Talk:1944 Great Atlantic hurricane

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Size[edit]

And producing hurricane force winds over a diameter of 600 miles.

That's got to be a typo. That would make it, by far, the largest hurricane ever to torment the seas, and I know it wasn't. Katrina's were only out to 100 miles, and it was incredibly large. bob rulz 06:34, 3 December 2005 (UTC)

Indeed, that has to be wrong. Note that Katrina's hurricane-force winds at one point extended out 125 miles however [1]. I've seen some other storms with large (but believable) claims: see Hurricane Fran and Hurricane Isabel. Unforunately Typhoon Tip doesn't have any info on how far hurricane-force winds extended. Jdorje 07:10, 3 December 2005 (UTC)
[2] provides some interesting reading. Jdorje 07:16, 3 December 2005 (UTC)
That would make this hurricane half as extensive as Tip (note the difference between 600 mile diameter versus 675 mile radius), which appears reasonable. Katrina was slightly larger than average for a hurricane. I don't see a problem with this hurricane-force wind measurement; they recognized in real-time that this was a very large hurricane, hence their naming the system The Great Atlantic Hurricane. The term "Great" was used (into the 1970's, I believe) for tropical cyclones that either had extensive areas of hurricane force winds, or intense hurricanes. This cyclone had both qualities. By the way, this appears to be the earliest known named storm by the office that evolved into the National Hurricane Center. Were there any older named tropical cyclones by this office? Thegreatdr 17:43, 20 August 2006 (UTC)

Todo[edit]

The lack of any sources prevents this from being B-Class. Jdorje 05:56, 15 January 2006 (UTC)

damage[edit]

Isn't $1000 million (USD 2007) one billion? Juliancolton 18:55, 14 November 2007 (UTC)

Fixed it. --Hurricanehink (talk) 18:59, 14 November 2007 (UTC)