Talk:Bank holiday

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Link to public holidays[edit]

The USA equivalent is a Federal Holiday.

Removing US-centrism. This article is about the UK. The US has nothing to do with it. -- Tarquin 16:52 24 May 2003 (UTC)

But isn't it nice to know what the equivalent concepts in other countries are? Cross-linking between articles on different countries' versions of the same things is good, because it enables one to compare and contrast how they do things. -- Oliver P. 17:00 24 May 2003 (UTC)

I am a Brit, and I put in the link to Federal Holiday. I had just edited that article, and linked back to the UK equivalent from there as well. I am the first to castigate US-centrism, but they can't be blamed for this. jimfbleak 17:29 24 May 2003 (UTC)


ah. But then we'd have to link to a HUGE list of equivalents, unless there are some which are particularly similar. We link up to public holiday, no? sorry for paranoia! ;-) -- Tarquin 17:41 24 May 2003 (UTC)
OK, sorry for snappiness, feel free to revert my revert. jimfbleak 17:48 24 May 2003 (UTC)

In the US, the term "bank holiday" sometimes refers to the practice during the Great Depression of forcing banks to close to prevent the rapid withdrawal of all funds from a bank, which would have led to bank insolvency of course. Thus bank holidays were used to slow down panic attacks. -- Myria 22:09, 6 Oct 2004 (UTC)

the "Bank Holiday" of 1933 that you are refering to created a new type of banking in the united States of America, look in Blacks Law Dictionary Fourth edition, member banks of the Federal Reserve System can only conduct banking business during an emergency declaired by the President. Are the banks open? Yes, and we are still under that national emergency declaired by FDR. The Tradeing with the Enemy Act of 1917 was also ammended by FDR to include citizens of the United States as the enemy's. January 26, 2005

Many people call the first May bank Holiday "May Day", shouldn´t that go in the article? --Villamota 13:18, 4 May 2005 (UTC)

The mention of US bank holidays is relevant since there is a such a term in the united states, but with a rather different meaning. It would be possible to split this article into "Bank Holiday (US)" and "Bank Holiday (UK)" (with the latter receiving the redirect from Bank Holiday), but there isn't enough info for a whole US article at the moment. I've made the US reference into a footnote as is used on other articles where a term has a secondary minor but relevant meaning. Is this reasonable? -- Tyler 01:19, 11 September 2005 (UTC)
I hadn't deleted the US paragraph, but moved it under a heading entitled "US usage". Your method seems fine, though. All the best Smileyrepublic 19:41, 11 September 2005 (UTC)

Australian Bank Holiday[edit]

Anyone know anything about the Australian Bank Holiday? It seems to fall on the first Monday of August based on 2005 - 2007, but I can find no definitive evidence anywhere... --postglock 05:40, 9 Jun 2005 (UTC)

As far as I can ascertain, the term "bank holiday" in Australia refers to a local holiday (on which banks are required to close in a defined district). The only "state"-wide Bank Holiday with that name is the Australian Capital Territory's first Monday in August holiday. New South Wales also has a "Bank Holiday" on the same date but it does not apply state-wide, and there are a number of districts in NSW with their own local holidays under the Banks and Bank Holidays Act 1912. Queensland also has local holidays called "bank holidays" (but are not "public holidays" as legally defined). Is all or any of this worth mentioning in the article, do you think? -- Picapica 9 July 2005 12:14 (UTC)

May Day bank holiday move 1995[edit]

Quote: Recent practice by Conservative governments has been for the May Bank Holiday to be on 8 May in years where it would otherwise fall on 1 May, presumably out of a desire to avoid the socialist connotations of International Workers' Day. This last happened in 1995.

This only happened in 1995. While it is true that the May Day holiday is not popular with many sections of the Conservative Party (very likely for the reasons mentioned above), this holiday has fallen on a Monday only twice under Conservative governments since its introduction in 1978: in 1989 and 1995. In 1989 it was celebrated on 1 May, the first Monday. In 1995 it was moved for one year to the second Monday, 8 May, "to commemorate the 50th anniversary of VE-Day". -- Picapica 14:02, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC)

On the contrary, this holiday always falls on a Monday. 20.133.0.13 (talk) 12:22, 20 May 2008 (UTC)
There's a difference between the actual May Day itself (a fixed day) and the bank holiday being shunted to the first Monday in May. Timrollpickering (talk) 21:58, 25 August 2008 (UTC)
Indeed. I expressed myself very poorly above. By "this holiday" I meant the international May Day; by the "it" of "it was celebrated" and "it was moved" I meant the UK's Early May Bank Holiday (to use its official name). -- Picapica (talk) 05:56, 21 June 2015 (UTC)

Republic of Ireland[edit]

I've aded columns for Enfland and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. The table makes mention of the ROI, but I don't have access to definative data about this. Another column would be appropriate. Rich Farmbrough 18:14, 16 December 2005 (UTC)

bank holiday[edit]

does anyone know why a bank holiday is on a monday and not a friday?

- For want of a better answer, if they were on Fridays, you'd be asking the opposite question.

- The same reason the song, tell me why I don't like Mondays isn't about Fridays, would be my guess.

Boxing Day falling after 26th December[edit]

The article says that Boxing Day could, strictly speaking, be on either 26th or 27th of December, because it's the first weekday following Christmas, citing the example of a Saturday Chrismtas bumping Boxing Day to Monday.

But if Christmas Day is on a Friday, Monday will still be the next weekday, making Boxing Day the 28th of December. If someone can confirm that, could they update the article?

It's the older definition of weekday as 'any day except Sunday'. Boxing Day automatically then occurs on the 27th, and is not a 'holiday in lieu of' (the day 'in lieu of Christmas' is therefor on the Tuesday as the next available non-statutory day). If the 26th is a Saturday then 'Boxing Day' is that day, and the 'holiday in lieu of' occurs on the Monday.

Sorry, this is confusing two separate days - Boxing Day (officially, the first working day after Christmas Day) and St. Stephen's Day (December 26th). The public holiday is Boxing Day, not St. Stephen's Day. I've accordingly updated the article removing references to St Stephen's Day --The Thieving Gypsy 21:45, 8 May 2007 (UTC)

If Christmas is on a Friday, Boxing day is still the 26th of December. The public holiday, however, will be taken on Monday the 28th, which is the same for any public holiday that falls on a weekend. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.210.217.61 (talk) 08:19, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

This has been discussed (a lot) at Talk:Boxing Day. Ultimately as it's a secular celebration there is no-one regulating the actual date beyond common usage, with the bank holiday being a slightly different beast. But public usage has settled on Sunday 26th being called Boxing Day. Timrollpickering (talk) 22:01, 25 August 2008 (UTC)

August Bank Holiday[edit]

I think the August bank holiday as instigated by the act of 1871 was at the start of August in both England and Scotland. So when and why did the August bank holiday move to the end of August? I can't find anything about this anywhere.

1971 (though trialled between 1965 and 1970). —Preceding unsigned comment added by I B Wright (talkcontribs) 07:06, 13 May 2008 (UTC)

I still have some diaries from the sixties and early seventies which show the date of the August Bank holiday. I note that in the article, the assertion that the bank holiday fell in September in some years needs a citation and the diaries show that this was the case in 1968 and 1969, when the name was changed to the Late Summer Bank holiday. It wasn't until 1969 that the Scottish holiday was moved back to the start of August. Will it tread on any toes if I try and tidy that paragraph up to show this. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.112.31.105 (talk) 14:24, 1 March 2013 (UTC)

New Years Day Holiday[edit]

In England and Wales, if 1 January falls at the weekend and the bank holiday is taken on the following Monday, is the 1 January a public holiday? My assumption is that it is not. Can anybody confirm this? Is the answer the same in Scotland - in respect of both 1 and 2 January?

NB. At Christmas, I understand that when the 25th and/or 26th occur at the weekend and the bank holidays are taken on the 26th, 27th or 28th (as appropriate), the 25th and/or 26th are public holidays.

This question is asked in respect of the enforcement of parking regulation where the relevant traffic order will control whether the regulations apply on bank holidays, which by virtue of O'Neill v George (1968) SJ 128 are taken as including any public holiday.

Although no longer relevant (the parking exemption on Bank Holidays long having been rescinded), the issue used to catch many people because although the 26th December was a Bank Holiday, the 25th was not. Thus when Christmas day falls on a weekend, the substitute day isn't considered a Bank Holiday either. Thus if the 25th lands on Sunday, then the 26th (Boxing Day) is a Bank Holiday, but the substitute day (27th) isn't. If both days land on the weekend, then the 27th (substitute for Christmas Day) isn't a Bank Holiday, but the 28th (substitute for Boxing Day) is a Bank Holiday. Note: that because the days are no longer defined by law, there is, in theory, nothing to prevent the latter occurence being proclaimed the other way around. 20.133.0.13 (talk) 12:22, 20 May 2008 (UTC)

Bank holidays et simile[edit]

82.7.53.2 (talk) 20:26, 23 December 2010 (UTC) http://www.theanswerbank.co.uk/Phrases-and-Sayings/article/why-are-bank-holidays-called-bank-holidays/ is a good clear article on bank holidays, etc, but without sources

Title[edit]

Since this article is so old (2002), I'm not going to do anything without seeing what others think, but should the title not be Bank holiday? (note the lower-case H). --Storkk 12:20, 22 September 2006 (UTC)

And can anybody answer the previous question (from me)? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 212.85.7.12 (talkcontribs).

I've been bold and moved it, and also fixed the capitalisation in the headings. "Bank holiday" isn't a proper noun so shouldn't be capitalised IMO. Hairy Dude 23:55, 30 April 2007 (UTC)

But why "bank holiday"?[edit]

"Bank holidays are so called because they are days upon which banks are shut and therefore (traditionally) no other businesses could operate..." I'm still not really clear about this, as the generic terms used here in Australia are "public holiday" and "school holiday". Are there holidays in the UK -- other than school holidays -- on which banks are open? Grant | Talk 15:55, 6 February 2007 (UTC)

'Bank Holiday' is a term defined by British law and in widespread common usage in the UK and Republic of Ireland. The term 'Public Holiday' is less used in the UK, and 'Bank Holiday' is the common-use substitute. However, common usage is that Bank Holidays are defined by the concept of a public holiday moved or always declared on a weekday (usually a Monday), wheras a public holiday would also include Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years Day and Good Friday which are not moved in this way - additional Bank Holidays are normally declared when Christmas Day, Boxing Day or New Years Day fall on a Saturday or Sunday, but otherwise these 'fixed date' holidays are not normally referred to as 'Bank Holidays'. 87.194.80.255 (talk) 14:24, 2 May 2009 (UTC)

Merge with Public holidays in the United Kingdom?[edit]

I'm tempted to propose a merge with Public holidays in the United Kingdom because this page is almost exactly the same doument. of course there's other information on here which doesn't fit on that page, which is about bank holidays so it might be another idea to move some of the information like the listings of the bank holidays to that page and keep the information about what a bank holiday actually is, and what it is in the USA etc - any thoughts? --Streaky 14:06, 9 April 2007 (UTC)

I agree and have added tags, you should be bold and add these tags if you even think it might be a merge and there is no discussion on the talk page. They are easy to remove if people disagree. GameKeeper 21:55, 8 May 2007 (UTC)

Maybe someone could clarify the actual differences or similarities between 'bank' holidays and 'public' holidays? Atraxus 20:26, 15 May 2007 (UTC)

    • A bank holiday is a type of public holiday 86.29.237.52 (talk) 10:16, 30 May 2008 (UTC)

Merge? Absolutely not! Bank holidays exist in Ireland also and don't always fall on the same dates. For example: there is no July BH in Ireland but there is a June BH. And of course there is no such day as "Boxing Day" in Ireland. (Sarah777)

Oppose merging, Ireland is not the United Kingdom. 193.95.165.190 09:40, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

Oppose also: in Scotland Bank Holidays and Public Holidays are not the same: Bank Holidays are for banks and are not necessarily public holidays for the rest of us! However this article should be changed perhaps. "bank holidays" used to be the term in general use but I think that the term "public holiday" has superseded it.IanB (talk) 15:41, 19 November 2007 (UTC)

Oppose; These pages are fine as they are, Bank Holiday is about a worldwide concept while Public holidays in the UK is about specifically the UK Highfields (talk) (contribs) 10:17, 30 May 2008 (UTC)

Bank holiday is certainly not a worldwide concept, it is very British. But since this strange term exists, there needs not to be more than an explanation of the etymology of the "bank" in holiday, and possibly an explanation of the difference of a "bank" holiday to a normal public holiday. --L.Willms (talk) 11:15, 26 December 2008 (UTC)

Oppose as well: Most of the Caribbean islands once attached to Britain have Bank holidays too. CaribDigita (talk) 23:09, 4 December 2008 (UTC)

Not Representative of a Worldwide View: Tag Removed[edit]

You'll forgive me if I dispense with the self-introductions. However, all my comments are given in good faith.

I have removed this tag for the following reasons:

  1. The tag states that "The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view of the subject.". However, the very first line of the entire article explicitly states that "A bank holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom and also in the Republic of Ireland". This article doesn't claim to represent a worldwide perspective due to its specific disambiguation to The United Kindgom and The Republic of Ireland at the earliest possible opportunity in the article. Therefore, as readers are not being misled as to the article's scope and context, the tag is not appropriate.
  2. The phrase "Bank Holiday" does have other meanings outside of the areas that were specifically disambiguated in the opening line of the article. However, those meanings are considered "minor" in those countries when compared to other phrases used in those areas (e.g. "Federal Holiday" is more widely used than "Bank Holiday" in the US, or "School Holiday" is used more in Australia). Therefore, Common Sense requires that the documentation of the concept of "Bank Holiday" with respect to those countries where it is a minor term cannot be given equal share of emphasis compared to countries where it is universally used. Common Sense should also confirm this as people who want to look up the term "Bank Holiday" are most likely to be looking at a document about, or talking about the United Kingdom or the Rep. of Ireland; the areas where the term it is most widely documented, and the areas that are disambiguated in the first line of the article. However, if Common Sense is not good enough to confirm the requirement, then Official Wikipedia Policy about giving undue weight to minority situations definitely confirms it.

My suggestion is to extend the disambiguation in the heading of the article so that it includes all countries for which the term "Bank Holiday" has the most widely documented and understood common meaning. This I believe was, and still is, the article's original intention. In this case, it will document the concept that most people coming to Wikipedia are likely to be looking-up.

In my opinion, some comments being raised are defying common sense somewhat given the article's original stated scope and context. If tagging is required, instead of using the "Worldwide Perspective" tag, the "This article primarily only deals with" tag is probably more appropriate as most other countries do not recognise the term "Bank Holiday" to the extent that the mentioned countries do. But then, the article states in its opening line that it is only documenting the UK and Rep. of Ireland so such a tag would not actually be stating anything useful.

Andrew81446 (talk) 03:18, 18 January 2008 (UTC)

Disputed - Nothing to do with Banks[edit]

It is a complete myth that 'Bank Holidays' have anything to do with banks. The fact that the Banks happen to be closed is nothing more than coincidence. It is also a complete myth that Good Friday is a Bank Holiday - it isn't. This is exemplified where there are legal exemptions to Bank Holidays. For example where parking restrictions are published as not applying on Bank Holidays, they are often enforced as normal on Good Friday and there is no defence that the Bank Holiday exemption applies. This was more of a problem meny years ago when there was an automatic exemption to UK 'yellow line' parking restrictions on Bank Holidays (no longer the case). 20.133.0.13 (talk) 12:35, 12 May 2008 (UTC)

Actually Christmas Day isn't a Bank Holiday either. Bank Holidays were introduced by the Bank Holidays Act 1871 (and indeed were not obviously to do with the Banks, which prior to the Act observed various days as holidays - some the same as the new Bank Holidays). These introduced (at that time) 4 public holidays (5 in Scotland). When that act was passed, Good Friday and Christmas Day were already established as days of rest and Christian Worship and thus did not neet to be included in the Act. Although there have been two additions to the Bank Holidays (New year's day and May Day) and two other changes (Whit Monday became fixed and August Bank holiday was moved to the end of August), Good Friday and Christmas day are still excluded. It should be pointed out that since 1971, Bank Holidays are no longer a statutory provision, but are proclaimed annually by Royal Proclamation (that is the 6 other than Good Friday and Christmas Day). This makes it simple to deal with the non fixed days (New year and Boxing day) and also allows an extra day to be proclaimed if Christmas day lands on a Saturday - though the alternate day still isn't a Bank Holiday. Further, additional Bank Holidays can be proclaimed for special events such as Royal Jubilees, Royal Weddings etc.I B Wright (talk) 07:02, 13 May 2008 (UTC)
I'm not sure exactly what is being disputed here. Is it that Good Friday (and Christmas Day) are not Bank holidays, in which case the article states this? Or is that it is nothing to do with the Banks' non trading days, in which case that is not entirely true, though the link is pehaps a bit tenuous at best. Prior to 1871, the banks used to observe certain Saints days as non working days, but different banks recognised different Saints (presumably not unrelated to the religious persuasion of their owners).
The 1871 Act was an attempt by parliament to regularise the banks trading days so that their patrons could easily predict what days they were closed. Two recognised religious days were included (Easter Monday and Whitsun monday), as well as two non religious days (First Monday in August and Boxing Day - a term hitherto unknown, as it was known as St. Stephen's Day). The Act went further in that it was an attempt to spread the days off work to areas other than banking, though it has never been compulsory for employers to observe it. Recent legislative changes are designed to at least give employees the benefits of the (now) 8 days public holidays (only 6 of which are Bank holidays), if not the actual days themselves. Thus from October 2008, employees in the UK will be entitled to a minimum of 4 weeks holiday plus the 8 public holidays. The rules are a little more complex than this being based on hours worked, but the practical upshot is that a full time worker who works 5 days a week will be entitled to a minimum of 28 days holiday per year (8 of which may (or may not) be taken on the recognised public holidays). 86.138.56.74 (talk) 22:16, 18 May 2008 (UTC)
It was the relationship to bank non working days that is disputed. Prior to 1871, the banks (including the Bank of England) observed a lot more than 4 non working Saint's days. The article also makes no mention of the current Royal Proclamation method of nominating Bank Holidays, though briefly mentions that it is used solely to nominate alternate days to holidays landing on a weekend. This is not the case, none of the Bank Holidays are now defined in law. They are all proclaimed except Good Friday for which the arrangement has never changed since before the 1871 Act. 20.133.0.13 (talk) 12:05, 20 May 2008 (UTC)
Seems to me that this is a good example of losing one's history, by means of being overly pedantic. Spring Bank Holiday is still called Spring Bank Holiday by a large portion of people; reading this article, there is a clear statement as to what bank holidays were - including the fact that different banks once closed for different saints days, and that this no longer occurs. Even if the relationship is historical, it is not non-existent. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.5.153.203 (talk) 00:10, 25 May 2008 (UTC)
I'm not sure what you meant by "Spring Bank Holiday is still called Spring Bank Holiday by a large portion of people ...". Spring Bank Holiday is a relatively recent Holiday so it should be called this by everybody. Prior to this it was known as 'Whitsun Monday Bank Holiday' or just "Whit Monday" for short. 20.133.0.13 (talk) 14:08, 28 May 2008 (UTC)

There is no right to time off on a Bank Holiday[edit]

It says in the article that, "There is some automatic right to time off on these days..." Searching the internet reveals that this is not true (http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Employment/Employees/Timeoffandholidays/DG_10029788) It appears that there was once a right to time off on bank holidays, but UK governments appear to have legislated to remove those rights, and instead incorporate the time into the more general right to paid holiday. If anyone knows better then feel free to correct me. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.187.233.172 (talk) 15:03, 9 April 2009 (UTC)

Article seem in accurate in places[edit]

As noted above by some people there are some errors in this and also the UK / Scotland and England and Wales have different meaning and views on bank holidays and public holidays.

From http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/01/bankholidays

Q. What is the difference between a bank holiday and a public or local holiday?

A. It is important to draw a distinction between bank holidays, and public or local holidays in Scotland. As the dates for bank holidays are set out in statute or are the subject of proclamation, it follows that they are the same across the whole of Scotland. On the other hand public or local holidays in Scotland are determined by local authorities, based on local tradition (not statutory authority) and after consultation with local business interests.

There is no legal or statutory definition of public holiday in the United Kingdom and it is questionable whether public holidays exist in Scotland. The term is often confused with bank holidays. In England and Wales a bank holiday tends automatically to be a public holiday, in that the majority of people have the day off and the day is generally observed as a holiday. In Scotland this is not always the case.

Non-sensical wording in intro para?[edit]

Shouldn't the second sentence read, There is no automatic right to time off ...? The way this is phrased now doesn't seem to make sense. --ThorstenNY (talk) 18:29, 22 November 2009 (UTC)

Very confusing wording[edit]

It says in the lead "Bank holidays are often assumed to be so called because they are days upon which banks are shut, but this is not in fact the case" OK, so why are they called Bank holidays then? For want of a better explanation I assume it's the case that the term was used originally for days on which banks were closed but over time it has become used, albeit incorrectly, for other public holidays? If so, wouldn't it be better to say that rather than leave the question open as to why they are called Bank holidays? I appreciate that this has been discussed before but no clear conclusion seems to have been reached. Richerman (talk) 16:14, 4 January 2010 (UTC)

I second. If there is controversy, an explanation of the controversy and of the various points of vue (with references) would the best. Nicolas1981 (talk) 02:07, 31 August 2010 (UTC)

Bank holiday as economic emergency measure[edit]

As we can see the hate note reads: For the bank holiday declared in the USA during the Great Depression, see Emergency Banking Act. However, this phrase has been used in the past and now looking futuristically to describe a variety of govt mandated bank shut downs worldwide. Since both seem to be government mandated, I think dividing this into two sections on the two different useages would be warranted, unless the emergency-related usage got to big and then there'd have to be a disambiguation to Bank holiday (emergency measure) or something like that. CarolMooreDC 17:51, 20 January 2012 (UTC)

I think we need a clear legal definition of a bank holiday. Are banks legally required not to open on a bank holiday? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.171.29.150 (talk) 19:18, 5 April 2012 (UTC)


Religiouus Holidays vs. Political correctness?[edit]

Can it be assumed that the term Bank holiday is used to enable Muslims and other religions to have a day of on Christian holidays like Christmas? Or was it rather that banks became more powerful than the church? -> should be now changed to Standard&Poor Holiday.

No, it cannot be "assumed". The terminology "bank holiday" in the UK came into use a long time before there were any significant number of Muslims in the UK.Eregli bob (talk) 14:11, 7 January 2013 (UTC)

Hong Kong[edit]

Hong Kong has more holidays, since they have Christian holidays (Christmas, Easter), Western holidays (New Year), English holidays (Birthday of the Queen; replaced by Buddha's Birthday when China took over), and Chinese holidays (Ching Ming festival, Mid Autumn Festival).

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