Talk:Alice Walton

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Biography assessment rating comment[edit]

The article may be improved by following the WikiProject Biography 11 easy steps to producing at least a B article. -- KGV (Talk) 09:01, 4 June 2007 (UTC)

character[edit]

This article makes the person sound like a bitch, especially with her ultra conservative politics and killing a woman.

Is there not some better things to write about her?

The frankness about the crimes is a good thing, but I wonder why she drinks so much? 71.237.232.90 (talk) 01:23, 5 August 2012 (UTC)

Sources?[edit]

Where are the sources on the crimes she has been convicted of? 68.119.81.55 09:42, 25 October 2006 (UTC)

Right here: http://www.forbesautos.com/advice/toptens/billionaire/09-alice_walton.html

--Gloriamarie 05:53, 12 November 2006 (UTC)

Philanthropy[edit]

The philanthropy section doesn't have a single source cited. -Xcuref1endx (talk) 20:51, 21 October 2014 (UTC)

Eh? But I just got another email from her saying how she wants to share her money with me! She included her Wikipedia link, so it must be my lucky day! Actually, it's just more abuse of Wikipedia and Wikipedia don't care. There should be some way to add a temporary warning to the abused Wikipedia articles--especially before the spammers get smart enough to vandalize the articles to support their scams more closely. Shanen (talk) 09:09, 24 January 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Alice Walton Tulsa anecdote[edit]

The following has elements of OR & can't go into the bio as is. Nevertheless, it's fun & interesting, and almost certainly true in its essentials:

Tulsa is rich in Walmart stores, and the pastor of a church my long-term Tulsa sister used to belong to noticed a long vacant one on East 71st St, on the way west to the Arkansas River. On a hunch, he called Walmart in Bentonville to inquire about converting the store to a church & community center.

Tulsa World story: Open Bible Fellowship Moves Into Former Wal-Mart Store, February 25, 1998. I happened to drive by the church, on my way to the River Park in Feb 2017, and asked my sister about it.

A woman with a deep-country Arkie accent answered, and the pastor asked about the vacant store. "Well, how much can you afford to pay" he was asked. He replied that he'd hoped the company would donate the old store. "Can't do it. Shareholders." he was told, but the woman did some calculations. "We could sell it for $2.5 million," she said, adding that that was about the value of the underlying land. Pastor Joel Budd talked to his congregation and then to bankers, who agreed to a loan, and Walmart agreed to sell for $2.3 million.. The store was remodelled, and attracts up to 1,000 worshippers on busy Sundays. Pastor Budd noted that there's always plenty of free parking.

Budd later found out that the woman who'd answered the phone, figured a price and sold him the old store was Alice Walton, by far the wealthiest woman in America. He's been dining out on the story ever since. Pete Tillman (talk) 20:37, 22 February 2017 (UTC)

Undue weight to drunk driving in lede?[edit]

While this is a well-documented personal problem & failing, I question whether it should occupy 1/3 of the lede of our wikibio. For instance, no lede mention of her extensive Art collection. --Pete Tillman (talk) 20:45, 22 February 2017 (UTC)

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Request: Early life and education[edit]

Hi! I am working to update this page throughout and I noticed the formatting differs from other biography articles I have seen on Wikipedia. For instance, this article would better conform with other Wikipedia biographies if Education and career was separated into different sections. To that end I have created a proposed Early life and education section.

Early life and education
Early life and education

Walton was born in Newport, Arkansas.[1] She graduated from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, with a B.A. in economics and finance in 1971.[2]

Markup

==Early life and education==
Walton was born in [[Newport, Arkansas]].<ref name="Tedlow" /> She graduated from [[Trinity University (Texas)|Trinity University]] in [[San Antonio]], Texas, with a B.A. in economics and finance in 1971.<ref name="OConnor2013">{{cite news |last= O'Connor |first= Clair |url= http://www.forbes.com/sites/clareoconnor/2013/09/16/inside-the-world-of-walmart-billionaire-alice-walton-americas-richest-art-collector/ |title= Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector |work= Forbes |date= October 7, 2013}}</ref>

My hope is that an editor can create this new section, remove these details from the existing Education and career section and rename the existing section Career.

Are there editors who can assist with this? I will not direct edit this page because I have a Wikipedia:Conflict of interest; I work with the Walton family office, as I disclosed on my user page and declared above. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 15:24, 7 July 2017 (UTC)

Hi Kt2011. Thanks for providing a citation for Alice Walton's educational background—I will add that to the article. But as for the remainder of your request, why should it be approved? I'm not convinced that the entirety of the "Education and career" section should be removed. It should be edited to be a little less laudatory, while still giving credit where credit is due. Some more citations for the unsourced paragraphs would be helpful also. But I don't think it's necessary to throw out the entire section. Altamel (talk) 22:47, 7 July 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Tedlow was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ O'Connor, Clair (October 7, 2013). "Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector". Forbes. 
Hi, Altamel! I apologize for any confusion. To be clear: I do not recommend deleting the career material from the article. Rather, I ask that the two sentences mentioned in my request above be broken off into their own section titled Early life and education. Then we can rename the section currently called Education and career to simply Career. Is that agreeable? Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 21:38, 10 July 2017 (UTC)
Hmm. In that case, my question is, why? Stylistically, I'm not a fan of level 2 sections that only have two sentences—paragraphs flow better. But perhaps you have some compelling reason for doing so? Altamel (talk) 18:38, 15 July 2017 (UTC)
Altamel, Here's where I am coming from with this request: After reviewing other biographies on Wikipedia, it appeared to me that many of them contained Early life and education sections with details on birthplace, schooling, etc. Certainly this section would be short, but perhaps it could be further developed later. Also, it struck me as odd that the article would include Ms. Walton's birthplace under Education and career, as one's birth is not connected to one's education nor their career. Thanks for considering, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 18:16, 17 July 2017 (UTC)
Fair enough,  Done Altamel (talk) 03:42, 20 July 2017 (UTC)
Altamel, thank you for making these edits. Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 18:29, 20 July 2017 (UTC)

Request: Career[edit]

Hi! Continuing my work to update this article, I noticed Career needed attention. Most of Career is unsourced. Additionally, it is outdated. For example, Ms. Walton listed Rocking W Ranch for sale in 2015 and moved to Fort Worth, Texas, to focus on the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. I created a proposed Career section that tidies up the existing content, sources everything and adds a few extra details.

Career
Career

In her early career, Walton was an equity analyst and money manager for First Commerce Corporation[1] and headed investment activities at Arvest Bank Group.[2] She was also a broker for E.F. Hutton.[3] In 1988, Walton founded Llama Company, an investment bank, where she was president, chairwoman and CEO.[1][2]

Walton was the first person to chair the Northwest Arkansas Council and played a major role in the development of the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport, which opened in 1998.[4] At the time, the business and civic leaders of Northwest Arkansas Council found a need for the $109 million regional airport in their corner of the state.[5] Walton provided $15 million in initial funding for construction.[5] Her company, Llama Company, underwrote a $79.5 million bond.[5] The Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport Authority recognized Walton's contributions to the creation of the airport and named the terminal the Alice L. Walton Terminal Building.[6] She was inducted into the Arkansas Aviation Hall of Fame in 2001.[7]

In the late 1990s, Llama Co. closed and, in 1998, Walton moved to a ranch in Millsap, Texas, named Walton's Rocking W Ranch.[3][8][9] An avid horse-lover, she was known for having an eye for determining which 2-month-olds would grow to be champion cutters.[10] Walton listed the farm for sale in 2015 and moved to Fort Worth, Texas, citing the need to focus on the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Bentonville, Arkansas, art museum she founded that opened in 2011.[11][12][13]

In his 1992 autobiography Made in America, Sam Walton remarked that Alice was "the most like me—a maverick—but even more volatile than I am."[4]

Markup

==Career==
In her early career, Walton was an [[equity analyst]] and [[money manager]] for First Commerce Corporation<ref name="Hosticka 15">{{cite news |title=Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Alice walton |last1=Hosticka |first1=Alexis |url=https://www.nexis.com/docview/getDocForCuiReq?lni=5H1P-T3H1-JD2T-F10H&csi=280434&oc=00240&perma=true |newspaper=Arkansas Business |date=24 August 2015 |accessdate=8 May 2017}}</ref> and headed investment activities at Arvest Bank Group.<ref name="Gill 12">{{cite news |title=Alice Walton to receive honorary degree from the University of Arkansas |last1=Gill |first1=Todd |url=https://www.fayettevilleflyer.com/2012/02/16/alice-walton-to-receive-honorary-degree-from-the-university-of-arkansas/ |newspaper=Fayetteville Flyer |date=16 February 2012 |accessdate=8 May 2017}}</ref> She was also a broker for [[E.F. Hutton]].<ref name="OConnor2013"/> In 1988, Walton founded [[Llama Company]], an investment bank, where she was president, chairwoman and CEO.<ref name="Hosticka 15"/><ref name="Gill 12"/>

Walton was the first person to chair the [[Northwest Arkansas Council]] and played a major role in the development of the [[Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport]], which opened in 1998.<ref name="The New Yorker">{{cite news |title= Alice's Wonderland: A Walmart Heiress Builds a Museum in the Ozarks |last= Mead |first= Rebecca |work= The New Yorker |date= June 27, 2011}}</ref> At the time, the business and civic leaders of Northwest Arkansas Council found a need for the $109 million regional airport in their corner of the state.<ref name="AP May 1999">{{cite news |title=Group to consider naming airport terminal after Wal-Mart heiress |url=https://www.nexis.com/docview/getDocForCuiReq?lni=3X4J-M5X0-00HV-6105&csi=8399&oc=00240&perma=true |newspaper=[[The Associated Press]] |date=8 August 1999 |accessdate=8 May 2017}}</ref> Walton provided $15 million in initial funding for construction.<ref name="AP May 1999"/> Her company, Llama Company, underwrote a $79.5 million bond.<ref name="AP May 1999"/> The Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport Authority recognized Walton's contributions to the creation of the airport and named the terminal the Alice L. Walton Terminal Building.<ref name="AP August 1999">{{cite news |title=Airport board names terminal after Alice Walton |url=https://www.nexis.com/docview/getDocForCuiReq?lni=3X5H-T190-00HV-60MP&csi=8399&oc=00240&perma=true |newspaper=[[The Associated Press]] |date=13 August 1999 |accessdate=8 May 2017}}</ref> She was inducted into the Arkansas Aviation Hall of Fame in 2001.<ref name="Cottingham 10">{{cite news |title=Alice Walton: Working to bring the world to Arkansas' door |last1=Cottingham |first1=Jan |url=http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/article/37302/alice-walton-working-to-bring-the-world-to-arkansas-door?page=all |newspaper=[[Arkansas Business]] |date=29 March 2010 |accessdate=8 May 2017}}</ref>

In the late 1990s, Llama Co. closed and, in 1998, Walton moved to a ranch in [[Millsap, Texas]], named Walton's Rocking W Ranch.<ref name="OConnor2013"/><ref name="Paul 06">{{cite news |title=Alice Walton's big picture: The Wal-Mart heir turns her eye, and her money, to art collecting |last1=Paul |first1=Steve |url=https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/2006/12/10/alice-waltons-big-picture-span-classbankheadthe-wal-mart-heir-turns-her-eye-and-her-money-to-art-collectingspan/231bcb7a-a011-43d0-81a0-d7155997d1e6/?utm_term=.c0458f00fda6 |newspaper=[[The Washington Post]] |date=10 December 2006 |accessdate=9 May 2017}}</ref><ref name="AP December 1999">{{cite news |title=Wal-Mart heiress loves cutting horses |url=https://www.nexis.com/docview/getDocForCuiReq?lni=3Y4X-F4X0-009F-S3J1&csi=280434&oc=00240&perma=true |newspaper=[[The Associated Press]] |date=19 December 1999 |accessdate=9 May 2017}}</ref> An avid horse-lover, she was known for having an eye for determining which 2-month-olds would grow to be champion [[Cutting (sport)|cutters]].<ref name="Kansas City Star">{{cite news |title= Alice L. Walton, Making a Grand Dream a Reality: The Jet-Setter Is Parlaying Her Wealth into a Hometown Museum |last= Paul |first= Steven |work= [[The Kansas City Star]] |date= November 19, 2006}}</ref> Walton listed the farm for sale in 2015 and moved to [[Fort Worth, Texas]], citing the need to focus on the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Bentonville, Arkansas, art museum she founded that opened in 2011.<ref name="Baker 16">{{cite news |title=Alice Walton cuts prices on two ranch properties |last1=Baker |first1=Max B. |url=http://www.star-telegram.com/news/business/article87248437.html |newspaper=[[Star-Telegram]] |date=1 July 2016 |accessdate=9 May 2017}}</ref><ref name="Sherman 15">{{cite news |title=Wal-Mart heiress selling these 'iconic' ranches for $48 million |last1=Sherman |first1=Erik |url=http://fortune.com/2015/09/17/walmart-alice-walton-ranch/ |newspaper=[[Fortune (magazine)|Fortune]] |date=17 September 2015 |accessdate=9 May 2017}}</ref><ref name="NPR 11">{{cite news |title=Wal-Mart heiress brings art museum to the Ozarks |url=http://www.npr.org/2011/11/08/142019716/wal-mart-heiress-brings-art-museum-to-the-ozarks |newspaper=[[NPR]] |date=8 November 2011 |accessdate=9 May 2017}}</ref>

In his 1992 autobiography ''Made in America'', [[Sam Walton]] remarked that Alice was "the most like me—a maverick—but even more volatile than I am."<ref name="The New Yorker">{{cite news |title= Alice's Wonderland: A Walmart Heiress Builds a Museum in the Ozarks |last= Mead |first= Rebecca |work= The New Yorker |date= June 27, 2011}}</ref>

Are there editors who can assist with this? (Pinging Altamel, who responded to previous edit request). I will not direct edit this page because I have a Wikipedia:Conflict of interest; I work with the Walton family office, as I disclosed on my user page and declared above. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 19:03, 25 July 2017 (UTC)

 Done Hi Kt2011, I've just looked at your request and I've implemented your edits. However, I'd advise you to look at the wording of 'avid horse-lover' - I know this was already in the article, but could this be better phrased so that it sticks to NPOV? It reads as if it were an autobiography. st170e 23:53, 29 July 2017 (UTC)
Hi, st170e! Thank you for making these edits. I have marked the edit request as answered rather than declined, since everything I asked for has been done. As to your point about the phrase "avid horse-lover", this language was already in the article, so I left it in my draft. However, if it is problematic, or you think it is NPOV, I say we remove that phrase altogether. That way, the sentence can read: "She was known for having an eye for determining which 2-month-olds would grow to be champion cutters." If that sounds agreeable to you, would you mind making the edit? Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 14:26, 1 August 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ a b Hosticka, Alexis (24 August 2015). "Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Alice walton". Arkansas Business. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Gill, Todd (16 February 2012). "Alice Walton to receive honorary degree from the University of Arkansas". Fayetteville Flyer. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  3. ^ a b O'Connor, Clair (October 7, 2013). "Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector". Forbes. 
  4. ^ a b Mead, Rebecca (June 27, 2011). "Alice's Wonderland: A Walmart Heiress Builds a Museum in the Ozarks". The New Yorker. 
  5. ^ a b c "Group to consider naming airport terminal after Wal-Mart heiress". The Associated Press. 8 August 1999. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  6. ^ "Airport board names terminal after Alice Walton". The Associated Press. 13 August 1999. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  7. ^ Cottingham, Jan (29 March 2010). "Alice Walton: Working to bring the world to Arkansas' door". Arkansas Business. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  8. ^ Paul, Steve (10 December 2006). "Alice Walton's big picture: The Wal-Mart heir turns her eye, and her money, to art collecting". The Washington Post. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  9. ^ "Wal-Mart heiress loves cutting horses". The Associated Press. 19 December 1999. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  10. ^ Paul, Steven (November 19, 2006). "Alice L. Walton, Making a Grand Dream a Reality: The Jet-Setter Is Parlaying Her Wealth into a Hometown Museum". The Kansas City Star. 
  11. ^ Baker, Max B. (1 July 2016). "Alice Walton cuts prices on two ranch properties". Star-Telegram. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  12. ^ Sherman, Erik (17 September 2015). "Wal-Mart heiress selling these 'iconic' ranches for $48 million". Fortune. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  13. ^ "Wal-Mart heiress brings art museum to the Ozarks". NPR. 8 November 2011. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 

Request: Art[edit]


Hi! Continuing along. Art is fairly well developed. There are, however, a few places that could be tidier. Here's what I'm thinking.

  • The last sentence of the first paragraph says Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art "is envisioned as … ". It seems a bit off to refer to a museum that has been open for nearly six years as "envisioned as". I propose we rewrite: "Crystal Bridges opened in November 2011 with hundreds of millions of dollars in art housed in 50,000 square feet of gallery space.[1]"
  • In the middle of the second paragraph, this sentence does not read encyclopedic in tone: "Since almost every collector was at the auction, no one could figure out who on the phone was bidding such high prices." I propose we rewrite: "Collectors at the well-attended auction questioned who was placing successful bids over the telephone.[2]"
  • In the following sentence, would it make sense to list some of the art that was bought that day? I propose we rewrite: "It was later learned that Walton purchased at least $20 million worth of art that day, including “Spring,” by Winslow Homer; “A French Music Hall,” by Everett Shinn; “The Studio,” by George Bellows; “The Indian and the Lily,” by George de Forest Brush; and “October Interior,” a by Fairfield Porter.[2]"
  • I also suggest we add sources throughout this section
  • Lastly, is it necessary to mention that Ms. Walton's 2005 purchase of Asher Brown Durand's Kindred Spirits was "a sealed-bid auction"?

This draft below includes all of the aforementioned changes.

Art
Art

Walton purchased her first piece of art when she was about ten years old. It was a reproduction of Picasso's Blue Nude she got from her father's Ben Franklin Dime-Store.[2] She and her mother would often paint watercolors on camping trips.[2] Her interest in art led to her spearheading the Walton Family Foundation's involvement in developing Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in the heart of Bentonville, Arkansas.[2][3] Crystal Bridges opened in November 2011 with hundreds of millions of dollars in art housed in 50,000 square feet of gallery space.[1]

In December 2004, the art collection of Daniel Fraad and wife, Rita, went up for public auction at Sotheby's in New York.[2] Collectors at the well-attended auction questioned who was placing successful bids over the telephone.[2] It was later learned that Walton purchased at least $20 million worth of art that day, including “Spring,” by Winslow Homer; “A French Music Hall,” by Everett Shinn; “The Studio,” by George Bellows; “The Indian and the Lily,” by George de Forest Brush; and “October Interior,” a by Fairfield Porter.[2] She bid for most of the items while on a three-year-old gelding named IC LAD preparing to compete in the first qualifying round of the National Cutting Horse Association Futurity at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Ft. Worth, Texas.[2]

In 2005, Walton purchased Asher Brown Durand's celebrated painting, Kindred Spirits, for a purported US$35 million.[2] The 1849 painting, a tribute to Hudson River School painter Thomas Cole, had been given to the New York Public Library in 1904 by Julia Bryant, the daughter of Romantic poet and New York newspaper publisher William Cullen Bryant (who is depicted in the painting with Cole).[4] She has also purchased works by American painter Edward Hopper, as well as a notable portrait of George Washington by Charles Willson Peale.[5] In 2009 at an undisclosed price, Crystal Bridges museum acquired Norman Rockwell's iconic "Rosie the Riveter" painting for its permanent collection.[6][7]

John Wilmerding, an advisor and board member to Crystal Bridges said Walton has collected the work of some artists in depth, quietly buying substantial bodies of work by Martin Johnson Heade, Stuart Davis, George Bellows and John Singer Sargent.[8] Walton's attempt to quit smoking led to the purchase of two great smoking paintings by Alfred Maurer and Tom Wesselman.[2] In a 2011 interview, she spoke about acquiring great works by other artists. She described Marsden Hartley as "one of my favorite artists—he was a very complex guy, somewhat tormented, but a very spiritual person, and love the emotion and the feel and the spirituality of his work". She went on to say, "and Andrew Wyeth—the mystery and loneliness that is expressed. How do you paint loneliness?"[2]

Markup

==Art==
[[File:Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art--2012-04-12.jpg|thumb|right|[[Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art]], Bentonville, Arkansas]]
Walton purchased her first piece of art when she was about ten years old. It was a reproduction of [[Picasso]]'s ''Blue Nude'' she got from her father's Ben Franklin Dime-Store.<ref name="The New Yorker" /> She and her mother would often paint watercolors on camping trips.<ref name="The New Yorker" /> Her interest in art led to her spearheading the Walton Family Foundation's involvement in developing Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in the heart of Bentonville, Arkansas.<ref name="The New Yorker"/><ref name="NPR 11"/> Crystal Bridges opened in November 2011 with hundreds of millions of dollars in art housed in 50,000 square feet of gallery space.<ref name="Smith 11">{{cite news |title=Crystal Bridges, the art museum Walmart money built, opens |last1=Smith |first1=Roberta |url=http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/27/arts/design/crystal-bridges-the-art-museum-walmart-money-built-review.html |newspaper=[[The New York Times]] |date=26 December 2011 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref>

In December 2004, the art collection of Daniel Fraad and wife, Rita, went up for public auction at [[Sotheby's]] in New York.<ref name="The New Yorker" /> Collectors at the well-attended auction questioned who was placing successful bids over the telephone.<ref name="The New Yorker" /> It was later learned that Walton purchased at least $20 million worth of art that day, including “Spring,” by [[Winslow Homer]]; “A French Music Hall,” by [[Everett Shinn]]; “The Studio,” by [[George Bellows]]; “The Indian and the Lily,” by [[George de Forest Brush]]; and “October Interior,” a by [[Fairfield Porter]].<ref name="The New Yorker" /> She bid for most of the items while on a three-year-old gelding named IC LAD preparing to compete in the first qualifying round of the National Cutting Horse Association Futurity at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Ft. Worth, Texas.<ref name="The New Yorker" />

In 2005, Walton purchased [[Asher Brown Durand]]'s celebrated painting, ''[[Kindred Spirits (painting)|Kindred Spirits]]'', for a purported US$35 million.<ref name="The New Yorker" /> The 1849 painting, a tribute to [[Hudson River School]] painter [[Thomas Cole]], had been given to the [[New York Public Library]] in 1904 by Julia Bryant, the daughter of Romantic poet and New York newspaper publisher [[William Cullen Bryant]] (who is depicted in the painting with Cole).<ref name="Kindred Spirits">{{cite web |url= http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/durandinfo.shtm |title= Asher B. Durand's 'Kindred Spirits' |department= Exhibitions |publisher= National Gallery of Art}}</ref> She has also purchased works by American painter [[Edward Hopper]], as well as a notable portrait of [[George Washington]] by [[Charles Willson Peale]].<ref name="Vogel 05">{{cite news |title=A determined heiress plots an art collection |last1=Vogel |first1=Carol |url=http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/14/arts/design/a-determined-heiress-plots-an-art-collection.html?_r=0 |newspaper=[[The New York Times]] |date=14 May 2005 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref> In 2009 at an undisclosed price, Crystal Bridges museum acquired [[Norman Rockwell]]'s iconic "[[Rosie the Riveter#Saturday Evening Post|Rosie the Riveter]]" painting for its permanent collection.<ref>[http://www.rosietheriveter.org/painting.htm Rosie the Riveter] {{webarchive |url=https://web.archive.org/web/20090207091017/http://www.rosietheriveter.org/painting.htm |date=February 7, 2009 }}</ref><ref name="Brantley 09">{{cite news |title='Rosie the Riveter' to Crystal Bridges |last1=Brantley |first1=Max |url=https://www.arktimes.com/ArkansasBlog/archives/2009/06/08/rosie-the-riveter-to-crystal-bridges |newspaper=[[Arkansas Times]] |date=8 June 2009 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref>

[[John Wilmerding]], an advisor and board member to Crystal Bridges said Walton has collected the work of some artists in depth, quietly buying substantial bodies of work by [[Martin Johnson Heade]], [[Stuart Davis (painter)|Stuart Davis]], [[George Bellows]] and [[John Singer Sargent]].<ref name="Vogel 11">{{cite news |title= A Billionaire's Eye for Art Shapes Her Singular Museum |work= The New York Times |date= June 16, 2011 |first= Carol |last= Vogel |url= https://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/17/arts/design/alice-walton-on-her-crystal-bridges-museum-of-american-art.html }}</ref> Walton's attempt to quit smoking led to the purchase of two great smoking paintings by [[Alfred Maurer]] and [[Tom Wesselman]].<ref name="The New Yorker" /> In a 2011 interview, she spoke about acquiring great works by other artists. She described [[Marsden Hartley]] as "one of my favorite artists—he was a very complex guy, somewhat tormented, but a very spiritual person, and love the emotion and the feel and the spirituality of his work". She went on to say, "and [[Andrew Wyeth]]—the mystery and loneliness that is expressed. How do you paint loneliness?"<ref name="The New Yorker" />

Are there editors who can assist with this? (Pinging Altamel and st170e, who responded to previous edit requests). I will not direct edit this page because I have a Wikipedia:Conflict of interest; I work with the Walton family office, as I disclosed on my user page and declared above. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 18:38, 8 August 2017 (UTC)

This request was not answered, so I opened it again. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 19:18, 12 December 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ a b Smith, Roberta (26 December 2011). "Crystal Bridges, the art museum Walmart money built, opens". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Mead, Rebecca (June 27, 2011). "Alice's Wonderland: A Walmart Heiress Builds a Museum in the Ozarks". The New Yorker. 
  3. ^ "Wal-Mart heiress brings art museum to the Ozarks". NPR. 8 November 2011. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  4. ^ "Asher B. Durand's 'Kindred Spirits'". Exhibitions. National Gallery of Art. 
  5. ^ Vogel, Carol (14 May 2005). "A determined heiress plots an art collection". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  6. ^ Rosie the Riveter Archived February 7, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Brantley, Max (8 June 2009). "'Rosie the Riveter' to Crystal Bridges". Arkansas Times. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  8. ^ Vogel, Carol (June 16, 2011). "A Billionaire's Eye for Art Shapes Her Singular Museum". The New York Times. 
check Partially implemented  Spintendo  ᔦᔭ  21:36, 12 December 2017 (UTC)

Request: Automobile incidents[edit]

I appreciate that editors are still considering my previous requests. While those remain open, I’d like to address the Automobile incidents portion of Personal life by bringing to your attention three points: 1) It details two car accidents that never resulted in charges, so I question their appropriateness in an encyclopedia; 2) The language used convicts Ms. Walton of a crime for which she was never charged nor convicted; and 3) It includes speculation. Here are points for your consideration:

  • It details two incidents that never resulted in charges
    • The accident in Mexico was a single-vehicle accident from 34 years ago. No one other than Ms. Walton was injured in the crash, and it was never a legal issue.
    • The last paragraph details a 2011 DWI arrest for which charges were not filed.
    • In my opinion, these fall under WP:NOTNEWS and do not belong in an encyclopedia. Also, from WP:BLP: "Wikipedia is an encyclopedia, not a tabloid: it is not Wikipedia's job to be sensationalist, or to be the primary vehicle for the spread of titillating claims about people's lives." However, if the 2011 arrest is to remain, I'd argue it needs to be edited, because it leads me to my next point.
  • The language used convicts Ms. Walton of a crime for which she was never charged, nor convicted
    • The article says Ms. Walton "was again arrested for driving while intoxicated." Ms. Walton was arrested for allegedly driving while intoxicated. She was never charged with a crime, nor was she convicted of it. In fact, the arrest was expunged.
  • It seems some of the copy includes speculation
    • The language around the 1989 accident it speculates that Ms. Walton "was speeding at the time of the accident." The official record shows that Ms. Walton was not charged with wrongdoing; anything suggesting otherwise is speculation and should be removed. To quote BLP: "A conviction is secured through judicial proceedings; accusations, investigations and arrests do not amount to a conviction."

With the above in mind and especially considering the two Wikipedia policies noted, I prepared a draft for your consideration. I appreciate your willingness to review and consider the suggested draft below.

Automobile incidents

Automobile incidents[edit]

In a 1989 incident, Walton was driving when she struck and killed 50-year-old Oleta Hardin, who had stepped into a Fayetteville, Arkansas, road.[1][2] Walton was not charged in the accident.[3] In a 1998 incident, she was reported to have hit a gas meter while driving under the influence. She paid a $925 fine.[4][5]

Markup

===Automobile incidents===
In a 1989 incident, Walton was driving when she struck and killed 50-year-old Oleta Hardin, who had stepped into a [[Fayetteville, Arkansas]], road.<ref name=OConnor2013/><ref name="Serwer 04">{{cite news |title=The Waltons: Inside America's richest family |last1=Serwer |first1=Andy |url=http://archive.fortune.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2004/11/15/8191093/index.htm |newspaper=[[Fortune (magazine)|Fortune]] |date=15 November 2004 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref> Walton was not charged in the accident.<ref name="The New Yorker"/> In a 1998 incident, she was reported to have hit a gas meter while [[driving under the influence]]. She paid a $925 fine.<ref name="OConnor2013"/><ref>{{cite news |url= http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/the-woman-who-put-the-art-in-walmart-399462.html |title= The Woman Who Put the Art in Wal-Mart |date= November 8, 2007 |accessdate= April 23, 2011 |newspaper= [[The Independent]] |location= London}}</ref>

I will not direct edit this page because I have a Wikipedia:Conflict of interest; I work with the Walton family office, as I disclosed on my user page and declared above. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 16:14, 4 December 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ O'Connor, Clair (October 7, 2013). "Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector". Forbes. 
  2. ^ Serwer, Andy (15 November 2004). "The Waltons: Inside America's richest family". Fortune. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  3. ^ Mead, Rebecca (June 27, 2011). "Alice's Wonderland: A Walmart Heiress Builds a Museum in the Ozarks". The New Yorker. 
  4. ^ O'Connor, Clair (October 7, 2013). "Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector". Forbes. 
  5. ^ "The Woman Who Put the Art in Wal-Mart". The Independent. London. November 8, 2007. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 

Already done  Spintendo  ᔦᔭ  23:39, 8 December 2017 (UTC)

This request was not answered, so I opened it again. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 19:19, 12 December 2017 (UTC)
 Declined
  1. The changes listed under the proposed markup mirror the text already emplaced in the article, which states:

    In an April 1989 incident, she struck and killed 50-year-old Oleta Hardin, who had stepped onto a road. Witnesses stated that Walton was speeding at the time of the accident, but no charges were filed.[1] In a 1998 incident, she was reported to have hit a gas meter while driving under the influence. She paid a $925 fine and served no jail time.[2][3]

  2. The question over what the article's language suggests by stating "arrested for" in either incident is moot because those statements, when read to their conclusions, leave no doubt that while she may have been detained by law enforement — she was ultimately not charged by the legal authorities in those areas.
  3. Additional proposals on this matter would go beyond the purview of the COI Edit Request System. In which case, may I suggest WP:CONTENTDISPUTE.
Regards,  Spintendo  ᔦᔭ  21:36, 12 December 2017 (UTC)

References

Hi, Spintendo. Thank you for reviewing this request. Just to clarify a couple points, my thought with your point #1 above is that the article currently says witnesses reported that Ms. Walton was speeding at the time of the accident. But since no charges were filed, it seems unfounded and I question if that particular detail belongs in the encyclopedia. Regarding your point #2: To me, the wording "was again arrested for driving while intoxicated" implies that the crime actually happened. This was an allegation and I think it should be reported as such, regardless if it is later written that she was never convicted of it. As for point #3, I had previously posted a request at WP:BLP/N and it is still open. I am also pinging Altamel and st170e, who have discussed previous edit requests here. I appreciate everyone's time and input. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 14:55, 18 December 2017 (UTC)

Under discussion at WP:BLPN#Alice Walton. --GRuban (talk) 16:11, 4 January 2018 (UTC)

Removed 2011 incident per discussion on WP:BLPN ... which no one else seems to have participated in. To summarize my reasoning, charges were dropped, and a mere arrest isn't very notable. --GRuban (talk) 16:03, 12 January 2018 (UTC)
Thanks again, GRuban! Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 19:26, 12 January 2018 (UTC)

Request: Personal life[edit]


Hi! Another request here. This time I would like to finish out updating Personal life. I propose we replace the introduction to this section and the Family section with the following, while keeping the existing Automobile incidents section at the end.

The existing Personal life section begins with Ms. Walton's divorces and it seems to me that these are not particularly noteworthy. So you'll see in my draft that I have begun Personal life with information on Ms. Walton and her family, followed by net worth, residence, and a shortened sentence on her divorces.


Personal life
Personal life

Alice Walton is the only daughter and youngest child of Walmart founder Sam Walton and Helen Walton.[1] She has three brothers, Rob Walton, Jim Walton, and the late John T. Walton.[1][2]

She is niece of James "Bud" Walton[1][3] and first cousin of Ann Walton Kroenke, Nancy Walton Laurie, and Sybil Robson Orr.[1][4]

As a Walmart heiress, Walton's net worth was $33.8 billion at the time of Forbes' annual The World's Billionaires list in 2017, making her the 17th richest person in the world, and the second-richest woman.[5]

She lives in Fort Worth, Texas.[6] She married and divorced twice.[7]

Markup

==Personal life==
Alice Walton is the only daughter and youngest child of Walmart founder [[Sam Walton]] and [[Helen Walton]].<ref name="Business Insider 13">{{cite web |url=http://www.businessinsider.com/meet-the-waltons-wal-mart-family-tree-2013-10 |title=Meet the Waltons: A guide to America's wealthiest family |author=Megan Willett and Mike Nudelman |date=9 October 2013 |publisher=[[Business Insider]] |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref> She has three brothers, [[S. Robson Walton|Rob Walton]], [[Jim Walton]], and the late [[John T. Walton]].<ref name="Business Insider 13"/><ref name="Porter 07">{{cite news |title=Helen Walton, matriarch of Wal-Mart family, dies at 87 |last1=Porter |first1=Helen |url=http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/21/business/21walton.html |newspaper=[[The New York Times]] |date=21 April 2007 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref>

She is niece of [[James "Bud" Walton]]<ref name="Business Insider 13"/><ref name="Vinton 16">{{cite news |title=Walton family members' fortune climbs $8.7 billion after strong quarter for Wal-Mart |last1=Vinton |first1=Kate |url=https://www.forbes.com/sites/katevinton/2016/05/19/walton-family-members-fortune-climbs-8-7-billion-after-strong-quarter-for-wal-mart/#7a150a6d79c3 |newspaper=[[Forbes]] |date=19 May 2016 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref> and first cousin of [[Ann Walton Kroenke]], [[Nancy Walton Laurie]], and [[Sybil Robson Orr]].<ref name="Business Insider 13"/><ref name="Peacock 13">{{cite news |title=Keith Haring sculpture debuts at Crystal Bridges |last1=Peacock |first1=Leslie Newell |url=https://www.arktimes.com/RockCandy/archives/2013/04/24/keith-haring-sculpture-debuts-at-crystal-bridges |newspaper=[[Arkansas Times]] |date=24 April 2013 |accessdate=11 May 2017}}</ref>

As a Walmart heiress, Walton's net worth was $33.8 billion at the time of ''Forbes''' annual The World's Billionaires list in 2017, making her the 17th richest person in the world, and the second-richest woman.<ref name ="ForbesBillionaires"/>

She lives in Fort Worth, Texas.<ref name="Baker 16"/> She married and divorced twice.<ref name="OConnor2013"/>

Are there editors who can assist with this? I will not direct edit this page because I have a Wikipedia:Conflict of interest; I work with the Walton family office, as I disclosed on my user page and declared above. Thanks, Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 19:23, 30 January 2018 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ a b c d Megan Willett and Mike Nudelman (9 October 2013). "Meet the Waltons: A guide to America's wealthiest family". Business Insider. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  2. ^ Porter, Helen (21 April 2007). "Helen Walton, matriarch of Wal-Mart family, dies at 87". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  3. ^ Vinton, Kate (19 May 2016). "Walton family members' fortune climbs $8.7 billion after strong quarter for Wal-Mart". Forbes. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  4. ^ Peacock, Leslie Newell (24 April 2013). "Keith Haring sculpture debuts at Crystal Bridges". Arkansas Times. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  5. ^ "The World's Billionaires 2017". Forbes. 8 May 2017. Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  6. ^ Baker, Max B. (1 July 2016). "Alice Walton cuts prices on two ranch properties". Star-Telegram. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  7. ^ O'Connor, Clair (October 7, 2013). "Inside the World of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector". Forbes. 

Reply 30-JAN-2018[edit]

I'm leaving this template open to solicit other editor's responses. The COI editor wishes to replace information in this article regarding the descriptions of the subject's ex-husbands. That information is worded " Shortly thereafter she married a contractor who built her swimming pool, but they too quickly divorced.". Accordingly, I seek consensus on the wording as it stands now, and whether it should be altered. I put that question forward to other editors who may see this notice, and ask for their feedback. The passage in question is under the Personal life heading in the article. Regards, Spintendo ᔦᔭ 21:12, 30 January 2018 (UTC)

I agree it needs rephrasing. I don't agree it needs outright removal. The proposal is to name the subject's cousins, and yet to say nothing about her former husbands except to count them. That seems unbalanced; it's a rare person in whose life a marriage period played so little a part as to not deserve mention except to tick up a digit. Maybe we can give the years of each marriage and divorce, along with each former spouse's profession? I can imagine that the particular spouse built a swimming pool for her might not be too important.
I also wonder if the family and inheritance sections might be better in "early life", since "personal life" seems more things that she did, rather than things that happened to her. --GRuban (talk) 21:54, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
The main focus of the COI editor is to remove unflattering information regarding her failed marriage to a pool contractor. Make no mistake — the inclusion of the cousins is incidental; it is not their primary reason for the request.Spintendo ᔦᔭ 22:08, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
The wording is a direct quote from Clare O'Connor of Forbes magazine. I placed it in quotation marks, as it was not paraphrased. I now believe that the sentence is strongly referenced, and should remain in the article. Spintendo ᔦᔭ 22:20, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
(EC) I get that the request is more to remove the details on the spouses rather than to link the cousins. I'm not objecting to linking the cousins; if they're reasonably close relatives and have articles, it seems perfectly fine to link to their articles. I am objecting to just counting prior marriages; marriages are usually considered kind of a big deal. Even the article for Elizabeth Taylor, who had eight marriages, and who downplayed the significance of some of them, has a paragraph for each one. This article isn't that long, but neither is it a stub; surely each marriage is worth at least one descriptive sentence. --GRuban (talk) 22:23, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
I don't agree we need to keep in the pool. Is the pool really the most important thing about the marriage or the husband? Was it either the crowning achievement of his career, or the main reason for their relationship? Surely not. It seems condescending. His profession, yes, if you have to describe a person in only one sentence, mentioning their profession is a reasonably common way to do so, presumably it takes up a large and important portion of their life. I appreciate that it's a quote, but it's a flippant quote, and seems disrespectful, there is the strong implication that the marriage was a spur of the moment thing, without due consideration of the differences between the spouses. Unless we are specifically trying to say that - in which case, we need to give stronger evidence than a single quote - we can do better. --GRuban (talk) 22:44, 30 January 2018 (UTC)
I don't think there is anything flippant about it. I did at first, until I realized that the man or woman's career is mentioned because that's most often the first detail that accompanies a spouses description, such as "He married John Doe, a dentist from Cleveland". In Wedding announcements, the person's career is always mentioned, as it is in obituaries or other tidbits of news. If the opposition to a pool contracter also having their profession listed is because that would be embarrassing, that says more about our own personal prejudices regarding a pool contractor's insufficiency to marry an heiress more than anything else.Spintendo ᔦᔭ 23:33, 30 January 2018 (UTC)

──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── I can debate further, but it may not be useful. @Kt2011: does the "who built her swimming pool" part make any difference to you? Or would changing to profession and dates of marriage be just as bad to you? (... assuming we can find the dates; I admit a bit of web searching doesn't reveal more than that one sentence, honestly...) --GRuban (talk) 16:36, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

Spintendo and GRuban -- Thanks for both of your replies here. First up, I want to clarify that I am fine with mentioning the divorces and, to me, the occupation of her former spouses isn’t a big deal; I’m ok with that wording either staying or going. With that said, I do want to understand more what the correct detail to include here is (this will also help me make sure that future requests I make are appropriate).
My suggestions for this section were based on better wording and conforming to BLP standards; my understanding is that such details should rely on extent of sourcing, and there isn't that much sourcing about her previous marriages. (As Elizabeth Taylor was given as a comparison earlier, by contrast, her marriages have been the topics of documentaries, books and many magazine articles.) The only reliable source I see that includes detail about Ms. Walton's ex-husbands is the Forbes article "Inside The World Of Walmart Billionaire Alice Walton, America's Richest Art Collector," which is cited in the article. Other reliable sources say that Ms. Walton is divorced, yes, but do not offer detail on her marriages. That is why my draft simplified the topic by saying "She married and divorced twice." This is how other reliable sources have handled Ms. Walton's marital status:
  • The New Yorker: "Walton, who was married briefly in her twenties, has no children, and she has encouraged several of her nephews and nieces to develop an interest in art"
  • The Washington Post: "Over the years, she married and divorced at least twice."
  • Forbes: "MARITAL STATUS: Divorced"
  • Business Insider: "Twice divorced with no children, Walton is also a lover of horses, which she breeds at Rocking W Ranch, located in Texas, and rides competitively."
  • The New York Times: Ms. Walton, who is divorced, has no children."
  • The Independent: "She's been married and divorced at least twice."
Other sources that include the same level of detail on Ms. Walton's marriages as the aforementioned Forbes article are websites such as salaryandnetworth.com and knownetworth.com. They offer no new detail beyond what is written in the Forbes piece or, as a result, appears on Wikipedia.
On the other details included in my suggestion... as Ms. Walton's cousins are already in the article, what I did was rearrange the family section slightly to make more sense and add some sourcing to support. As it is now, the article mentions one brother, then her cousins, then her two other brothers, followed by her father, mother and uncle. It makes more sense to me to start with her parents, siblings, uncle, and cousins. (As an aside, there has been much more written about the Walton family then Ms. Walton's divorces, so I do not find it overly detailed to include notable family members.) I had also suggested adding her current residence, which seemed straightforward, so I hope that can be added if you have no concerns. That would need to be updated in the Infobox, as well.
Finally, GRuban, I see you think net worth might better serve the article in another section, that seems fine to me and I'm open to your thoughts on that.
I appreciate your willingness to review, consider and discuss the suggested draft. Should we seek further input, perhaps we can ask other editors interested in WP:BLP how best to handle? Thanks again for your time on this one. Kt2011 (Talk · COI:Walton family) 18:27, 31 January 2018 (UTC)

────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────It's been four days since any input was received, and there still seems to be no consensus here for these changes. I think your suggestion of WP:BLPN is an excellent idea.
Regards, Spintendo ᔦᔭ 16:10, 4 February 2018 (UTC)