Talk:24 (TV series)

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Good article 24 (TV series) has been listed as one of the Media and drama good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
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WikiProject 24 (Rated GA-class)
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What is a good article?[edit]

A good article is—

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Main cast vs Recurring cast[edit]

What's the criteria for "main cast" and "Recurring cast" in the list of characters?

For example, Sherry Palmer is "Recurring cast" for 1 despite being in 22 episodes, while Sarah Gavin is put as "main cast" for series 4 when she was in only 12. Also Edgar Stiles is "Recurring cast" for series 4 despite being in all, but "main cast" for 5 where he's in only 13.

basically - there doesn't seem to be any consistent line in the list. 188.221.79.22 (talk) 15:55, 20 May 2013 (UTC)

This is something that requires clarification, but I believe most of the examples given above depend on their billing in credits. I'll check that, however.  drewmunn  talk  16:03, 20 May 2013 (UTC)
It's quite simple: it's how the actors are billed. If they're credited as starring, they're main cast, if they're credited as guest stars or special guest stars, they're recurring. Yes, sometimes actors appeared in all episodes of a season, but are credited as guest stars. It's just how it is. We, as editors, can't change it based on what we think. The way it is right now is correct, everyone's in their proper place. Drovethrughosts (talk) 18:49, 20 May 2013 (UTC)
ah - right. thanks for the explanation. 188.221.79.22 (talk) 11:59, 21 May 2013 (UTC)

Not real time[edit]

The incorrect claim that the show uses "the real time method of narration" should be removed. There are constant 4.5 minute gaps. It is not real time. That marketing lie should be removed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 63.228.116.228 (talk) 07:37, 21 June 2013 (UTC)

I don't think you understand the format of the show. Episodes range from 41 minutes to 58 minutes in length, and each depicts 60 minutes of action. They all also take up 60 minutes of broadcast time during their original airing, and events are arranged chronologically and progress at a 1:1 time ratio. This makes it realtime. The gapes in the shorter episodes are for commercial breaks, but the action still occurs throughout the break (that's when the characters go to the toilet, eat food, and sleep), it is just not shown. On return from the break, the time elapsed in the 24 universe is equal to the time you have been watching commercials. If you watch the episodes on home media, or a syndicated channel, the ad-breaks are not present, or may not be the same length. However, the action depicted is still realtime, just with non-synchronous points.  drewmunn  talk  10:21, 21 June 2013 (UTC)

I just timed an episode from the second season, and it was 42:30 long. The clock in the show showed 60 minutes. The real-time claim is a bold-face lie. Why do you people defend Fox this way?

You should really look at the above message. There's an explanation there. Beerest355 Talk 02:43, 3 July 2013 (UTC)
Just watched the first two episodes and noticed that the clock is 1:44 when the Palmer brats show up. The next scene with Teri and Alan, it is 01:42. Going back in time is not real time by any definition. I don't understand the pro-Fox bias here on Wikipedia that supports this nonsense. I guess Jack Bauer and Fox have a time machine in order for this show to do this. Is that really what you're claiming Beerest355? Please get out of here with this sort of bias that is ruining Wikipedia. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.149.43.225 (talk) 07:05, 12 July 2013 (UTC)
I have watched episodes from the first season that I timed and the clock kept being off by as much as 50 seconds at a commercial break. The third season opener does not pause for commercials and yet is only forty-nine minutes. Despite these errors (or as I like to think of them: "poetic licenses") the show is still of a real time format: It does not have flashbacks that pause the present (Revolution (TV series)), it does not show "cool" action sequences in slow motion (any action movie), and its story is not shown out-of-order (Pulp Fiction). Most notably, it does not pause the story for commercial at a tense moment just to pick up a moment later (any other TV drama). Your push for an encyclopedia free from company bias is admirable, but is incorrect this time. ––Ɔ ☎ ℡ ☎ 03:44, 20 July 2013 (UTC)

Edit Request on July 29,2013[edit]

In the 'Impact and reception' section under 'Awards and nominations' shouldn't the fact that 24 was ranked #71 by the Writer's Guild of America in the 101 Best Written TV Shows of all-time be on there? Source: http://www.wga.org/content/default.aspx?id=4925 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.43.239.136 (talk) 06:51, 29 July 2013 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done, thanks. Drovethrughosts (talk) 12:25, 29 July 2013 (UTC)


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