Talk:Neutron transport

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Fixed equation for lambda: λ = h / sqrt(3kTm) (FALSE) this comes from de Broglie: λ = h/p With E=kT and p=sqrt(2Em) this gives λ = h / sqrt(2kT/m) Since the difference is ~m^2, this is obviously a BIG error numerically.

Neutron Transport, Neutronics[edit]

Neutron transport or simply Neutronics is the term used to describe the mathematical treatment of neutron and gamma ray transport through materials. There are two main types calculational technique for neutronics in common use. First, deterministic methods in which the particle flux distribution in space, angle and energy is found by solving the transport equation numerically; for example the Sn method. Second, the Monte Carlo method is used in which the physical processes involved when particles (neutron or gamma rays) interact with matter are stochastically simulated. By tallying the results generated by many particle histories, quantities of interest, eg fluxes, energy deposition etc, can be estimated. The Monte Carlo method can represent the physical system being simulated accurately and is relatively free of the numerical approximations inherent in deterministic methods. It does however have the disadvantage that the answers produced are liable to statistical uncertainty depending as they do on the number of particle histories involved. Deterministic methods are chosen for speed of calculation in simple geometries, for their ability to assess the impact of small changes and for their provision of a solution over the whole phase space of the problem. As the processing power of computers has increased however, and with the advent of massively parallel computing platforms, it has become viable to perform more geometrically complex 2 & 3 dimensional deterministic computations.

Neutron Transport, Neutronics[edit]

Neutron Transport or simply Neutronics is the term used to describe the mathematical treatment of neutron and gamma ray transport through materials. There are two main types calculational technique for neutronics in common use. First, deterministic methods in which the particle flux distribution in space, angle and energy is found by solving the transport equation numerically; for example the Sn method. Second, the Monte Carlo method is used in which the physical processes involved when particles (neutron or gamma rays) interact with matter are stochastically simulated. By tallying the results generated by many particle histories, quantities of interest, eg fluxes, energy deposition etc, can be estimated. The Monte Carlo method can represent the physical system being simulated accurately and is relatively free of the numerical approximations inherent in deterministic methods. It does however have the disadvantage that the answers produced are liable to statistical uncertainty depending as they do on the number of particle histories involved. Deterministic methods are chosen for speed of calculation in simple geometries, for their ability to assess the impact of small changes and for their provision of a solution over the whole phase space of the problem. As the processing power of computers has increased however, and with the advent of massively parallel computing platforms, it has become viable to perform more geometrically complex 2 & 3 dimensional deterministic computations.

Neutron Transport Theory[edit]

I added a section stating the neutron transport equation. It is a start to include some mathematics in this entry. Nkrupans (talk) 01:08, 1 February 2009 (UTC)