Talk:A Quick One, While He's Away

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WikiProject Rock music (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
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Untitled[edit]

Is there any evidence that the girl and Ivor are caught "in the act", as the article would have it? This doesn't seem to be supported the lyrics themselves. Is there an interview with Townshend or something that supports this?

I agree, the lyrics do not support that they were caught in "in the act" of anything, note the lyrics: "I missed you and I must admit, I kissed a few and once did sit, On Ivor the Engine Driver's lap, And later with him, had a nap". This shouldn't need to be explained as such if they were caught in the act. There does seem to be a lot of quoting throughout this entry, however no references that relate any interview to those quotes. I removed that reference from the entry. Also, formal names of the different sections of the song are noted as 'Her Man's Gone,' 'Crying Town,' 'We Have A Remedy,' 'Ivor The Engine Driver,' 'Soon Be Home,' and 'You Are Forgiven', this is listed on one of the references, these are seen on reference "1" in the article. Jokach 12:59, 20 November 2006 (UTC)

Townshend says they are caught in the act on "Live At Leeds".

"Ivor The Engine Driver"[edit]

Any documented connection to the (earlier) kids' TV show Ivor the Engine? --kingboyk 20:01, 26 January 2007 (UTC)

I would expect so, though I don't think anyone has specifically mentioned the connection in any writings. However, it seems extremely likely that Townshend got the idea for the name from the programme. It's the first thing I thought of when I heard the song. Gbrading (ταlκ) 13:53, 27 April 2008 (UTC)
But unfortunately it still counts as speculation. It's just as likely that they wanted a rhyme for 'driver' -- EdJogg (talk) 14:35, 2 September 2011 (UTC)

References to be used for the article by anyone[edit]

From the Who Tube, A Quick One.. --Leahtwosaints (talk) 03:21, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

Why I added citation needed for claim this is "one of the first progressive rock songs."[edit]

First of all just in general a claim like that should have a citation anyway because it is a fairly important assertion. But also when I think of progressive rock I think of bands like Yes, King Crimson, ELP with the defining features being things like mixing influences from Jazz and or Classical, complex harmonies or time signatures, and usually heavy use of synthesizers. None of that is evident in this song. Just stringing a bunch of songs together and calling it a mini opera doesn't qualify it as progressive rock in my opinion. Don't get me wrong, I like this song a lot, actually more than most progressive rock, I just don't think it is appropriately classified. Of course the proof is in the citations. --MadScientistX11 (talk) 21:40, 4 April 2015 (UTC)