Tack (sailing)

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In sailing, tack is a corner of a sail on the lower leading edge. Separately, tack describes which side of a sailing vessel the wind is coming from while under way—port or starboard. Tacking or jibing is the maneuver of turning between starboard and port tack.

Sail corner[edit]

As a part of a sail, the tack is the lower corner of the sail's leading edge. On a sloop rigged sailboat, the mainsail tack is connected to the mast and the boom at the gooseneck. On the same boat, a foresail tack is clipped to the deck and forestay.[1]

Wind direction on sailing vessel[edit]

This vessel is on port tack.

As a point of reference, tack is the alignment of the wind with respect to a vessel under sail. If the wind is from starboard, the vessel is on "starboard tack", and if from port, on "port tack".[2]

The "rules of the road" for ships and boats declare that when the courses of two sailing vessels converge, the vessel on port tack must give way to a vessel on starboard tack.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Desoutter, Denny (2012). The Adlard Coles Book of Boatwords. London: A&C Black. p. 187. ISBN 1408126761. 
  2. ^ Desoutter, Denny (2012). The Adlard Coles Book of Boatwords. London: A&C Black. p. 220. ISBN 1408126761. 
  3. ^ Desoutter, Denny (2012). The Adlard Coles Book of Boatwords. London: A&C Black. p. 210. ISBN 1408126761. 

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rousmaniere, John, The Annapolis Book of Seamanship, Simon & Schuster, 1999
  • Chapman Book of Piloting (various contributors), Hearst Corporation, 1999
  • Herreshoff, Halsey (consulting editor), The Sailor’s Handbook, Little Brown and Company
  • Seidman, David, The Complete Sailor, International Marine, 1995
  • Jobson, Gary, Sailing Fundamentals, Simon & Schuster, 1987