Tabai Matson

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Tabai Matson
Tabai Matson 2015.jpg
Matson in 2015
Birth nameJohn Tabaiwalu Fakavale Matson
Date of birth (1973-05-14) 14 May 1973 (age 46)
Place of birthNausori Hospital, Fiji
Height1.92 m (6 ft 4 in)
Weight104 kg (16 st 5 lb; 229 lb)
SchoolChrist's College
UniversityLincoln University
Occupation(s)Professional Rugby Coach
Rugby union career
Position(s) Centre
All Black No. 950
Senior career
Years Team Apps (Points)
1998–2000
2000–01
2001–06
CA Brive
London Irish
Yamaha Júbilo
()
Provincial / State sides
Years Team Apps (Points)
1994–97 Canterbury 58 ()
Super Rugby
Years Team Apps (Points)
1996–98 Crusaders 25 (30)
National team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
1995–96
1999
New Zealand
Fiji
0
2
(0)
(0)
Teams coached
Years Team
2005–06
2006
2007–08
2009–11
2012
2013–2016
2015
2016–2017
2018–
Yamaha Júbilo
University of Queensland (Assistant)
Gold Coast Breakers
Canterbury (Assistant)
Canterbury Head Coach
Crusaders (Assistant)
Fiji (Attack)
Bath
Chiefs (Assistant)

John Tabaiwalu Fakavale Matson (born 14 May 1973) is a New Zealand rugby union coach and a former New Zealand and Fiji rugby union representative. A centre, Matson represented Canterbury at a provincial level and the Crusaders in Super Rugby. He was a member of the New Zealand national side, the All Blacks, in 1995 and 1996, playing 10 matches but no internationals.[1] He played two matches for Fiji at the 1999 Rugby World Cup.[2]

Matson, an assistant coach for the past 3 years for the Crusaders in the Super Rugby competition. He has held both Attack and Defence roles for them during his time and is a specialist backs coach.

Matson is also the first non-Māori to coach the Māori All Blacks, assisting Head Coach Colin Cooper since 2013 [3]

After Coaching the Māori All Blacks in their test victory against the Flying Fijians in June 2015,[4] he joined Fiji where they went on to win the Pacific Nations Cup in Vancouver, Canada[5] and then onto the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

He returned to New Zealand in 2009 acting as Canterbury assistant coach, before promoting up to head coach in 2012. He led Canterbury to their fifth consecutive ITM Cup title by winning the 2012 ITM Cup which set potentially an unbeaten run of victories in arguably the toughest Provincial Rugby Competition in the world.

In 2012 he was hired by the Brazil Rugby Federation as a consultant as they began their journey towards the Rio Olympics. He was focused on staging a training camp for the National Men's 15-a-side team and the Women's 7's team.[6]

In 2009 he help to reinvigorate the oldest Senior club on the gold coast as the Director of Rugby and Head coach of the 1st Grade Team they went on to win the Club Championships (in his absence as he joined Canterbury as an assistant near the end of the season).[7]

Matson formally played and coached Yamaha Júbilo in his final 3 seasons for the club. He went on to become assistant coach and player at the University of Queensland before becoming head coach of the Gold Coast Breakers in 2007.

Matson attended Nelson College from 1985 to 1986,[8] before completing his secondary education at Christ's College in Christchurch.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Knight, Lindsay. "Mac Geddes". New Zealand Rugby Museum. Retrieved 14 July 2013.
  2. ^ "Tabai Matson". International High Performance Unit. Canterbury Rugby Football Union. Archived from the original on 24 September 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  3. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pU65SFt4IOE
  4. ^ "Tabai Matson to be part of the Flying Fijians during the Rugby World Cup". Retrieved 22 September 2015.
  5. ^ "Fiji survive Samoan fight-back to win Pacific Nations Cup". Retrieved 22 September 2015.
  6. ^ "Brazil tours New Zealand on Olympic rugby mission - China.org.cn". china.org.cn. Retrieved 22 September 2015.
  7. ^ "RugbyNet - Gold Coast Rugby Union Football Club Inc (Eagles)". goldcoasteagles.rugbynet.com.au. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  8. ^ "Rugby" (PDF). The Bulletin. Nelson College: 7. April 2013. Retrieved 6 August 2014.