Talk:Online bingo

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Written Like an Advert[edit]

To me this article seems to be written like an advert, the article seems to be full of praise for online bingo and online bingo websites without including any criticsm of any kind. Some pieces which seem incredibly non-NPOV include "The chat application brings a different dimension to gaming." and "There are also a great variety of games to play to suit just about every interested bingo player." WikiSolved (talk) 07:19, 28 May 2009 (UTC)

I've never heard of a generic topic being called an advert before. No single company is being fawned over here. But true some of the text is terrible and should be cleaned up. 2005 (talk) 07:45, 28 May 2009 (UTC)

References[edit]

How does listing 2 online bingo sites count as references? Bingo Entertainment is not even a network - its games are on the Byworth platform! This is link spam. FeldBum 21:49, 24 May 2006 (UTC)

What are you talking about? They were refences used in writing the article. Calling it link spam is ridiculous. This is what Wikipedia is, an encyclopedia that summarizes and cites authoritative sources. Please refer to No original research and WP:CITE to understand about citing sources. Feel free to cite better/more authoritative/more specific references for article sections or anything you rewrite, but do not delete the sources used in creating substantial content in the articles. 2005 23:30, 24 May 2006 (UTC)
This article is riddled with errors and ommissions. No online bingo anywhere accepts Paypal. There is no explanation of chat games. There is no mention of how bingo network and multi-player bingo games actually work. Facts like "Bingo is now the most popular leisure activity in the UK for women between 20 and 25 years old" and "Online bingo is a multi billion dollar business" are not cited--and those facts are not found in any of the referenced sites. The information is quoted is general at best. This entire article needs a drastic rewrite, which I will do as soon as I have the time. As it stands now, that section is certainly spam. FeldBum 14:30, 25 May 2006 (UTC)
As I said, edit it to make the article better. Cite sources for important info, remove unsupported assertions like the 20 to 25 year old thing. Your comments on spam continue to make no sense since no matter what SOMETHING has to be cited as sources, but regardless the point is that if you think the article could be improved, then do so, including citing sources you use to write the content. Citing specifically is better, but generally is acceptable if you summarize general information. 2005 20:28, 25 May 2006 (UTC)


i found a few that take paypal. if you need me to cite let me know, but it seems like i am notable to site my sources for somereason because they keep getting deleted. ??

Spamming URLs in references, especially to make obvious points (some games that cost money have big prizes, while free games have smaller prizes...) is not appropriate. Additionally, Paypal refuses to take online gambling transactions, so if their is some odd site out there tricking them, that is an extreme exception, not a norm. 2005 02:32, 23 July 2006 (UTC)

I will try and work spesific winnings figures so that it is not so obvious. That will add value. I can live without paypal on there and i will look into those sources. You are probably right.

We need to see if we can find some online bingo statisitcs because under the Bingo in the UK we only quote land based statistics.


I have added some bingo statistics from a survey which was undertaken by Parlay (the biggest bingo software provider) on behalf of Chit Chat Bingo. Chit Chat is part of the St Minver network which is the biggst pan european network. I cite Chit Chat Bingo so that people can refer or contact them for more information. Parlay are already reference in the page.

I'd like to suggest that on the reference point you add a link to the WhichBingo UK Directory (at www.whichbingo.co.uk/online-bingo-directory/) as it lists every single UK online bingo game, and adds new ones as soon as they are launched. It's 100% comprehensive. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Leeds LS17 (talkcontribs) 11:25, 5 October 2008 (UTC)

We aren't a shopping guide, nor do we link to shopping guides, especially one that lists a bunch of skins. 2005 (talk) 21:24, 5 October 2008 (UTC)

Bingo Statistics[edit]

In response to your request for online bingo statistics in the UK, here is a press release that was issued recently.

UK Online Bingo authority website BingoPort.co.uk reported today that players at bingo sites operating in the United Kingdom are spending well over £600 million (USD $1.2 billion) per year on bingo tickets.

The data also shows that Sun Bingo maintains its position as the number one online bingo site in the UK, with 19% market share based on the value of bingo tickets sold and prizes distributed back to their players.

“We’ve seen unprecedented growth in the online bingo industry here in the UK in the past year,” said BingoPort.co.uk Managing Director and co-founder, Scott Logan. “The fact that online bingo players are purchasing bingo tickets in the realm of £600 million annually is truly amazing considering the credit crunch, but not surprising considering the licensing of the online gaming industry in the UK.”

The figures take into account collation of gameplay data gathered from BingoPort.co.uk’s bingo site monitoring services which tracks all of the major online bingo operators in the United Kingdom, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

“This is the most accurate estimate to date of the size of the online bingo industry in this country,” said Logan. “As the only company so comprehensively monitoring this data, we are able to gain a unique insight into the industry that isn’t possible otherwise, especially since most online bingo operators are not public companies and are reluctant to release information about their turnover.”

As well as industry size data, BingoPort.co.uk also released details of the market size of the industry leaders based on the value of bingo tickets and game prizes. It is estimated that the number one UK online bingo site, with 19% of the turnover market, is Sun Bingo. This is followed by Gala Bingo (16%), Foxy Bingo (13%), Jackpot Joy (10%) and Mecca Bingo (7%).

When asked about the market share data, Logan said “it’s significant that there is no stand-out leader when it comes to market share. While Sun Bingo maintains the overall lead, we see market share change on a daily basis based on specific promotions run by each operator.”

Logan went on to note that the number and variety of promotions run by operators has increased dramatically over the past year as the online bingo clubs struggle to gain and maintain market share. “There is no doubt that the leaders, such as Sun Bingo and Gala Bingo, have gained much of their market share on the back of their strong brand names. However, it is their ongoing jackpots and promotions that keep players coming back and help them maintain their positions.”

As the largest online bingo community in the UK, BingoPort.co.uk is the only website to monitor the online bingo operators in real-time for player numbers, jackpots and promotions. Site visitors participate in a range of community features on the site such as bingo chat forums, free bingo and exclusive site events. BingoPort.co.uk also provides industry related services including competitor analysis, business planning and consultation.

—Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.94.189.155 (talk) 01:51, 24 October 2008 (UTC) 


Sorry. I see that this information has already been cited in the article. 203.94.189.155 (talk) 03:35, 24 October 2008 (UTC)

Bingo Hideout has recently release comprehensive survey results that provide a lot of detail about online bingo players. We are sure this would be a useful addtion to the external links section. This data could also be referenced in the main body of this content.

DMOZ External link[edit]

Why is there a need for external links? Nobody who has found this page could conceivably have any difficulty finding an online bingo site, which are heavily advertised and easy to find. Linking to the worst list of bingo sites I've ever seen serves no useful purpose, and the fact that the half-assed selection is ostensibly non-commercial does not realy make it any better than any other random list you could choose - the only effect is indirect preferment of the sites listed on the ODP. Sumbuddi (talk) 14:19, 9 February 2010 (UTC)

Because the WP:EL guideline states external links can be useful to readers, and provides clear, direct, by name guidance that a Dmoz link is a good choice for a directory link. This is a topic where there are hundreds of websites and articles on the topic, so a directory link is appropriate. This Dmoz category has 20 sites linked, which is plenty to find more information. You have now been reverted by three editors who say the link is appropriate, and have been pointed to the WP:EL that also states explicitly Dmoz can be linked. Move on. There must be something you can do more productively. (Added... and to state the obvious, the "no more links" guidance only makes sense with a link already there. These articles hardly ever get spammed because of the no more links/dmoz combo.) 2005 (talk) 00:20, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
Information? Could you point to any one of those dmoz links that you feel adds 'information' about online bingo, that could not be better obtained by simply typing 'online bingo' into a search engine? For instance, does the dmoz link list major online bingo sites - answer: no, it links to a tiny number, omitting most major sites. Does it link to some academic study or other valuable guide to bingo? Again no.
If you seriously think there is useful information linked at dmoz, identify it, and it can be added as a source here. But let's not link to things for the sake of it.
And btw, it's nonsense to suggest that you can't say 'NO LINKS TO BINGO SITES/AFFILIATES'. It is NOT necessary to link to the ODP to include such a text. Clearly links to bingo sites are not useful, and we do not need a randomly partial link to a hopelessly incomplete, and never-will-be-complete before the heat death of the universe, site maintained by a faceless, unidentified, basically unaccoutable third party to prove that.Sumbuddi (talk) 00:32, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
Once again, this is not the place to talk about your dislike of Dmoz and how it is crap. That is a for the broader external links guideline, which as you should know by now says such links are acceptable to add. Second, Wikipedia is not a search engine. People can find information about anything via a search engine, but yet we still have Wikipedia articles. Third, as for your other comment, seriously, there are links to bingo software companies, free play sites, and review sites. They offer plenty of information, like promoting their own software or opinions, that we wouldn't include in an article, but provide detail to users. As for dmoz omitting some sites, who cares? That isn't our business. They have some sites. The concept of external links is "further reading", not "all possible further reading". The fact Dmoz isn't complete is irrelevant. If there was only two or three sites in the category, then a case could be made, but 20+5 is a lot of further reading. There isn't the slightest harm in having the link, but that again is discussion for the external links guideline since clearly non-completedness is of no concern because the guideline reflects the widespread consensus that a Dmoz link is okay to add. 2005 (talk) 00:45, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
You put this very well, here: [1] "A Dmoz link should be a last resort, not a first, and it shouldn't be used if the category is pathetic, which they sometimes are." In this case, the category is pathetic, and I agree with your conclusions derived from this, viz. that the category should not be used.
If you want to include it, you must contend that the category is not pathetic. On what basis? Half-a-dozen bingo sites (out of hundreds,[2] omitting major sites), a randomly selected software provider, and a selection of links to banner farms is nothing if not pathetic.
I'm not sure what you are saying about 'further reading'. The link is directly to a list of bingo sites - places to gamble, not read. I don't have a particular issue with that, but the list should be something above pathetic, otherwise it contributes NOTHING.
And as for reading, there is no point in linking to random crap. Again, if there is useful content there, identify it.
And no, this is not a WP:EL discussion: as you correctly say, it is 'ok' to add ODP links, but equally they are NOT compulsory. It seems to me that you are the one who should take this to WP:EL, because you seem want to make the link COMPULSORY, despite the content being hopeless. Sumbuddi (talk) 01:01, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
Please at least look at the category before commenting further. WhichBingo, DotBingo, Bingo-Reviwer, etc, are information sites, not gambling sites. And obviously the five free play sites are not gambling sites. There is a mix of gambling sites and non gambling sites. So your assertion is plainly false. You are also wildly mistaken regarding the casino city link. Almost all of those are just doorways, skins, not actual bingo gambling sites. There are actually very few of those. Bingo Entertainment for example owns many sites/skins/doorways. The type of directory you seek would link to dozens of these duplicate skins where the person eventually just plays at the same site owned by the parent company. As for quoting me about Dmoz, I'm glad you say you agree, now you just need to act accordingly. The category is not "pathetic", that's just silly. And more to the point, three editors now have re-added the link because they see it as valuable. You have your opinion, they have theirs. Please respect the opinion of other editors. They don't agree with you that the link is pathetic, so it can stay, as the guideline states. Likewise, most of the other Dmoz gambling links are good additions, for example most obviously Poker, Blackjack and Slots. So to be clear, the links are not compulsory, and I didn't even remotely imply that, but they are allowed, and three editors (four including a different article) now have told you they think the links are fine. You do not get to nullify their opinions. 2005 (talk) 01:51, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
Wildly mistaken? Have you been through the whole list? If you take for instance Playtech Bingo aka Bingoland, they run Ruby Bingo, Betfred, Bingo Day, Bingo 770, Bingo Fantasy, Mapau Bingo, Totesport, Bingo Kid, Bingo Mexicano, possibly inter alia. They are unique sites with separate owners (albeit running on the same network), claim £1m of prizes last month, and not one is listed at the ODP. These are huge brands - Totesport, William Hill (Ruby Bingo) and Betfred are each billion pound brands, and not one single one of the Bingoland sites is listed.
That the listing is pathetic is without question.
As for the 'information sites', a slightly less pathetic listing - the problem is that they are all banner farms. If you look at blackjack and poker, you can find many sites that contain useful information, analysis, and so on. There is nothing like that for bingo. It's advertising, pure and simple, and there's no reason to link to it.Sumbuddi (talk) 03:29, 10 February 2010 (UTC)

Sumbuddi you really need to take your criticisms of DMOZ to the talk page on WP:EL. Hazir (talk) 13:28, 10 February 2010 (UTC)

I don't have any criticisms of DMOZ. I couldn't care less about DMOZ. I'm sure DMOZ have many admirable categories - http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Visual_Arts/ASCII_Art/Software/ for example, looks like a pretty good category, and a good link for the relevant Wikipedia page.
What I do have is a criticism of this specific category. I couldn't care less about DMOZ in general, only that this category sucks. Please let that be clear, as I have explained this several times already.
This specific category adds nothing - just an apparently arbitrary set of links that is less useful than a link to lmgtfy.com. Please do not pervert the discussion about the merits of this specific category into a general discussion about DMOZ in the abstract. Sumbuddi (talk) 14:29, 10 February 2010 (UTC)
I had a closer look at DMOZ today. I can't say much for Bingo as it's not an area of interest but I have to say the [Sports Gambling] category is a disgrace. It appears that DMOZ has gone downhill in the past few years. Nonetheless, I still think this matter should be addressed at WP:EL where it would get some proper discussion and attention. Hazir (talk) 18:41, 11 February 2010 (UTC)
As a side point, please stop reverting other editors without consensus. This is poor form and I see that you've been [blocked] recently. There's no reason why this can't be worked out civilly. Hazir (talk) 18:45, 11 February 2010 (UTC)

Clean Up[edit]

This article is brutally biased and is bordering on free advertisement, it needs to be cleaned up Asap. --Eidetic Man (talk) 00:04, 18 February 2011 (UTC)

Unsourced - moving here per PRESERVE[edit]

This is all unsourced - moving here per WP:PRESERVE - the burden is on anyone restoring this to provide reliable sources.

Main types of bingo games

There are four main types of bingo played around the world. In live North American bingo halls, they typically play the 75-ball version of bingo on a 5x5 card with the center square usually marked 'free'. The letters B-I-N-G-O typically sit atop the 75 ball bingo card and they correspond with each of the five columns found on the bingo card.

The desired pattern which players aim to achieve in 75 ball can vary dramatically, from a simple single line to more complicated themed patterns. The aim of the game, however, is always the same: to mark off the numbers to achieve the desired pattern. Speed Bingo is a variation played exactly the same, but numbers are simply called much quicker.

In the UK, parts of Europe, Australia and parts of South America they play a 90-ball game, marked on a 9x3 card. Both types of bingo are prominent online. In 90-ball bingo, each card has three horizontal lines and nine columns. Each line contains five numbers, meaning each card has 15 numbers. The first column contains numbers from 1-9, the second column contains numbers from 10-19, the third column contains numbers from 20-29, all the way through to the final column which contains numbers from 80-90.

A game of 90 ball bingo will normally be played in three stages: one line, two lines and full house. In a "one line" game players need to mark a complete horizontal line across one card (i.e., 5 numbers marked). The aim of a 'two lines' game is to complete any two marked lines horizontally across one card (i.e., 10 numbers marked). Finally a “full house” means all the numbers marked off on one card (all 15 numbers), as in a regular coverall game. The prize split differs for each stage of the game. The prize will be shared equally among the winners if there is more than one. The full house is always the largest prize in any one game.

A third type of bingo game is a rather quick game of bingo. It is played with 30 balls, numbered one through thirty and appropriately known as 30 ball bingo or speed bingo. The 30 ball bingo game utilizes a 3 × 3 card and the object of the game is to be the first bingo player to "fill" his or her card, which requires all nine numbers on your card to match the numbers that have been called out.

The fourth main type of bingo game is 80 ball bingo, which is a hybrid between the 75 ball bingo rules and 90 ball bingo rules. The bingo cards are 4x4, thus they contain 16 numbers. Prizes are awarded in 80 ball bingo vary, depending on the game played. Some of the ways to win 80 ball bingo include being the first player to complete an entire line on their bingo card. The "line" can be horizontal, diagonal, or vertical. Getting "four corners" also constitutes a win in some 80 ball bingo games, whilst other games require multiple lines (1 or two lines), and still others require a full house.

Facebook Bingo

Bingo on Facebook differs from traditional online or land based bingo games. Most games feature 'power-ups' which give individual players an advantage on winning the game when using such power-ups. Players can also collect, buy and share virtual items with friends on the Facebook platform.

Getting started

Some operators require players to download free software to play their games. Other operators use JavaScript or Adobe Flash based games that allow you to play immediately online after registering a player account.

Most sites accept a standard range of credit card and e-wallet funding options. Sites often provide a number of incentives to deposit, including matching bonuses where the site will reward depositing players by matching a percentage of their deposit.

In 2006, the US government passed UIGEA Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 which stopped banks' ability to process credit cards for US citizens. The laws prevent US based payment providers from taking payments for online gaming.

Chat

Whereas in land-based bingo talking is strictly forbidden during a game, it is actively encouraged in online bingo. Chat functions as an effective retention tool, aimed especially at the predominantly female audience.

It is customary for players to congratulate winning players with comments like "WTG," or "Way To Go". Much like instant messaging, online bingo chat communities have their own acronyms which are often used in place of often repeated sentences.

CM stands for "chat monitor". (This can also stand for chat moderator; in some other sites you may have "CH" which stands for chat host.) The CM works for the bingo site as the host of a chat room and plays a role in welcoming players and creating a friendly and communal atmosphere in the room. This includes, but is not limited to, congratulating players when they win a game as well as playing chat games in-between bingo. Most sites have a chat protocol known as chat etiquette or chatiquette.


Bingo networks

There are a number of sites that will have the same promotions, similar graphics, the same bingo rooms and the same CMs. This occurs because they are part of a bingo "network". In simple terms, this means a number of different sites (or "front ends") are playing with the same numbers for the same jackpot (i.e., the same back end). Multiple sites act as doorways to a single game, leading to larger pools of players in chat rooms and more sizable pots to win, in an arrangement known as White Label Gaming. While the bingo software is the same, the brand owners are responsible for the look and feel of the site, together with any promotions they wish to offer. This is an important feature of online bingo in that it is critical that any site have enough players to have a decent sized game. Hence, the bingo network "shares" players. Some operators choose not to pool their players together and because they segregate their players, they operate on a stand-alone network, which again can be via "white label" (Brigend Limited is the most commonly used stand-alone white label software) or can be done through the use of proprietary software.

Mobile Bingo

Gambling on mobile devices has seen rapid growth during 2011-13. Rank Group, the company behind Mecca Bingo has seen strong growth in mobile revenues with mobile accounting for 6% of their interactive divisional revenues in 2011. Mobile bingo products have been cited as particularly difficult to produce due to the difficulty of integrating social and chat functions which are seen as important to the gaming experience.

TV Advertising

Advertising of online bingo on TV has grown massively with marketing budgets of major brands investing time, money and effort to ensure the public are aware of their brands.

-- Jytdog (talk) 20:46, 20 September 2016 (UTC)