Take Command Console

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Take Command Console
Developer(s)JP Software
Stable release23.0 Build 29[1] (September 5, 2018; 4 months ago (2018-09-05)) [±]
Operating systemServer 2003, Server 2008, Vista, 7, 8, 10[1]
PlatformMicrosoft Windows (Intel x86 32-bit/64-bit)[1]
TypeCommand shell
LicenseProprietary commercial
Websitejpsoft.com

Take Command Console (TCC), formerly known as 4DOS for Windows NT (4NT), is a command line interpreter by JP Software, designed as a substitute for the default command interpreter in Microsoft Windows, CMD.EXE.[2][discuss][3]

Take Command was the name that JP Software used for their GUI command-line interpreters for Windows 3.1 (TC16), Windows 32-bit (TC32) and later OS/2 Presentation Manager (TCOS2). These were released concurrently with version 4DOS 5.5, 4NT 2.5 and 4OS2 2.52. The OS/2 and Windows 16-bit survived until version 2.02, they are still available for download from the FTP site on JP Software.

History[edit]

TCC is based on the earlier 4DOS command shell for DOS, and 4OS2 for OS/2.[4]

The NDOS interpreter and batch file extensions included with several Norton Utilities implementations prior to 2000 is a lightly modified and extended 4DOS interpreter.

Beginning with version 12 of 4NT, support for Windows 95, 98, ME, NT and 2000 were removed. Beginning with version 16 of TCC, support for Windows XP was removed,[1] although it might still run in XP. 4NT was renamed to Take Command Console as part of JP Software's Take Command version 9. Beginning with version 9, the name Take Command was applied to an entirely different assembly of products: TCI (Tabbed Command Interface) and 4NT. The original Take Command is no longer being developed. TCI was expanded to include a file manager and various other windows, while 4NT was renamed TCC, and issued in "light" form.

Features[edit]

TCC provides a rich set of command line and batch programming capabilities. It can work in conjunction with other scripting languages, such as REXX, Ruby and Perl, or Windows Scripting languages, in the form of Active Scripting engines such as VBScript and JScript as well as PerlScript (via ActivePerl), TclScript (via ActiveTcl), PythonScript (via ActivePython), and the scripting engine version of Object REXX to provide greater access to the operating system.

TCC features a number of enhancements when compared to CMD.EXE[5]

Take Command[edit]

Take Command is a command-line interpreter for the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems. Its advantages over the regular command shell are analogous to those of 4DOS over the COMMAND.COM supplied with MS-DOS.

Beginning with version 9, Tabbed Console Interface and 4NT have been merged into the Take Command product line. 4NT was renamed to Take Command Console, with a Lite Edition (TCC/LE) released as freeware. Take Command includes a tabbed interface, configurable toolbars, and an integrated graphical file explorer. Take Command adds a built-in batch file editor and debugger, FTP and HTTP file access in commands, network file system access, Active Scripting integration, system monitoring commands, and Windows service controls.

Features of note include:


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Take Command and TCC/LE Downloads
  2. ^ "Take Command is a powerful Windows GUI command interpreter", todaysoftware.net
  3. ^ "Review: Take Command 14 command line utility is easier to use than PowerShell" by Erez Zukerman, PC World, 30 November 2012
  4. ^ Nathan A. Culp (2 February 2014). "Take Command Is the Best Kept Secret in the Computer Programming Industry!". Beaufort, South Carolina: The Computer Repair Man.
  5. ^ Product Comparison:
  6. ^ "Take Command review" by Ian Harac, PC Advisor, 23 September 2009

External links[edit]