
Dr. Stone: New World
  • Tokyo MX
  • KBS
  • SUN
  • BS11
  • TVh
  • TBC
  • TVA
  • TVQ
April 6June 15, 2023 11 Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi Adapted from chapters 90-115 of the Dr. Stone manga.
I Got a Cheat Skill in Another World and Became Unrivaled in The Real World, Too April 7June 30, 2023 13 Action, Adventure, Fantasy Animated by Millepensee. Adapted from Miku's light novel of the same name, which was serialized in Fujimi Shobo's Fujimi Fantasia Bunko from 2018.
Kanojo, Okarishimasu 3rd Season Crunchyroll July 8September 30, 2023 12 Comedy, Romance The anime adapted chapters 104 through 167 of the Rental-a-Girlfriend manga.
Undead Unluck
  • MBS
  • TBS
October 7, 2023March 23, 2024 24 Action, Comedy, Fantasy Animated by David Production. Adapted from Yoshifumi Tozuka's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump from 2020.
The Seven Deadly Sins: Four Knights of the Apocalypse TBS October 8, 2023March 31, 2024 24 Action, Adventure, Fantasy The sequel of The Seven Deadly Sins by Nakaba Suzuki which was serialized in Kondansha's Weekly Shōnen Magazine from 2021.
Dr. Stone: New World Part 2
  • Tokyo MX
  • KBS
  • SUN
  • BS11
  • TVA
October 12December 21, 2023 11 Adventure, Comedy, Sci-Fi Adapted from chapters 116-142 of the Dr. Stone manga.
High Card Season 2 Crunchyroll January 8March 25, 2024 12 Action, Fantasy Second season of High Card.
Rinkai! April 9, 2024 – present 12 Sports
Sakamoto Days January 2025 – scheduled Action, Comedy Adapted from Yuto Suzuki's manga of the same name, which was serialized in Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump from 2020.

Feature films[edit]

Title Director(s) Distributor Year(s) Note(s)
Kyojin no Hoshi: Chizome no Kesshōsen July 26, 1969
Kyojin no Hoshi: Ike Ike Hyūma December 20, 1969
Star of the Giants: Big League Ball Tadao Nagahama Toho March 21, 1970 Third feature film compilation of two episodes from Star of the Giants, respectively episode 70 "Hidari Mon no Yokoku Houmuran", and episode 77 "Hanagata Sutemi no Chousen".
Attack No. 1: The Movie Eiji Okabe March 21, 1970
Attack No. 1: Revolution August 1, 1970
Star of the Giants: The Fateful Showdown Tadao Nagahama August 1, 1970 Fourth feature film compilation of two episodes from Star of the Giants, respectively episode 79 "Ourusutaa no Deki Goto", and episode 83 "Kizu Darake no Houmuin".
Attack No. 1: World Championship Eiji Okabe December 19, 1970
Attack No. 1: Immortal Bird March 17, 1971
Panda! Go, Panda! Isao Takahata December 17, 1972 featurette
Panda! Go, Panda!: The Rainy Day Circus Isao Takahata March 17, 1973 featurette
Lupin III Sōji Yoshikawa December 16, 1978 First animated feature film in Monkey Punch's Lupin III franchise; later subtitled Lupin vs. the Clone in Japanese and The Mystery of Mamo in English.
Aim for the Ace! Osamu Dezaki September 8, 1979 Feature film adaptation of Aim for the Ace!; acts as a complete alternate retelling of the events already established in the manga and anime.
Ganbare!! Tabuchi-kun!! Tsutomu Shibayama Toho-Towa November 10, 1979 Adapted from the manga of the same series by Hisaichi Ishii, which was featured Futabasha's Weekly Manga Action magazine from 1978 to 1979; followed by two more films based on the same manga.
Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro Hayao Miyazaki Toho December 15, 1979 Second animated feature film in Monkey Punch's Lupin III franchise, as well as Hayao Miyazaki's theatrical directorial debut.
Nobody's Boy: Remi Osamu Dezaki, Yoshio Takeuchi Toho March 15, 1980 Feature film compilation of the events of Nobody's Boy: Remi.
Ganbare!! Tabuchi-kun!! 2: Gekitō Pennant Race Tsutomu Shibayama Toho-Towa May 3, 1980 Second film based on the manga Ganbare!! Tabuchi-kun!!, by Hisaichi Ishii.
Makoto-chan Tsutomu Shibayama Toho July 26, 1980 Adapted from the manga of the same name by Kazuo Umezu, which was serialized in Shogakukan's Weekly Shonen Sunday from 1976 to 1981.
Ganbare!! Tabuchi-kun!! Hatsu Warai 3: Aa Tsuppari Jinsei Tsutomu Shibayama Toho-Towa December 13, 1980 Third film based on the manga Ganbare!! Tabuchi-kun!!, by Hisaichi Ishii.
Chie the Brat Isao Takahata Toho April 11, 1981 Adapted from the manga of the same name by Etsumi Haruki, which was serialized in Futabasha's Weekly Manga Action from 1978 to 1997.
Ashita no Joe 2 Osamu Dezaki Toho July 4, 1981 Feature film compilation of the events of Ashita no Joe 2.
Manga Hana no Kakarichō Noboru Ishiguro, Minoru Okazaki Shochiku November 28, 1981
Manzai Taikouki Ryuji Sawada, Hideo Takayashiki Shochiku November 28, 1981
Ohayō! Spank Shigetsugu Yoshida Toho-Towa March 13, 1982 Feature film adaptation of Ohayō! Spank.
Space Adventure Cobra: The Movie Osamu Dezaki Toho-Towa July 3, 1982 One-time feature film adaptation of Space Adventure Cobra; covers the events of the manga's first major story arc.
Star of the Giants Satoshi Dezaki, Tadao Nagahama August 21, 1982 Feature film adaptation of Star of the Giants; acts as a complete alternate retelling of the events already established in the manga and anime.
God Mars: The Movie Tetsuo Imazawa December 18, 1982 Feature film compilation of the events of Six God Combination Godmars.
Pro Yakyū o 10-bai Tanoshiku Miru Hōhō Kiyoshi Suzuki, Tsutomu Shibayama, Osamu Kobayashi Toho-Towa April 29, 1983 Adapted from the book of the same name by Takenori Emoto, which was originally published by KK Bestsellers from 1982.
Golgo 13: The Professional Osamu Dezaki Toho-Towa May 28, 1983 Adapted from the manga of the same name by Takao Saito, which, since 1968, has been serialized in Shogakukan's Big Comic manga magazine for adult male readers.
Boukenshatachi: Gamba to 7-biki no Naka Ma Shinzo Azaki March 4, 1984 Feature film compilation of the events of Gamba no Bouken.
Meitantei Holmes: Aoi Ruby no Maki / Kaitei no Zaihō no Maki Hayao Miyazaki Toei Company March 11, 1984 First feature film compilation of two episodes from Sherlock Hound, respectively episode 5 "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle", and episode 9 "Treasure Under the Sea". Released in Japanese cinemas alongside Topcraft's Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, a film also directed by Miyazaki.[citation needed]
Lupin III: Legend of the Gold of Babylon Seijun Suzuki, Shigetsugu Yoshida Toho July 13, 1985 Third animated feature film in Monkey Punch's Lupin III franchise.
Meitantei Holmes: Mrs. Hudson Hitojichi Jiken / Dover Kaikyō no Daikūchūsen! Hayao Miyazaki Toei Company August 2, 1986 Second feature film compilation of two episodes from Sherlock Hound, respectively episode 4 "Mrs. Hudson is Taken Hostage", and episode 10 "The White Cliffs of Dover". Released in Japanese cinemas alongside Studio Ghibli's Castle in the Sky, a film also directed by Miyazaki.[citation needed]
Treasure Island Yoshio Takeuchi, Osamu Dezaki May 9, 1987 Feature film compilation of the events of Treasure Island.
Akira Katsuhiro Otomo Toho July 16, 1988 Adapted from the manga of the same name by Katsuhiro Otomo, who also serves as the film's director, which was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Young Magazine from 1982 to 1990.
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Shining Star's Tear Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. March 11, 1989 First animated feature film in the Anpanman franchise.
Onegai! Samia-don Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. March 11, 1989 Feature film adaptation of Onegai! Samia-don.
Robotan Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. March 11, 1989 Feature film adaptation of Robotan.
Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland Masami Hata, William Hurtz Toho-Towa (Japan), Hemdale Film Corporation (US, Canada) July 15, 1989 (Japan), August 21, 1992 (US, Canada) Japanese-American co-production. Adapted from the comic strip, Little Nemo in Slumberland by Windsor McCay which was serialized in The New York Herald from 1905 to 1913.
Ojisan Kaizō Kōza Tsutomu Shibayama Nippon Herald Films February 24, 1990
Let's Go! Anpanman: Baikinman's Counterattack Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 14, 1990
The Adventures of Gamba and Otters Shunji Ōga Kyodo Film July 20, 1991 First feature film adaptation of Gamba no Bouken.
Let's Go! Anpanman: Fly! Fly! Chibigon Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 20, 1991
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Secret of Building Block Castle Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. March 14, 1992
Let's Go! Anpanman: Nosshi the Dinosaur's Big Adventure Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 17, 1993
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Lyrical Magical Witch's School Akinori Nagaoka, Hiroyuki Yano Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 16, 1994
Lupin III: Farewell to Nostradamus Shunya Itō, Takeshi Shirato Toho April 22, 1995 Fourth animated feature film in Monkey Punch's Lupin III franchise.
Let's Go! Anpanman: Let's Defeat the Haunted Ship!! Hiroyuki Yano Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 29, 1995
Lupin III: Dead or Alive Monkey Punch Toho April 20, 1996 Fifth animated feature film in Monkey Punch's Lupin III franchise.
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Flying Picture Book and the Glass Shoes Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 13, 1996
Case Closed: The Time Bombed Skyscraper Kenji Kodama Toho April 19, 1997 First animated feature film in the Detective Conan/Case Closed franchise.
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Pyramid of the Rainbow Shunji Ōga Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 28, 1997
Case Closed: The Fourteenth Target Kenji Kodama Toho April 18, 1998
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Palm of the Hand to the Sun Akinori Nagaoka Shochiku-Fuji Ltd. July 25, 1998
Case Closed: The Last Wizard of the Century Kenji Kodama Toho April 17, 1999
Let's Go! Anpanman: When the Flower of Courage Opens Toshiya Shinohara July 24, 1999
Case Closed: Captured in Her Eyes Kenji Kodama Toho April 21, 2000
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Tears of the Mermaid Princess Akinori Nagaoka Media Box
Tokyo Theatres
July 29, 2000
Case Closed: Countdown to Heaven Kenji Kodama Toho April 21, 2001
Let's Go! Anpanman: Gomira's Star July 14, 2001
Hamtaro: Adventures in Ham-Ham Land Osamu Dezaki Toho December 15, 2001
Case Closed: The Phantom of Baker Street Kenji Kodama Toho April 20, 2002
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Secret of Roll and Roura's Floating Castle July 13, 2002
Hamtaro: The Captive Princess Osamu Dezaki Toho December 14, 2002
Detective Conan: Crossroad in the Ancient Capital Kenji Kodama Toho April 19, 2003
Let's Go! Anpanman: Ruby's Wish July 12, 2003
Hamtaro: Miracle in Aurora Valley Osamu Dezaki Toho December 13, 2003
Detective Conan: Magician of the Silver Sky Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 17, 2004
Let's Go! Anpanman: Nyanii of the Country of Dream Cats July 17, 2004
Hamtaro and the Demon of the Picture Book Tower Osamu Dezaki Toho December 23, 2004
Detective Conan: Strategy Above the Depths Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 9, 2005
Let's Go! Anpanman: Happy's Big Adventure July 16, 2005
Mushiking: The Road to the Greatest Champion Shunji Ōga December 17, 2005
Detective Conan: The Private Eyes' Requiem Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 15, 2006
Let's Go! Anpanman: Dolly of the Star of Life July 15, 2006
Mushiking Super Battle Movie: The Upgraded Armored Beetle of Darkness Junpei Mizusaki Shochiku March 21, 2007
Detective Conan: Jolly Roger in the Deep Azure Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 21, 2007
Let's Go! Anpanman: Purun of the Bubble Ball Hiroyuki Yano Media Box
Tokyo Theatres
July 14, 2007
Detective Conan: Full Score of Fear Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 19, 2008
Let's Go! Anpanman: Rinrin the Fairy's Secret Akinori Nagaoka Media Box
Tokyo Theatres
July 12, 2008
Detective Conan: The Raven Chaser Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 18, 2009
Let's Go! Anpanman: Dadandan and the Twin Stars Jun Kawagoe July 4, 2009
Detective Conan: The Lost Ship in the Sky Yasuichiro Yamamoto Toho April 17, 2010
Let's Go! Anpanman: Blacknose and the Magical Song Hiroyuki Yano Media Box
Tokyo Theatres
July 10, 2010
Detective Conan: Quarter of Silence Yasuichiro Yamamoto, Kobun Shizuno Toho April 16, 2011
Let's Go! Anpanman: Rescue! Kokorin and the Star of Miracles Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres July 2, 2011
The Princess and the Pilot Jun Shishido Tokyo Theatres October 1, 2011 co-production with Madhouse
Detective Conan: The Eleventh Striker Kobun Shizuno Toho April 14, 2012
Let's Go! Anpanman: Revive Banana Island Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres July 7, 2012
Detective Conan: Private Eye in the Distant Sea Kobun Shizuno Toho April 20, 2013
Let's Go! Anpanman: Fly! The Handkerchief of Hope Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres July 6, 2013
Lupin III vs. Detective Conan: The Movie Hajime Kamegaki Toho December 7, 2013
Dimensional Sniper Kobun Shizuno Toho April 19, 2014
Lupin III: Daisuke Jigen's Gravestone Takeshi Koike June 21, 2014
Let's Go! Anpanman: Apple Boy and the Wishes For Everyone Jun Kawagoe Tokyo Theatres July 5, 2014
Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno Kobun Shizuno Toho April 18, 2015
Let's Go! Anpanman: Mija and the Magic Lamp Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres July 4, 2015
Case Closed: The Darkest Nightmare Kobun Shizuno Toho April 16, 2016
Let's Go! Anpanman: Nanda and Runda of the Toy Star Jun Kawagoe Tokyo Theatres July 2, 2016
Orange: Future Naomi Nakayama, Hiroshi Hamasaki November 18, 2016 co-production with Telecom Animation Film
Lupin III: Goemon Ishikawa's Spray of Blood Takeshi Koike February 4, 2017
Case Closed: The Crimson Love Letter Kobun Shizuno Toho April 15, 2017
Let's Go! Anpanman: Bulbul's Big Treasure Hunt Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres July 1, 2017
Case Closed: Zero the Enforcer Yuzuru Tachikawa Toho April 13, 2018
Let's Go! Anpanman: Shine! Kurun and the Star of Life Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres June 30, 2018
Detective Conan: The Fist of Blue Sapphire Chika Nagaoka Toho April 12, 2019
Lupin III: Fujiko Mine's Lie Takeshi Koike May 31, 2019
Let's Go! Anpanman: Sparkle! Princess Vanilla of the Land of Ice Cream Hiroyuki Yano Tokyo Theatres June 28, 2019
Detective Conan: The Scarlet Bullet Chika Nagaoka Toho April 16, 2021
Let's Go! Anpanman: Fluffy Fuwari and the Cloud Country Jun Kawagoe Tokyo Theatres June 25, 2021
Detective Conan: The Bride of Halloween Susumu Mitsunaka Toho April 15, 2022
To Me, the One Who Loved You Ken'ichi Kasai Toei Company October 7, 2022
Resident Evil: Death Island Eiichirō Hasumi Kadokawa Corporation July 7, 2023 co-production with Quebico
Daisuke Jigen Hajime Hashimoto Prime Video October 13, 2023 co-production with Amazon MGM Studios

Television films and specials[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
Astro Boy vs. the Giants Nippon TV June 9, 1969
Bōchan Fuji TV June 13, 1980
Nijū-yon no Hitomi October 10, 1980
Sugata Sanshirō June 8, 1981
Son Goku: Silk Road o Tobu!! June 17, 1982
Let's Go! Anpanman: Santa Claus Disappears Nippon TV December 19, 1988
Lupin III: Bye Bye, Lady Liberty April 1, 1989
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and the Christmas Valley December 25, 1989
Lupin III: The Hemingway Papers July 20, 1990
Let's Go! Anpanman: Scoop the South Sea! August 26, 1990
Let's Go! Anpanman: Shine! Our Christmas Tree December 24, 1990
Lupin III: Napoleon's Dictionary August 9, 1991
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Mysterious Jingle December 23, 1991
Lupin III: From Russia with Love July 24, 1992
Let's Go! Anpanman: Delivered! Our Christmas December 21, 1992
Lupin III: Voyage to Danger July 23, 1993
Let's Go! Anpanman: The South Island's White Christmas December 20, 1993
Lupin III: Dragon of Doom July 29, 1994
Let's Go! Anpanman: The 2 Panna's Christmas December 19, 1994
Lupin III: The Pursuit of Harimao's Treasure August 4, 1995
Magic Knight Rayearth: Zokan go December 16, 1995
Let's Go! Anpanman: White Keito's Christmas December 25, 1995
Lupin III: The Secret of Twilight Gemini August 2, 1996
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and the Black Christmas December 13, 1996
Lupin III: Island of Assassins August 1, 1997
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Meringue Sisters' Christmas December 25, 1997
Lupin III: Tokyo Crisis July 24, 1998
Let's Go! Anpanman: Our Christmas Concert December 24, 1998
Lupin III: Da Capo of Love: Fujiko's Unlucky Days July 30, 1999
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and Your Merry Christmas December 23, 1999
Let's Go! Anpanman: Uncle Jam Has Disappeared February 21, 2000
Lupin III: Missed by a Dollar July 28, 2000
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman's Christmas Show December 21, 2000
Lupin III: Alcatraz Connection August 3, 2001
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and Small Santa's Christmas December 20, 2001
Lupin III: Episode 0: The First Contact July 26, 2002
Let's Go! Anpanman: The Flame of Courage and Christmas December 19, 2002
Lupin III: Operation Return the Treasure August 1, 2003
Let's Go! Anpanman: Black Santa and the Nice Present December 25, 2003
Lupin III: Stolen Lupin ~The Copy Cat is a Midsummer's Butterfly~ July 30, 2004
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and the Star of Christmas December 24, 2004
Lupin III: An Angel's Tactics – Fragments of a Dream Are the Scent of Murder July 22, 2005
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman's Jin-Jin-Jingle Bells December 23, 2005
Lupin III: Seven Days Rhapsody September 8, 2006
Let's Go! Anpanman: Sing! Dance! Everybody's Christmas December 22, 2006
Lupin III: Elusiveness of the Fog July 27, 2007
Let's Go! Anpanman: Kokin-chan and the Christmas of Tears December 21, 2007
Lupin III: Sweet Lost Night ~Magic Lamp's Nightmare Premonition~ July 25, 2008
Let's Go! Anpanman: Franken-Robo-kun's Surprised Christmas December 19, 2008
Lupin III vs. Detective Conan March 27, 2009
Let's Go! Anpanman: Do Your Best Creampanda! The Christmas Adventure December 25, 2009
Lupin III: The Last Job February 12, 2010
Magic Kaito NNS (ytv) April 17, 2010 – December 29, 2012
Let's Go! Anpanman: Red-Nosed Chappy - The Christmas of Courage Nippon TV December 24, 2010
Lupin III: Blood Seal - Eternal Mermaid December 2, 2011
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and Gomira's Christmas Castle December 23, 2011
Lupin III: Record of Observations of the East November 2, 2012
Let's Go! Anpanman: Doremifa Island's Christmas December 21, 2012
Lupin III: Princess of the Breeze - Hidden City in the Sky November 15, 2013
Let's Go! Anpanman: Shine! Tin Kid's Christmas Tree December 20, 2013
Let's Go! Anpanman: Anpanman and the Letter to Santa December 19, 2014
The Disappearance of Conan Edogawa: The Worst Two Days in History December 26, 2014
Let's Go! Anpanman: Baikinman and the Lovely Christmas Present December 18, 2015
Lupin III: Italian Game January 8, 2016
Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small December 9, 2016
Let's Go! Anpanman: Poppo's Christmas Twinkle December 23, 2016
Lupin III: Goodbye Partner January 25, 2019
Lupin III: Prison of the Past November 29, 2019

Original video animations[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
2001 Nights 1987
Ace o Nerae! 2: Stage 1–6 March 1988
The Untold Legend June 1988
The Fuma Conspiracy December 1987
Return of the Magician 2002
Ace o Nerae!: Final Stage 1989
Tengai makyo: Jiraiya Oboro Hen July 1990
(Office Lady) Kaizō Kōza November 1990
Katsugeki Shōjo Tanteidan December 1990
Wizardry February 1991
Shizuka Narudon April 1991
Ozanari Dungeon September 1991
Christmas Da! Minna Atsumare! (annual Christmas releases) 1992–present
Maps 1994
Otanjōbi Series 1995
Magic Knight Rayearth July 1997
B't X NEO August 1997
Glass Mask: Sen no Kamen o Motsu Shōjo 1998
Aoyama Gōshō Tanhenshū 1999
Karakuri no Kimi 2000
Let's Go! Anpanman: Song and Dance Fun March 20, 2000
Azusa, Otetsudai Shimasu! 2004
Hamtaro Premium (4 OVAs) 2002–2004
Saint Seiya: The Lost Canvas 2009–2011

Original net animations[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s) Notes
Susume! Gachimuchi Sankyoudai June 2, 2010
Joshikousei Nobunaga-chan!! August 12, 2010February 10, 2012
Detective Conan vs. Wooo April 22June 23, 2011 This web short is an advertisement for the Wooo line of televisions in Japan.
Kubbe Kort Animasjon April 24, 2013March 30, 2014
Meitantei Conan: Toubousha Mouri Kogorou April 30, 2014
Kubbe no Ongakukai October 8, 2014March 5, 2019
Chichibu de Buchichi March 30, 2018 with 8PAN
Baki Netflix June 25December 17, 2018 with Double Eagle
#Compass August 10, 2018September 13, 2019
Bakugan Battle Brawlers: Mechtanium Surge September 7, 2018
Bakugan: Battle Planet Short Anime YouTube April 18October 17, 2019
Re:STARS December 27, 2019March 20, 2020
Baki: The Great Raitai Tournament Saga Netflix June 4, 2020
Bakugan: Geogan Rising April 2, 2021March 18, 2022
Resident Evil: Infinite Darkness July 8, 2021 With Quebico
Hanma Baki: Son of Ogre September 30, 2021
Bakugan: Evolutions
  • YouTube
  • Netflix
February 6September 1, 2022
Kanojo, Okarishimasu 2nd Season: Date Movie May 25September 25, 2022 Studio provided by AQUA ARIS
Lupin Zero HIDIVE December 16, 2022January 13, 2023
Lupin III vs. Cat's Eye Amazon Prime Video January 27, 2023 Crossover between Lupin The Third and Cat's Eye series.
Bakugan: Legends
  • YouTube
  • Netflix
March 1, 2023 Third and final season after Bakugan: Armored Alliance.
Hanma Baki: Son of Ogre 2nd Season Netflix July 26August 24, 2023
Hanma Baki vs. Kengan Ashura June 9, 2024 A crossover anime movie between Hanma Baki and Kengan Ashura.

Video games[edit]

Title Developer Contribution Year
Don Quixote: A Dream in Seven Crystals Premier International Corp. Animation 1994
The Adventures of Batman & Robin Clockwork Tortoise Lost episode cutscenes 1995
Astal Sega Cutscenes
Last Bronx Sega AM3 1996
Sakura Wars Red Company
Sega CS2 R&D
Sonic Jam Sonic Team Man of the Year short 1997
Grandia Game Arts CG animation (as Telecom Animation Film Company) 1997
Burning Rangers Sonic Team Cutscenes 1998
Lupin the 3rd: Sage of the Pyramid Asmik Ace Entertainment 1998
Magic Knight Rayearth Working Designs Animation Production 1998
Kingdom Hearts Square outside contractor: animation supervisor (as Telecom Animation Film Company) 2002
PopoloCrois G-artists
Sony Computer Entertainment
Animation 2005
Return to PopoloCrois epics
Marvelous AQL
2015
Tokyo Afterschool Summoners LifeWonders Opening Animation 2019

Foreign production history[edit]

TMS Entertainment/Telecom Animation Film[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
Mighty Orbots ABC September 8, 1984 – December 15, 1984
Sherlock Hound TV Asahi, Rai 1 1984–1985
Sweet Sea September 9, 1985[54]
The Blinkins April 5, September 6, November 29, 1986[55][56][57]
Galaxy High[58][unreliable source] CBS September 13 – December 6, 1986
Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland July 15, 1989
Reporter Blues Rai 1, NHK 1991–1996
Soccer Fever Rai 1 / NHK April 4, 1994 – April 3, 1995
Cybersix (Japanese/Canadian co-production with NOA) Teletoon, Kids Station, Telefe September 6 – November 29, 1999

DIC Entertainment[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
Ulysses 31 FR3 / Nagoya Broadcasting Network October 10, 1981 – April 3, 1982
Lupin VIII unaired 1982 (unaired)
Inspector Gadget (Season 1) Syndication September 5, 1983 – November 13, 1985
The Littles ABC September 10, 1983 – November 2, 1985
Rainbow Brite Syndication June 27, 1984 – July 24, 1986
Heathcliff and the Catillac Cats Syndication September 3, 1984 – September 30, 1985
Here Come the Littles May 24, 1985
The Real Ghostbusters ABC September 13, 1986 – October 5, 1991
Dennis the Menace Syndication September 22, 1986 – March 26, 1988
Kissyfur NBC September 13, 1986 – August 25, 1990
Sylvanian Families Syndication September 18 – December 11, 1987
ALF: The Animated Series NBC September 26, 1987 – January 7, 1989
Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog Syndication September 6, 1993 – November 24, 1996

Disney Television Animation[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
The Wuzzles CBS September 14 – December 7, 1985
Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears (Season 1 to 4) NBC
ABC
September 14, 1985 – February 22, 1991
Fluppy Dogs ABC November 27, 1986
DuckTales (Season 1) Syndication September 18, 1987 – November 28, 1990
The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (Season 1 and half of Season 2) The Disney Channel
ABC
January 17, 1988 – October 26, 1991
Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers (Season 1) The Disney Channel
Syndication
August 27, 1988 – November 19, 1990
Gargoyles (Assistance for Walt Disney Animation Japan, "Hunter's Moon, Part 2") Syndication
ABC
October 24, 1994 – February 15, 1997
Winnie the Pooh: Seasons of Giving (Assistance for Walt Disney Animation Australia) Direct to Video November 9, 1999
The Tigger Movie (Assistance for Walt Disney Animation Japan) February 11, 2000

Warner Bros. Animation[edit]

Title Broadcast network(s) Year(s)
Tiny Toon Adventures Syndication / Fox Kids September 14, 1990 – May 28, 1995
Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation March 11, 1992
Batman: The Animated Series Fox Kids September 5, 1992 – September 15, 1995
Animaniacs Fox Kids / The WB September 13, 1993 – November 14, 1998
Pinky and the Brain ("A Pinky and the Brain Christmas") The WB September 9, 1995 – November 14, 1998
The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries (First season) September 9, 1995 – December 18, 2002
Superman: The Animated Series September 6, 1996 – February 12, 2000
Waynehead (Opening) October 19, 1996 – May 17, 1997
The New Batman Adventures The WB September 13, 1997 – January 16, 1999
The Batman/Superman Movie: World's Finest October 4, 1997
Wakko's Wish December 21, 1999
Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker December 12, 2000
Green Lantern: First Flight July 28, 2009
Justice League: Doom February 28, 2012
Superman vs. The Elite June 12, 2012

Other productions[edit]

Title Production company(s) Year(s)
The New Adventures of Zorro Filmation September 12 – December 5, 1981
The Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers Gaylord Entertainment Company September 14 – December 11, 1986
Bionic Six MCA Television April 6 − November 12, 1987
Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light Sunbow Productions September 21 – December 14, 1987
Peter Pan and the Pirates Fox Children's Productions
Southern Star Productions
September 8, 1990 – September 10, 1991
Spider-Man: The Animated Series Marvel Films Animation November 19, 1994 – January 31, 1998
An American Tail 3: The Treasure of Manhattan Island Universal Cartoon Studios November 16, 1998
Bakugan: Battle Planet Nelvana, Spin Master Entertainment December 31, 2018 – March 1, 2023

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ キョクイチ東京ムービー, Kyokuichi-Tōkyō Mūbī
  2. ^ a b Originally, TMS stood for Tokyo Movie Shinsha.
  3. ^ 株式会社東京ムービー, Tōkyō Mūbī
  4. ^ 株式会社東京ムービー新社, Kabushiki gaisha Tōkyō Mūbī Shinsha, lit.'Tokyo Movie New-company'
  5. ^ This partnership would last until 1986, when DiC opened its own Japan-based animation facility known as K.K. DIC Asia (later Creativity & Development Asia) in 1983, for animation production on its shows in order to bypass overseas animation subcontractors.[citation needed]
  6. ^ Nagahama died during production, making this his last work.
  7. ^ The story depicts the future of the world of Lupin III, and features the descendants of the Lupin family.
  8. ^ Mighty Orbots was the first time a Japanese animation studio had received an order directly from an American TV station without going through an American production company.
  9. ^ Initially, Space Cobra was reported in Japanese anime magazines as a Japanese-Italian co-production, but when production actually began, that story was dropped.
  10. ^ Miyazaki later reused them for Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind and Princess Mononoke.
  11. ^ There is an anecdote about an American staff member who later saw Miyazaki's sketch and sternly asked those involved why they did not adopt it.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "COMPANY OVERVIEW". TMS ENTERTAINMENT CO., LTD. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "会社概要" [COMPANY OVERVIEW]. Toyo Keizai Online (in Japanese). TMS ENTERTAINMENT CO., LTD. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  3. ^ a b c "トムス・エンタテインメント 鈴木義治社長"新たな事業領域に対応"" [TMS Entertainment President Yoshiharu Suzuki: "Adapting to new business areas"] (in Japanese). bunkatsushin.com. October 16, 2018. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  4. ^ a b c d "外部スタジオ制作作品をプロデュース、トムスが「UNLIMITED PRODUCE プロジェクト」スタート" [TMS started "UNLIMITED PRODUCE Project" to produce works produced by outside studios] (in Japanese). Animation Business Journal. July 1, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "宮崎駿も降板、壮大すぎたアニメ「NEMO/ニモ」映画より面白い制作過程!" [Director Hayao Miyazaki also quit the project. The production process of the overly grandiose animation "Nemo", more interesting than the film itself!]. Re:minder (in Japanese). November 22, 2019. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  6. ^ a b "About us | テレコム・アニメーションフィルム オフィシャルサイト". Telecom. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  7. ^ Cybersix: The Complete Series DVD Commentary
  8. ^ "思い出のキャラ図鑑". Ningyonoie.com. Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  9. ^ "COMPANY INFORMATION". TMS ENTERTAINMENT CO., LTD. Retrieved 3 January 2021.
  10. ^ a b c "日本のアニメ100周年記念 「これからのアニメとこれまでのアニメ」" [Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Japanese anime: "Anime of the future and anime of the past"]. Anime NEXT_100 (in Japanese). The Association of Japanese Animations. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on August 15, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  11. ^ "Hayao Miyazaki //". Nausicaa.net. 1941-01-05. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  12. ^ Odell, Collin; le Blanc, Michelle (June 26, 2015). "Background". Studio Ghibli: The Films of Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata (Second ed.). Kamera Books. ISBN 978-1843444893. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Nishikawa, Akiyuki (September 22, 2019). "日本アニメ海外進出の先鞭をつけた野心作 NEMO ニモ(東宝東和)" [Nemo (Toho Towa), an ambitious work that pioneered the overseas expansion of Japanese animation.]. Magmix (in Japanese). Media Vague. Archived from the original on November 26, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  14. ^ a b c d e f "宮崎駿監督幻の米デビュー作『リトル・ニモ』 企画途中で離脱も、数々の出会いと「名作」が生まれ…(1)" [Director Hayao Miyazaki's elusive US debut film "Little Nemo": Despite his departure midway through the project, many encounters and a "masterpiece" were born... (1)]. Magmix (in Japanese). Media Vague. December 2, 2021. p. 1. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  15. ^ a b c d e f "宮崎駿監督幻の米デビュー作『リトル・ニモ』 企画途中で離脱も、数々の出会いと「名作」が生まれ…(2)" [Director Hayao Miyazaki's elusive US debut film "Little Nemo": Despite his departure midway through the project, many encounters and a "masterpiece" were born... (2)]. Magmix (in Japanese). Media Vague. December 2, 2021. p. 2. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  16. ^ "練馬にいた! アニメの巨人たち 第16回 高畑 勲さん(アニメーション映画監督)その2" [They were in Nerima! Giants of Anime Vol. 16: Isao Takahata (animation film director) Part 2] (in Japanese). Nerima Animation Site. October 2018. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  17. ^ a b c "アニメ様の七転八倒 第160回 大物監督達の海外合作作品" [Anime-sama's Seven Ups and Eight Downs No. 160: International co-productions by big-name directors]. WEB Anime Style (in Japanese). Style. July 3, 2009. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  18. ^ a b "アニメ様の七転八倒 第159回 無音で上映された『名探偵ホームズ』" [Anime-sama's Seven Ups and Eight Downs No. 159: "Sherlock Hound" shown without sound]. WEB Anime Style (in Japanese). Style. July 2, 2009. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  19. ^ a b c d "【1980年代 (3)】宮崎駿作品でもヒットしなかった時代" [[1980s (3)] The era when even Hayao Miyazaki’s works were not hits]. Kakuyomu (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. December 2, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  20. ^ a b "日本最小のフィルム映画館で傑作アニメ『リトル・ニモ』が現代に蘇る! 《『リトル・ニモ』と80年代テレコム・アニメーションの世界》開催" ["Little Nemo" comes back to life in Japan's smallest film cinema! "Little Nemo and the World of Telecom Animation in the 80s" will be held]. valuepress (in Japanese). Cinema Novecento. April 5, 2019. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  21. ^ a b c Oguro, Yuichiro (November 21, 2005). "アニメ様の七転八倒 第22回 日本アニメ史 空前の大プロジェクト" [Anime-sama's Seven Ups and Eight Downs No. 22: The Unprecedented Project in Japanese Anime History]. Web Anime Style (in Japanese). Style Inc. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h "宮崎駿監督幻の米デビュー作『リトル・ニモ』 企画途中で離脱も、数々の出会いと「名作」が生まれ…(3)" [Director Hayao Miyazaki's elusive US debut film "Little Nemo": Despite his departure midway through the project, many encounters and a "masterpiece" were born... (3)]. Magmix (in Japanese). Media Vague. December 2, 2021. p. 3. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  23. ^ Shimizu, Koji (January 14, 2004). "「ロサンゼルスの思い出2 ゲーリー・カーツ(Gary Kurtz)さん、フランクトーマスさんとオーリー・ジョンストンさん、池内辰夫さん(池ちゃん)と大塚康生さん」" [Memories of Los Angeles 2 Gary Kurtz, Frank Thomas, Ollie Johnston, Tatsuo Ikeuchi (Ikechan) and Yasuo Otsuka] (in Japanese). NINGYONOIE ARCHIVES. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  24. ^ a b "セガの歴史" [History of Sega]. Sega Official Website (in Japanese). Sega. Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  25. ^ "Merrill Lynch ups stake in TMS". The Japan Times. 2003-12-31. Retrieved 9 January 2017.
  26. ^ "Fun Biz Vol.2 第2期中間事業報告書 (2005年4月1日〜2005年9月30日)" [Fun Biz Vol.2 Second Interim Business Report (April 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005)] (in Japanese). Sega Sammy Holdings. Retrieved June 5, 2024.
  27. ^ トムス・エンタテインメント制作部門、新スタジオ業務開始のお知らせ
  28. ^ "沿革" [History]. Sega Sammy Holdings Official Website (in Japanese). Retrieved June 5, 2024.
  29. ^ "セガ、「セガゲームス」に社名変更 構造改革でグループ再編" [Sega changes its name to "Sega Games" as part of a restructuring and group reorganization]. ITmedia News (in Japanese). ITmedia. February 12, 2015. Retrieved May 30, 2024.
  30. ^ a b "MARZAについて" [About MARZA]. Marza Animation Planet Official Website (in Japanese). Retrieved June 9, 2024.
  31. ^ 持続可能な日本のアニメ産業の未来をつくるための新しい挑戦 - クリエイターと共に〈漫画、WEB動画〉を創って、届けて、育てていく場所 “原作工房TMS-Lab(ティー・エム・エス ラボ)”がスタート
  32. ^ クリエイターといっしょに創って、さまざまな場所から届けて、楽しんでくれるみんなで育ててく原作創出レーベル「TMSLab(トムスラボ)」 - 12/22(木)本始動!新連載&新番組スタート
  33. ^ トムス・エンタテインメントの新事業ブロードバンド動画配信のサービス内容決定!
  34. ^ トムス・エンタテインメントが名作アニメの動画を配信 EZweb公式サイトにて『東京ムービー』サービス開始
  35. ^ a b トムス・エンタテインメント100%子会社、トムス・ミュージック、イギリスおよび香港法人設立 音楽出版の現地法人を拠点にグローバルな楽曲管理・開発に新展開
  36. ^ トムス・エンタテインメント初のボウリング施設「AG BOWL」がオープン ~アミューズメント施設「AG SQUARE石岡店」隣に、バッティング等を併設した ボウリング施設「AG BOWL(エージーボウル)」が4月26日(土)にグランドオープン~
  37. ^ 「それいけ!アンパンマン」デジタルコンテンツ事業体 フレーベル館、 トムス・エンタテインメント、 日本テレビ放送網 3社共同出資によるアンパンマンデジタルLLP(有限責任事業組合)設立
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  47. ^ The Thousand Musketeers (in Japanese). Event occurs at opening credits. 制作 - TMS / だぶるいーぐる [Production - TMS Entertainment / Double Eagle]
  48. ^ Dr. Stone (in Japanese). Event occurs at opening credits. アニメーション制作 - TMS / 8PAN [Animation Production - TMS Entertainment / 8PAN]
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