Takeshi Rikio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Takeshi Inoue
Born (1972-12-20) December 20, 1972 (age 44)[1]
Sakurai, Nara, Japan[1]
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Takeshi Rikiō
Billed height 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in)[1]
Billed weight 125 kg (276 lb)[1]
Trained by AJPW Dojo
Debut May 28, 2000[1]
Retired November 27, 2011

Takeshi Inoue, known by his stage name Takeshi Rikiō (力皇猛, Rikiō Takeshi),[2] born December 20, 1972, is a Japanese retired professional wrestler, who worked for Pro Wrestling Noah. He is also a former sumo wrestler.

Sumo career[edit]

He made his sumo debut in March 1988, after leaving junior high school. He joined at the same time as future yokozuna Takanohana and Wakanohana. He initially trained at the same stable as these two, Futagoyama-beya, but when former yokozuna Takanosato branched off to set up Naruto-beya in March 1989, Inoue was one of the young recruits to follow him to the new stable. He also changed his shikona, or fighting name, from Futagozakura to Rikio. In July 1993 he was promoted to the second highest jūryō division, becoming the first wrestler from Naruto stable to reach elite sekitori status. He was demoted from that division after just one tournament, but returned to jūryō in May 1994 and was promoted to the top makuuchi division in July 1996 after winning his second jūryō yūshō, or tournament championship. In September 1997 he was promoted to his highest rank of maegashira 4, but he did not take part in the tournament. This was initially said to be due to a liver disorder, but it was later revealed that relations with his stablemaster had broken down, and Rikio was forced to retire from sumo. Due to the dispute he was unable to have a formal retirement ceremony, but some of his friends in the sumo world organised an informal one for him in early 1998, with Akebono and Konishiki among the attendees.

Professional wrestling career[edit]

After leaving sumo he was soon spotted by All Japan Pro Wrestling. After training in their dojo, he made his debut in 2000 in a tag team match in which he partnered Masao Inoue against Takeshi Morishima and Jun Akiyama. However, before he could build any momentum, Mitsuharu Misawa left AJPW and in the process, took most of the native talent with Rikio being among these talents. In Pro Wrestling Noah, he has seen much success. He dethroned the legendary Kenta Kobashi for the GHC Heavyweight Championship (at the end of this match Rikio can be seen sobbing as he accepts the title from Kobashi.), ending his two-year reign, before losing the title to Akira Taue some time later. His title reign was largely regarded as rushed and not well-developed, as some portions of the crowd were not enthusiastic about his defenses or the opponents he was defending the title against. On June 4, 2006, he captured his second GHC Tag Team Championship with Jun Akiyama when he pinned Muhammad Yone after a Musou. However, Rikio and Akiyama were forced to vacate their title on September 25, 2006 after Rikio suffered a neck injury.

On November 27, 2011, Rikio announced his retirement from professional wrestling due to serious neck injuries.

In wrestling[edit]

  • Finishing moves
  • Signature moves
  • Double team finishing moves
  • Rikibono Splash 63 (Akebono performs a diving splash with Rikio on his back)[3]

Championships and accomplishments[edit]

  • Rookie of the Year (2000)[7]
  • Performance Award (2005)[8]

Sumo career record[edit]

Rikio Takeshi[9]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1988 x (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #17
4–3
 
East Jonidan #127
4–3
 
East Jonidan #93
3–4
 
East Jonidan #114
7–0–P
 
1989 East Sandanme #101
3–4
 
West Jonidan #17
4–3
 
West Sandanme #93
4–3
 
East Sandanme #71
4–3
 
West Sandanme #52
3–4
 
East Sandanme #67
1–1–5
 
1990 West Jonidan #8
3–4
 
East Jonidan #34
5–2
 
West Sandanme #97
6–1
 
East Sandanme #42
3–4
 
East Sandanme #61
3–4
 
West Sandanme #76
6–1
 
1991 East Sandanme #25
2–5
 
East Sandanme #50
5–2
 
West Sandanme #21
5–2
 
West Makushita #56
4–3
 
East Makushita #43
6–1
 
East Makushita #19
3–4
 
1992 East Makushita #26
3–4
 
West Makushita #34
6–1
 
East Makushita #14
4–3
 
West Makushita #8
5–2
 
West Makushita #2
3–4
 
East Makushita #7
4–3
 
1993 East Makushita #4
3–4
 
East Makushita #7
4–3
 
West Makushita #3
5–2
 
East Jūryō #12
6–9
 
East Makushita #2
3–4
 
West Makushita #5
3–4
 
1994 East Makushita #9
4–3
 
East Makushita #5
4–3
 
West Jūryō #13
8–7
 
East Jūryō #12
8–7
 
East Jūryō #9
7–8
 
East Jūryō #11
9–6
 
1995 East Jūryō #8
8–7
 
East Jūryō #7
9–6
 
East Jūryō #4
10–5
 
West Jūryō #2
5–10
 
East Jūryō #7
9–6
 
West Jūryō #2
4–11
 
1996 East Jūryō #9
10–5–P
Champion

 
West Jūryō #4
9–6
 
West Jūryō #3
12–3
 
West Maegashira #14
9–6
 
West Maegashira #9
6–9
 
East Maegashira #15
8–7
 
1997 West Maegashira #13
8–7
 
East Maegashira #12
6–9
 
West Maegashira #15
8–7
 
East Maegashira #12
9–6
 
West Maegashira #4
Retired
0–0
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]