Take Root

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In an image from the Take Root website, members of Take Root hold their own missing child posters

Take Root, a non-profit organization established on a grant from the United States Department of Justice,[1][2][3] is the first missing-child organization ever founded by former abducted children.[4][5] Founded in 2003 and incorporated as a 501(c)(3) in 2005, over five hundred former abducted children have participated, providing peer support to fellow former abducted children, advocating on child-abduction issues from the child-victim's perspective, and providing landmark information on the victimology of child-abduction to multidisciplinary professionals, impacted families, and the public.[5] The agency's mission is to "insert the voice of the primary victim into public and policy discussions on abduction, using the collected wisdom of former missing-children to improve America's missing-child response." Their tags-line are "beyond recovering missing-children; to helping missing-children recover" and, "where missing children are seen and heard." Take Root is the brain child of Melissa "Liss" Haviv, a Fulbright Scholar in cultural anthropology and former abduction victim who is considered a leading expert in the victimology of long term child abduction [5][6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Take Root official web site home page See note in lower left-hand corner of home page; retrieved October 19, 2007
  2. ^ Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Programs government web site retrieved October 19, 2007
  3. ^ Practitioner Resources web site on grants retrieved October 19, 2007
  4. ^ "When The Missing Return, Recovery Is Long, Too". NPR.org. Retrieved 2016-11-25. 
  5. ^ a b c Broughton, Daniel D. (2015-09-10). Perspectives on Missing Persons Cases. Carolina Academic Press. ISBN 9781611635164. 
  6. ^ NPR story on Take Root
  7. ^ Take Root official web site
  8. ^ "Family abduction takes bitter toll on victims". msnbc.com. 2006-05-15. Retrieved 2016-11-25.