Talk:Alexander Alekhine

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Good article Alexander Alekhine has been listed as one of the Sports and recreation good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
August 22, 2007 WikiProject A-class review Not approved
May 28, 2008 Good article nominee Listed
Current status: Good article

English version of the name[edit]

Can anyone explain why the English spelling of his name has an "e" at the end? It doesn't match the Russian spelling, and it gives no positive phoenetic hints either, in fact it actually makes English speakers pronounce it horribly wrong, by sounding it out as "a-leh-eye-n" instead of the correct pronounciation "a-leh-in"

I am not contesting the veracity of the English version, I know it is everywhere, I am just curious why it is so uselessly wrong.

72.245.213.213 (talk) 14:27, 26 August 2011 (UTC)

Actually, the Russian pronunciation indicated in the article is wrong too. It's pronounced Al-YOKH-in.--108.36.159.94 (talk) 06:14, 21 December 2015 (UTC)
Alekhine himself pronounced it Alyekhin, not Alyokhin. The Russian "e" letter often causes confusion, if it's written as "ë" then it's definitely pronounced "yo", but sometimes the two dots are omitted in which case it could be either "ye" or "yo". This is how the spelling "Gorbachev" rather than "Gorbachyov" became established in English. MaxBrowne (talk) 06:23, 21 December 2015 (UTC)
I've always assumed it was the French romanisation, which was imported into the anglosphere. That explains why we had Feodor Chaliapine (nowadays it's usually Chaliapin) rather than Shalyapin, Léonide Massine rather than Leonid Myasin, and others. Without the -e, the French would be tempted to incorrectly nasalise the -in ending. -- Jack of Oz [your turn] 06:13, 3 September 2011 (UTC)
The English version is Alexander Alekhin; Alexandre Alekhine is the French spelling. --Chvsanchez (talk) 23:54, 6 March 2013 (UTC)

Antisemitism?[edit]

The rather long and speculative bit on antisemitism is inappropriate for the Alekhine page. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.23.192.9 (talk) 08:24, 10 October 2013 (UTC)

The article section that you referenced is supported by multiple references, so it is definitely not "speculative". Which of its claims do you consider dubious, and why? Toccata quarta (talk) 08:52, 10 October 2013 (UTC)


On Jan 1,2017 we will know, maybe. I have always heard - for decades - that Alekhine was anti-Semitic - but I didn't know it was on such flimsy evidence. 2601:181:8000:D6D0:E019:7E58:DF3E:731 (talk) 23:44, 29 March 2016 (UTC)

Olympic Medals[edit]

From 1930 to 1935, Alekhine played first board for France at four Chess Olympiads, winning [...] gold medals for board one at Prague in 1931 and Folkestone in 1933, and the silver medal for board one at Warsaw in 1935.

Is that true? Were individual medals donated before WW II? I have never seen contemporary sources confirming that. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 37.138.43.139 (talk) 13:49, 13 March 2015 (UTC)

Yes, it's true. It's referenced in the article and I think I can also find it in the FIDE book. Quale (talk) 04:21, 15 March 2015 (UTC)
No, it´s not true. The references do not mention any "gold medals" oder "silver medals" for best board results. It´s a misinterpretation. No serious Alekhine bio mentions these alleged medals. Where are they now? Disappeared into thin air? They are just fantasy. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 37.138.45.133 (talk) 23:33, 16 March 2015 (UTC)
Aside from Olimpbase, the best source I have for the Olympiads through 1968 is Chess Olympiads, 1927–1968 by Árpád Földeák (1979 Dover edition, reprinted from a 1969 English translation of the Hungarian original). Concerning Hamburg 1930, it says on page 47 "Rubinstein, Havasi, and Flohr won the prizes for the best individual scores." Page 141, concerning Stockholm 1937, says "The prizes for the best score on each board went to Flohr, Fine, Kashdan, Danielsson, and Horowitz, while A. Steiner was awarded the prize for the highest individual score overall." That suggests to me that individual prizes were awarded at early Olympiads. On the other hand, while the book notes the top individual score on first board for Alekhine at Folkstone 1933, it doesn't say that he was awarded a prize. Unfortunately that isn't conclusive one way or the other. Maybe some other chess editor knows more about this. Quale (talk) 02:12, 17 March 2015 (UTC)

proposal about alekhine-capablanca rematch controversy[edit]

There is a widely debated topic on chess history, it is not clear whether it is based on facts or rumours/speculations. the topic is: "Alekhine-Capablanca world championship rematch." Some believe Alekhine avoided Capablanca and some believe contrary, ALekhine gave him a chance but Capa did not use it. can wikipedia enlighten all of us on this matter? p.s: I am not good at wikipedia, I cant add references and e.t.c. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Sir artur (talkcontribs) 15:01, 4 February 2016 (UTC)

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Loss of the World title (1935–37)[edit]

I find the first sentence of this section dubious: why would Alekhine, as the World Champion, challenge Euwe? It's much more natural that the reverse occurred, and Euwe challenged Alekhine. Can anyone verify or source the statement? If it's indeed the case that Alekhine challenged Euwe, an explanation for Alekhine's weird behaviour would be great. Banedon (talk) 09:43, 20 July 2016 (UTC)

A Chessbase article does say that it was Alekhine who challenged Euwe, having issued it in 1933. My understanding was that Alekhine was picking his challengers. Jkmaskell (talk) 10:32, 20 July 2016 (UTC)
Do you have a link to the article? Banedon (talk) 14:57, 20 July 2016 (UTC)
It was "Alekhine-Euwe 1935: powerful images" by Albert Silver, 2013. The problem is that I have seen a quote elsewhere saying it was the other way round (Google Books, cant remember which one). There was a mention that Purdy wrote tournament books for the two Euwe matches so they seem a very good place to look on this question, maybe even Fine, which is mentioned as a source in that bit of the Wiki. The timeline seems odd in that Euwe accepted the challenge in 1933 but didn't play the match until after Alekhine faced Bogoljubow. I have no answers, just thinking out loud. Jkmaskell (talk) 21:42, 20 July 2016 (UTC)