Tahquitz Falls

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Tahquitz Falls
Tahquitz Falls 1.jpg
Tahquitz Falls, facing west
Location Tahquitz Canyon
Coordinates 33°48′13″N 116°33′42″W / 33.8036°N 116.5617°W / 33.8036; -116.5617Coordinates: 33°48′13″N 116°33′42″W / 33.8036°N 116.5617°W / 33.8036; -116.5617
Type Staircase
Elevation 890 ft (270 m)
Total height 60 ft (18 m)

Tahquitz Falls is a waterfall on Tahquitz River in the west skirt of the city Palm Springs, in the U.S. state of California. The waterfall is located in lower Tahquitz Canyon, a short distance upstream from the Visitor Center. The name of the canyon and its waterfall is from a Cahuilla native of the Agua Caliente folklore.[1]

The river flows over a slab of granite atop the falls, after which it plunges about 60 feet (18 m)[2] into a pool. The fall is split once by a protrusion on the face of the canyon wall. The Tahquitz Falls is in the boundaries included in the National Register of Historic Places.

Access[edit]

The falls are easily reached by proceeding upstream along the Tahquitz Canyon Trail. The trail gains approximately 350 feet in altitude and runs past the waterfall forming a loop that returns back to the waterfall and to the Visitor Center.[1] The canyon and its trail are owned and managed by the Agua Calientes Band of Cahuilla Indians.[3]

In popular culture[edit]

The Tahquitz Falls were used as a scene in Frank Capra's 1937 film, Lost Horizon.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lister, Priscilla (22 Feb 2013). "Palm Springs hiking, from sand to snow". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  2. ^ "Tahquitz Falls Riverside County, California". Northwest Waterfall Survey. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  3. ^ Schad, Jerry (23 Dec 2004). "From hippie hangout to Indian natural preserve, Tahquitz Canyon outside Palm Springs remains a popular place to visit". San Diego Reader. Retrieved 29 August 2017. 
  4. ^ Lost Horizon at the American Film Institute Catalog