Talk:Alpha Phi Alpha

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Former featured articleAlpha Phi Alpha is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophyThis article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on July 25, 2006.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
April 19, 2006Peer reviewReviewed
April 28, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
May 11, 2006Featured article candidatePromoted
April 24, 2015Featured article reviewDemoted
Current status: Former featured article


greek art depicting fair skinned people[edit]

There is no citation given for this highly contentious opinion. Almost all greek pottery renders figures as black on orange or orange on black, so pottery is a non starter for claims of a 'fair skinned' greek art. Greek marble tends to be of light colouring, but since these were probably painted and have lost pigment, that is not a strong indicator of 'fairness' either. Given that many 'greeks' were in north africa, there needs to be at least a proper academic citation for a general greek depiction of 'fair skin'.

2018-08-23 Edits to content to remove NPOV[edit]

ORIGINAL: In 1989, Joel Harris, age 18, a student at Morehouse College, died after suffering from what the Cobb County medical examiner's office called "an intensive amount of anxiety and stress" after a night of hazing. Harris had been punched in the chest and slapped in the face multiple times as part of a so-called "thunder and lightning" ritual hours before his death.[1]

EDIT: In 1989, Joel Harris an Alpha Phi Alpha aspirant, age 18, a student at Morehouse College died following suspected hazing. The medical examiners report “The medical examiner's report “didn't declare the hazing to be a "direct cause" of Joel's death, but it stated that he was "under an intensive amount of anxiety and stress" that night. It was reported that Harris had been punched in the chest and slapped in the face multiple times as part of a so-called "thunder and lightning" ritual hours before his death. [2]

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ORIGINAL: In 1992, Gregory R. Batipps, age 20, a student at the University of Virginia, died in a car accident after falling asleep at the wheel. He was sleep-deprived due to hazing while pledging Alpha Phi Alpha.[3]

EDIT: In 1992, Gregory R. Batipps, age 20, a student at the University of Virginia, died in a car accident after falling asleep at the wheel. Hazing was investigated as a factor in his death as he was pledging Alpha Phi Alpha.In 1992, Gregory R. Batipps, age 20, a student at the University of Virginia, died in a car accident after falling asleep at the wheel.[4]

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ORIGINAL: In 2008, Mcandy Douarin, age 26, a student at the University of Central Florida (UCF), died of hazing induced heart failure while pledging Alpha Phi Alpha. Douarin shared with his family that he was frequently punched in the chest by members of Alpha Phi Alpha as part of the pledging process and his family released photos of bruises on his chest to validate that was the reason why he died. Released photos and statements from UCF students validating Douarin was pledging the fraternity, the university refused to launch an investigation on any allegations against them after the fraternity stated Douarin had not officially applied for membership. The family hired an attorney to help hold the fraternity accountable for his death.[5][6]

EDIT: In 2008, Mcandy Douarin, age 26, a student at the University of Central Florida (UCF), died from "heart-related failure less than 12 hours after a punch to his chest." [7] Douarin shared with his family that he was frequently punched in the chest by members of Alpha Phi Alpha as part of the pledging process and his family released photos of bruises on his chest to validate that was the reason why he died. UCF students released photos and statements substantiating that Douarin was pledging the fraternity, but the university refused to launch an investigation on any allegations against them after the fraternity stated Douarin had not officially applied for membership. The family hired an attorney to help hold the fraternity accountable for his death.[8][9]

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ORIGINAL: On January 29, 2016, Bradley Doyley, a senior and basketball player at Buffalo State College was pronounced dead as a result of a pledging hazing ritual. Doyley as a pledge was asked to drink an unidentified toxic cocktail off campus by members of Alpha Phi Alpha that caused him to suddenly vomit blood according to a close family friend. Doyley was taken to a local hospital for an emergency surgery where he eventually died. The chapter connected with the death of Doyley has been suspended by the college and members of the fraternity are under investigation for homicide charges. Doyley was four months away from graduation.[10]

EDIT: On January 29, 2016, Bradley Doyley, a senior and basketball player at Buffalo State College was pronounced dead allegedly of a hazing related pledging ritual. Family and friends reported that Doyley was asked to drink an unidentified toxic cocktail off campus by members of Alpha Phi Alpha that caused him to suddenly vomit blood according to a close family friend. Doyley was taken to a local hospital for an emergency surgery where he eventually died. The chapter connected with the death of Doyley has was suspended by the college and members of the fraternity while under investigation for homicide charges. A report published, citing unnamed police sources, stated that “here is no evidence of hazing in the death last week of a student at Buffalo State College in New York” citing a preliminary autopsy [11].

--Rattler98 (talk) 14:05, 25 August 2018 (UTC)

@Rattler98: You're going to have to address each of the statements you believe is inaccurate one-by-one instead of lumping them all together and making vague claims of NPOV. If there is misinformation in this article then of course we want it to be corrected or removed! But it's impossible for anyone to know if that's the case when you don't make specific claims that anyone can investigate.
It's especially worrying that nearly all of your edits have been to remove negative information from this article as if you're more interested in promoting this topic than you are to editing this encyclopedia article in a neutral manner. If you happen to have a connection to this subject, please ensure that you're complying with our conflict of interest guidelines. If you have a close connection with this subject (e.g., you're a member of this organization) then you probably should confine your edits to requests and discussion in Talk. ElKevbo (talk) 02:16, 25 August 2018 (UTC)
@ElKevbo: I am not attempting to remove negative information, I am attempting to remove inaccurate information. As an editor/administrator I would think that this is a priority for you, as well as trying to reach consensus on the issues at hand that I have laid out regarding each of the citations that contain inaccuracies. I have stated each above in a new section, one by one, for your clarity. If there is are additional suggestions or recommendation I would ask that you follow Wikipedia's policies regarding items that are in dispute by utilizing the NPOV tag and instead of continuing to restore content without explanation and by assert your admin powers by alleging possible COI and Edit warring violations. If there is something that is incorrect, let's work to fix it together. I've stated my suggested revisions above. Wikipedia:Dispute resolution
--Rattler98 (talk) 14:16, 25 August 2018 (UTC)
I'm fine with the proposed edits you outlined above. I suggest waiting a few days so other editors can chime in. ElKevbo (talk) 22:57, 25 August 2018 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ David Mills, Fraternity Violence: The Pledging Debate: The Greeks: There is a move afoot to do away with hazing, but the traditionalists are outraged and vow to fight, Washington Post (July 24, 1990).
  2. ^ David Mills, Fraternity Violence: The Pledging Debate: The Greeks: There is a move afoot to do away with hazing, but the traditionalists are outraged and vow to fight, Washington Post (July 24, 1990).
  3. ^ Hazing Suspected In U.Va Student's Death: Roommate Cites Sleep Deprivation, Daily Press (April 4, 1992).
  4. ^ Hazing Suspected In U.Va Student's Death: Roommate Cites Sleep Deprivation, Daily Press (April 4, 1992).
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved 2015-11-27. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ Hank Nuwer. "UCF update: school says death was not hazing-related; family wants answers to cause of death".
  7. ^ Nuwer, Hank. "UCF update: school says death was not hazing-related; family wants answers to cause of death". Hank Newer's Hazing Clearinghouse.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved 2015-11-27. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Hank Nuwer. "UCF update: school says death was not hazing-related; family wants answers to cause of death".
  10. ^ Campbell, Andy (February 20, 2016). "College Student's Bizarre Death Allegedly Linked To Frat Hazing" – via Huff Post.
  11. ^ Campbell, Andy (February 20, 2016). "College Student's Bizarre Death Allegedly Linked To Frat Hazing" – via Huff Post.Helm, Angela Bronner. "Police: No Evidence of Hazing in Buffalo State Student's Death". The Root. The Root.

Article Evaluation[edit]

This article is well written and the origins, mission, and current endeavors of the fraternity are all clearly explained. Appropriate citation is given to most factual claims enabling further research or verification on the part of the reader. The structure of the article is organized and accessible and fraternity is discussed in a fairly balanced way.

Some of the sources cited link directly to the fraternity’s website, which may contain verifiable facts and figures but may not be the most reliable source for the perceived interest in and impact of the fraternity. However, there are also various citations that link to news media, online articles, print articles, and books. Nearly every sentence is cited, although some factoids (that are most likely common knowledge to members of the fraternity) aren’t cited at all and stand as unverified statements such as:

  • Its archives are preserved at the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.
  • National programs and initiatives of the fraternity include A Voteless People Is a Hopeless People, My Brother's Keeper, Go To High School, Go To College, Project Alpha, and the World Policy Council. It also conducts philanthropic programming initiatives with the March of Dimes, Head Start, the Boy Scouts of America, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.
  • The founders are collectively known as the Seven Jewels.
  • The fraternity began to participate in voting rights issues, coining the well-known phrase "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" as part of its effort to register black voters. This term was coined by the Alpha Omicron Chapter located at Johnson C. Smith University in 1936.
  • After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the nation's entry into World War II, the fraternity fought to secure rights for its membership within the ranks of officers in the armed forces.
  • The types of warfare encountered evidenced the nexus between education and war, with illiteracy decreasing a soldier's usefulness to the Army that could only be addressed with the inclusion of a large number of college educated men among the ranks of officers. Alpha men served in almost every branch of the military and civilian defense programs during World War II.

Being formerly a Featured Article, Wikipedia's Manual of Style is respected to the letter. There is a general adherence to the current use of style, proper formatting of paragraphs, page breaks, grammatical considerations such as capitalization of proper nouns, spelling and subject-verb agreement, and appropriate citing. The content of the article itself is, for the most part, written with a neutral point of view and the only text that could come close to “lauding” or “praising” the subject was to be found (perhaps understandably) in the “Notable Members” section. Also in that section were two Supreme Court cases (Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education) that were not hyperlinked to their existing articles nor cited at the end of the sentence.

The revision history of the article is fairly active with disagreements over point of view, sourcing, quote handling, formatting, copyright violations, and updating dead citations. I also noted that, for an African-American organization that some may view as militant, there was surprisingly little vandalism, racial or otherwise.

Overall, this article has minor faults but remains well worth its former Featured status. It was informative, expansive and detailed. It comprehensively covered most aspects of the fraternity and provided enough resources for further research to facilitate a serious understanding of what Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. is.

Strdvnt (talk) 20:05, 14 June 2019 (UTC)