Taiwan Statebuilding Party

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Taiwan Statebuilding Party

台灣基進黨
ChairpersonChen Yi-chi
Founded15 May 2016 (2016-05-15) (as Taiwan Radical Wings)
HeadquartersKaohsiung, Taiwan
Ideology
Political positionLeft-wing[3][4]
National affiliationPan-Green Coalition[5]
Legislative Yuan
1 / 113
Municipal mayors
0 / 6
Magistrates/mayors
0 / 16
Councillors
0 / 912
Township/city mayors
0 / 204
Website
https://statebuilding.tw/
Chairperson Chen Yi-chi

The Taiwan Statebuilding Party (TSP; Chinese: 台灣基進黨) is a political party in Taiwan which advocates Taiwan independence. The party was established in 2016 as Taiwan Radical Wings.[6] It is supportive of the Democratic Progressive Party.[2]

As of 2018, the chairperson was Chen Yi-chi.[7]

In the 2020 legislative elections in Taiwan, the party won one seat, with Chen Po-wei becoming its first member of the Legislative Yuan.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Taiwan Statebuilding Party Platform(Chinese)
  2. ^ a b c Chris Chang (28 December 2019). "Voices of the 2020 Taiwan legislative elections: Taiwan Statebuilding Party". Taiwan News. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Record number of smaller parties seek legislative seats in Taiwan election". The Straits Times. 9 January 2020. Retrieved 16 February 2020. ...left-leaning Taiwan Statebuilding Party and the NPP are popular with younger voters.
  4. ^ "Taiwan Activist's Wife Calls on China to Allow Him Home For Funeral". Radio Free Asia. Retrieved 16 February 2020. Lin Yu-ming of the left-wing, pro-independence Taiwan State Building Party said that China is increasingly seeking to inflence the democratic island's 23 million residents ahead of presidential elections in 2020, at which Tsai is seeking re-election.
  5. ^ "2020 ELECTIONS / DPP retains legislative majority, KMT gains seats". 11 January 2020. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  6. ^ Ng, Kang-chung (8 May 2019). "Pro-independence Taiwanese party broadcasts recording of woman claiming to be Hong Kong localist who fled the city ahead of Mong Kok riot trial". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  7. ^ William Yang (20 October 2018). "Taiwan's independence rally draws thousands, irks China". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  8. ^ Ching-Tse Cheng (11 January 2020). "Taiwan Statebuilding Party candidate wins in KMT stronghold". Taiwan News. Retrieved 11 January 2020.

External links[edit]