Talamanca (canton)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Talamanca
Official seal of Talamanca
Seal
Talamanca canton
Talamanca canton location in Costa Rica
Talamanca canton location in Costa Rica
Talamanca
Talamanca canton location in Costa Rica
Coordinates: 9°25′07″N 83°01′12″W / 9.4186631°N 83.0200471°W / 9.4186631; -83.0200471Coordinates: 9°25′07″N 83°01′12″W / 9.4186631°N 83.0200471°W / 9.4186631; -83.0200471
Country Costa Rica
ProvinceLimón
Creation20 May 1969[1]
Head cityBribri
Districts
Government
 • TypeMunicipality
 • BodyMunicipalidad de Talamanca
Area
 • Total2,809.93 km2 (1,084.92 sq mi)
Elevation
29 m (95 ft)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total30,712
 • Density11/km2 (28/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC−06:00
Canton code704

Talamanca is a canton in the Limón province of Costa Rica.[2][3] The head city is Bribri, located in Bratsi district.

History[edit]

Talamanca was created on 20 May 1969 by decree 4339.[1]

Geography[edit]

Talamanca has an area of 2,809.93 km²[4] and a mean elevation of 29 metres.[2]

The county is noted for its beautiful beaches, especially in Cahuita and Puerto Viejo (Old Harbor), which are popular tourist locations.

Talamanca contains one of Costa Rica's three official border-crossing points with Panamá, the Sixaola-Guabito crossing.

Districts[edit]

The canton of Talamanca is subdivided into the following districts:

  1. Bratsi
  2. Sixaola
  3. Cahuita
  4. Telire

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19735,431
198411,013102.8%
200025,857134.8%
201130,71218.8%

Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos[5]
Centro Centroamericano de Población[6]

For the 2011 census, Talamanca had a population of 30,712 inhabitants.[7]

The county suffers from pervasive poverty. As of 2009, its human-development index is the lowest-ranked of all Costa Rican cantons.[8] While its most recent infant mortality rate is 12.89% (2009), it was as high as 22.5% (2003), and stayed above 15% between 2003 and 2007.[9] As of 2010, 52.3% of Talamanca inhabitants have access to sanitation (either piped or septic tank), and 75.2% are connected to electricity.[10]

Talamanca houses the largest indigenous population in the country (at 11,062, or 34% of the county's population), which is composed principally of the Bribri and Cabécar groups[11] The county is composed of four districts (see graphic below), with its capital city, Bribrí, located in the Bratsi district. Talamanca houses the largest indigenous population in the country (at 11,062, or 34% of the county's population), which is composed principally of the Bribri and Cabécar groups[11] (who in turn represent two of Costa Rica's eight distinct indigenous groups).[12] 31% of the district covers Talamanca's four indigenous reserves (Kekoldi, Talamanca Bribrí, Talamanca Cabécar, and Telire);

Transportation[edit]

Road transportation[edit]

The canton is covered by the following road routes:

Conservation[edit]

Eighty-eight percent of Talamanca's territory is protected. Fifty-five percent of this land falls under the Chirripó, Amistad, and Cahuita National Parks; and 2% belongs to the Jairo Mora Sandoval Gandoca-Manzanillo Mixed Wildlife Refuge (a major sea turtle nesting ground).[13]

The Costa Rican government is highly aggressive (albeit a bit slow to act)[according to whom?] in its protection of these lands. On July 27, 2011, for example, the Ministerio de Ambiente, Energía y Telecomunicaciones (Minaet) carried out the demolition of two hotels (Las Palmas and Suerre), due to their occupation of 4 hectares of land within the Jairo Mora Sandoval Gandoca-Manzanillo Mixed Wildlife Refuge. [14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hernández, Hermógenes (1985). Costa Rica: evolución territorial y principales censos de población 1502 - 1984 (in Spanish) (1 ed.). San José: Editorial Universidad Estatal a Distancia. pp. 164–173. ISBN 9977-64-243-5. Retrieved 5 October 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Declara oficial para efectos administrativos, la aprobación de la División Territorial Administrativa de la República N°41548-MGP". Sistema Costarricense de Información Jurídica (in Spanish). 19 March 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2020.
  3. ^ División Territorial Administrativa de la República de Costa Rica (PDF) (in Spanish). Editorial Digital de la Imprenta Nacional. 8 March 2017. ISBN 978-9977-58-477-5.
  4. ^ "Área en kilómetros cuadrados, según provincia, cantón y distrito administrativo". Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (in Spanish). Retrieved 26 September 2020.
  5. ^ "Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos" (in Spanish).
  6. ^ "Sistema de Consulta de a Bases de Datos Estadísticas". Centro Centroamericano de Población (in Spanish).
  7. ^ "Censo. 2011. Población total por zona y sexo, según provincia, cantón y distrito". Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (in Spanish). Retrieved 26 September 2020.
  8. ^ Álvaros, A.R. (2009, October 11). El miedo atracó en Limón. La Nación (Costa Rica). Retrieved from http://wvw.nacion.com/proa/2009/octubre/11/proa2113441.html
  9. ^ Insituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (INEC). (2009). Anuario Estadístico 2009. Retrieved from http://www.inec.go.cr
  10. ^ Insituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (INEC). (2010). Cuadro No 39: Indicadores de vividena, según provincia, cantón, y distrito. Retrieved from http://www.inec.go.cr
  11. ^ a b Insituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (INEC). (2008). Población estimada cerrada según provincia, cantón, y distrito al 31 de diciembre de cada año, 2002-2008. Retrieved from http://www.inec.go.cr
  12. ^ Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Eduación, la Cienca, y la Cultura (UNESCO). (2011). Grupos indígenas. Retrieved from http://www.unesco.or.cr/portalcultural/indigenas.htm
  13. ^ Gudiño, Arturo (21 June 2007). "Denuncian actividad minera de extranjeros en reserva indígena de Costa Rica". La Nación (in Spanish). Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  14. ^ "Imperio de la ley en Gandoca-Manzanillo". La Nación (in Spanish). 28 July 2011. Retrieved 21 November 2020.