Talk:Agitator

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Missing part(s)![edit]

A few weeks later, there was another meeting at while the army was camped at Thriplow Heath near Royston, the soldiers refused the offers made by Parliament, and the agitators demanded a march towards London and the "purging" of the House of Commons, which did not happen, the movement gradually disintegrating

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and there the article ends! Something is clearly(?) missing here. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Olof nord (talkcontribs) 18:12, 17 November 2011 (UTC)

Agitators and Levellers[edit]

I believe this article as it stands is misleading in stating (twice) that the Agitators preceded the Levellers and were the source of their ideas. On the contrary, the Leveller movement (although not at first called by that name, which was coined by their opponents) with its petitions and pamphlets predates the election of the Agitators; indeed that remarkable experiment in Army democracy was largely inspired by Leveller ideas. Perhaps it would be better to describe Levellers and Agitators as linked radical elements in the revolutionary ferment of the 1640s. PhilG (talk) 13:19, 20 March 2017 (UTC)