Talk:Aperture priority

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lower tech option[edit]

AIUI what we now call aperture priority has the advantage over shutter priority and full-auto modes that it doesn't require motorized aperture control in the lens. So (assuming light metering is through the lens) it can be used with pretty much any lens. 188.222.186.27 (talk) 03:46, 1 August 2015 (UTC)

Silly sentence[edit]

This sentence below is kind of silly:

Another common use of aperture priority mode is to suggest how the camera should determine a shutter speed, without risking a poor exposure. In landscape photography a user would select a small aperture when photographing a waterfall, hoping to allow the water to blur through the frame.

Of course since aperture/shutter-speed are both used to get a good exposure this will happen. But if you were trying to "adjust shutter speed without risking a poor exposure", you'd use Shutter priority mode... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.109.247.183 (talk) 04:46, 22 July 2016 (UTC)

I agree that the section isn't very clear and perhaps can be worded better, but I'm of the opinion that that particular point is actually accurate. I'd guess it's more common for a photographer in that situation (if not shooting in manual mode) to set the aperture priority to allow the smallest amount of light possible, and let the camera determine shutter speed for the lighting conditions in each shot. Since the aperture is at its smallest possible diameter, the photographer can be sure that the slowest possible shutter speed will be used, and therefore create the greatest possible blurring effect of the water for each shot, while maintaining proper exposure. When using shutter priority mode, you might be missing some 'slowness', if lighting conditions momentarily get cloudier and darker, for example - it would open up the aperture up rather than slow the shutter speed down. Does that make sense? AdventurousSquirrel (talk) 05:10, 22 July 2016 (UTC)