Talk:9-1-1

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Former good article nominee 9-1-1 was a good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
December 3, 2008 Good article nominee Not listed
May 16, 2009 Good article nominee Not listed
March 21, 2013 Good article nominee Not listed
Current status: Former good article nominee

911 in the UK and Ireland[edit]

I've heard that this works in the UK and Ireland, due to the large number of kids who thought 911 was the emergancy number, not 999. Does anyone know this? I don't want to try it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 136.148.1.142 (talk) 15:06, 29 September 2005 (UTC)


--No 911 will NOT work in the UK. 999 will work as will EuroZone emergency 112. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Iamorgan (talkcontribs) 00:19, 16 April 2006 (UTC)

Yes, 911 does work in the UK. I just tried it, and got put through to the emergency services. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.128.95.94 (talk) 17:40, 20 October 2006 (UTC)

--As a general rule, 911 does NOT work in the U.K. It is certainly not programmed into any BT switches, and in fact in at least a couple of places now there can be regular local numbers which start 911. It's possible that a PBX has been programmed to translate 911 into 999/112 on an outside line, and it's just possible that one or more of the cable carriers might translate as well. But overall, 911 will NOT work.

PBC1966 (talk) 21:06, 13 May 2008 (UTC)

--Many worldwide systems are supporting 112, 911, 111, etc. and translating to the local emergency code, if the former numbers do not directly conflict with the numbering plan in use. Hcberkowitz 19:18, 20 March 2007 (UTC)

Dialing 911 on GSM mobile phones in Australia also puts you through to emergency services. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zohmohgoh (talkcontribs) 21:26, 31 August 2007 (UTC)

I have experience with this, but I would guess any telephone that can dial complete numbers could easily convert a number of common emergency numbers to the correct emergency number for the region. On an old-style landline, each button is communicated immediately to a nearby switching station, so you wouldn't want 9-1-1-*pause while looking at notes*-3-1-2 (a potentially valid local number in the UK) to end up dialing 999 by accident (although it's possible certain areas do this anyways). On something like a cell phone call though, the user explicitly presses the send button, so it's unlikely 9-1-1-*send* was anything but an emergency call. Phones sold in a particular region could easily be programmed to dial 999 when instructed to dial 911, 000, 111, etc., to aid foreigners who may have panicked in an emergency and forgotten the local number. Phones could also be programmed to dial a different emergency number by detecting what region they're in. But you're probably better off remembering the local number than relying on non-official gimmicks to work. 162.252.201.32 (talk) 09:24, 20 May 2015 (UTC)

"00" key[edit]

Why has no phone an "00" key? --84.61.31.108 10:31, 2 February 2006 (UTC)

Gee, I don't know. Why is the sky blue? —QuicksilverT @ 21:29, 27 January 2007 (UTC)
Why waste you your time on questions such as these? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 122.169.138.71 (talk) 10:12, 11 August 2008 (UTC)
Why WOULD a phone have a "00" key? 87.113.6.148 (talk) 09:09, 21 September 2013 (UTC)

The number 9 autocompletes (or used to) to 911?[edit]

Several years ago I made an accidental 9-1-1 call. What happened is that the number I was calling began with a 9 (983 is an exchange prefix in southwest Michigan where I lived at the time). After dialing the 9, I stopped, trying to remember the rest of the number, and after a few seconds, I was automatically connected to 9-1-1. Needless to say I was surprised. It was a regular land line and I believe the provider at the time was Ameritech (this would have been around 1999 or 2000).

Does anybody have any information on this? Is a single 9 still automatically interpreted as a 9-1-1 call after a certain period of time with no further digits dialed? Is, or was it a nationwide policy, or maybe just a local quirk? I haven't been able to find any information on this, but if anybody can dig up a couple links, I'd be happy to add the information to the article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.136.209.113 (talk) 01:02, 30 December 2007 (UTC)

Almost definitely a local quirk, either by accident or design. Or you dialed the 9, then accidentally flashed the hookswitch a couple of timesm which would be the equivalent of dialing 1-1. 46.208.153.121 (talk) 12:12, 29 May 2012 (UTC)
Not sure the odds the OP will come back 8 years later, but according to the page for 999, certain phone systems were specifically designed to auto-dial either 999 or an operator if only one or two 9's were pressed. It's possible someone did something similar in the U.S. with 911 calls. 162.252.201.32 (talk) 08:59, 20 May 2015 (UTC)

History[edit]

Is all the verbiage describing the early years of the phone and how people made calls really necessary? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 157.139.9.38 (talk) 19:34, 19 May 2009 (UTC)

I've removed the misleading claim that dial service was not widespread until the 1950's. Certainly many areas still had manual service at that time, but as that section read it was suggesting that dial service was not at all common either, which is simply not true. PBC1966 (talk) 08:49, 14 September 2013 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to one external link on 9-1-1. Please take a moment to review my edit. You may add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it, if I keep adding bad data, but formatting bugs should be reported instead. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether, but should be used as a last resort. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

YesY Archived sources have been checked to be working

Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 12:22, 29 March 2016 (UTC)

source(s)[edit]

Why the hyphens?[edit]

9-1-1 is not a number. 911 is. Can someone please explain if the hyphens get dialled (and how), and if not why is the code 9-1-1 indicated rather than the number 911? Compare with Wikipedia on the 999 emergency number. P0mbal (talk) 22:10, 27 September 2016 (UTC)