Talk:Andy Warhol's Frankenstein

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I've removed this completely incomprehensible sentence: "The film was shot in 3-D in Italy and supports its landscapes and music, including some themes by Richard Wagner." - What the hell does this mean? How does it "support" Italy's "landscapes and music"? What does the German Wagner have to do with Italy other than being one of very many non-Italians to compose opera?

I added that the 3D film was shown in London in the (late) 70s, where I saw it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Stu McCallum (talkcontribs) 10:21, 21 March 2010 (UTC)

sounds more like a review[edit]

Andy Warhol's Frankenstein is suffused with the crumbling glamour of old Italian films, paying homage to (while simultaneously parodying) the earnest and stark visual and psychological beauty of the horror films on which it is based. Morrissey's sense of ironic detachment gives the film a gruesomely comic modernity and beauty all its own.

Am I the only one with a problem with the wording of this? Sounds a lot more like a review. Seeing as there's only one other post on this talk page I might just edit it myself, but I'll wait a little bit to see if there are any objections. Anoldtreeok (talk) 11:37, 8 July 2010 (UTC)