Talk:154 (album)

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Re-issue(s)[edit]

Article says Restless re-issued 154 on CD in 1993. It was definitely re-issued before that, but I don't have an exact date, myself. (FWIW, by late 1992 many of the Restless re-issues, including this album, were already in the cut-out bins.) -- Gyrofrog (talk) 06:58, 15 August 2005 (UTC)

More info: the Restless CD re-issue came in a long box (Remember those? I saved part of the text from it), which would most likely put the (initial) re-issue no later than 1992. My copy (as well as that of Chairs Missing) has an additional copyright date of 1989, by EMI, suggesting that someone (if not Restless) had re-issued the album in that year. Finally, I think Mute Records may have actually been the ones who re-issued it, while Restless/Enigma licensed the rights to the Wire albums in the U.S.A. I don't have a specific reference for these, other than the copyright date, but I will at least go ahead and modify the re-issue date in the article. -- Gyrofrog (talk) 16:08, 7 December 2005 (UTC)

"Lasting influence"[edit]

The article's a bit too fanzine-ish. I hardly think the transition completed by "154" is in any way responsible for Wire's "lasting influence." The first two albums are both stronger than "154", and the ripples created by them -- and "Pink Flag" especially -- are the real reason we still talk about and listen to Wire. Cloonmore 03:02, 3 September 2007 (UTC)

But aren't you basically expressing pure personal opinion here? By that I mean that you are letting your personal feelings about the album's quality effect your judgement of whether or not the album is important. And it certainly was, in that few other major "punk" bands had delved as deeply into studio experimentation and the deconstruction of song structure. Naturally, their first two albums had both to varying degrees, but 154 took what was introduced on songs like "Marooned" and "Strange" from the first two albums and pushed it to the absolute limit. Seriously, who, since The Velvet Underground, outside of avant-garde classical music, had used the electric viola in such a way as Wire do on "A Touching Display" (excluding Throbbing Gristle, but that was a violin)? Eh, well....71.230.163.43 (talk) 23:51, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

Dead link[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 16:31, 1 June 2011 (UTC)

Dead link 2[edit]

During several automated bot runs the following external link was found to be unavailable. Please check if the link is in fact down and fix or remove it in that case!

--JeffGBot (talk) 05:23, 20 June 2011 (UTC)