TPC Twin Cities

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TPC Twin Cities
Club information
TPC Twin Cities is located in the US
TPC Twin Cities
TPC Twin Cities is located in Minnesota
TPC Twin Cities
Coordinates 45°10′37″N 93°12′47″W / 45.177°N 93.213°W / 45.177; -93.213Coordinates: 45°10′37″N 93°12′47″W / 45.177°N 93.213°W / 45.177; -93.213
Location Blaine, Minnesota, U.S.
Elevation 900 feet (275 m)
Established 2000; 18 years ago (2000)
Type Private
Operated by PGA Tour TPC Network
Total holes 18
Tournaments hosted 3M Championship (2001-2018)
3M Open (starting 2019)
Website tpc.com/twincities
Designed by Arnold Palmer,
with Tom Lehman
Par 72
Length 7,164 yards (6,551 m)[1]
Course rating 75.4
Slope rating 143 [1][2]
Course record 60; Paul Goydos (2017)

TPC Twin Cities is a private golf club in the north central United States, located within the subdivision of Deacon’s Walk in Blaine, Minnesota, a suburb north of Minneapolis.

Opened in 2000, the 18-hole championship golf course was designed by Arnold Palmer in consultation with Tom Lehman; it is a member of the Tournament Players Club network operated by the PGA Tour. Since 2001, it has hosted the 3M Championship on the PGA Tour Champions.[3][4] On June 18, 2018, it was announced that the 3M Championship would end after 2018, and be replaced by the 3M Open, a PGA Tour event starting in 2019.[5]

Course[edit]

Back tees

Hole Yards Par Hole Yards Par
1 426 4 10 379 4
2 388 4 11 414 4
3 546 5 12 593 5
4 177 3 13 228 3
5 418 4 14 423 4
6 571 5 15 451 4
7 318 4 16 387 4
8 204 3 17 184 3
9 475 4 18 582 5
Out 3,523 36 In 3,641 36
Source:[1] Total 7,164 72

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Scorecard". TPC Twin Cities. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Course Rating and Slope Database™ - TPC Twin Cities". USGA. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  3. ^ "Golf: Senior 3M Championship". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). August 13, 2001. p. C4. 
  4. ^ "Inside the Champions Tour course: TPC Twin Cities". PGA Tour. July 18, 2008. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 
  5. ^ "It's official: Minnesota getting stop on PGA Tour starting in 2019". Star Tribune. Retrieved 18 June 2018. 

External links[edit]