Talk:.70-150 Winchester

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The 70-150 Win – “A Real Paradox”[edit]

There are really paradoxical “hypothetical” contradictions in this article: “Appearing” but produced – “never”. Produced “never” – but may have been a “display”. A “manufacturer” – but never “produced”. “Hypothetical – American” (like “Jewish – Physics”).

In books written by George Madis (affectionately known as Mr. Winchester”), three (3) rifles were known to exist, two (2) in a European-Atlantic island and one in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Its rifling was described as a special ratcheted type only near the muzzle end (1982 handbook page 99 model 1887 section).

In Sam Fadala’s complete black powder handbook – 5th Edition chapter 41 page 355 (books google isbn 144022711X) describes the rare 70-150 of high value to collectors as “experimental”. Madis also mentions Winchester’s experimental ballistics development laboratory (georgemadis dot com).

Frank C. Barnes’ cartridges of the world a complete illustrated reference for more than 1,500 cartridges (google books isbn 1440230595) page 108 identifies the 70-150 as "scarce".

Suggest deleting the word ‘hypothetical’ and inserting the words ‘rare’ or ‘experimental’. 144.183.224.2 (talk) 17:56, 11 February 2013 (UTC)

That's easily fixable. It does need the title of Madis' book, with publisher, place & date, as well as publisher, place & date of Fadala's book. TREKphiler any time you're ready, Uhura 00:47, 12 February 2013 (UTC)