Talk:Basket

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[edit]

Which technique came first, basketry or weaving? Wetman 16:56, 14 Mar 2004 (UTC)

This page needs a picture—Trevor Caira 22:41, 22 Dec 2004 (UTC)

It's got a wonderful one now! -- Chris 22:24, 1 November 2006 (UTC)

The page seems to be weighed towards describing baskets as historical or tribal objects instead of a long-lived contemporary craft. Maybe the views could be separated or made more neutral somehow?

Where did the Gift Basket Originate?[edit]

"Since the beginning of mankind, man has woven grasses, straw, twigs and branches to create baskets.
Early uses for the basket were to store dry goods and to transport food and materials.
In biblical times, larger baskets were used for transporting people and goods on the water.
Always a useful, sturdy container, it was a tool of man for tens of thousands of years."

The First American Gift Baskets

When the Mayflower landed on the shores of America, the European settlers were greeted with the first gift baskets. Dried fish and meats, corn, beans and other vegetables were presented to the settlers, by the American Indians, to welcome their arrival. In the 1700 and 1800’s, individuals created baskets full of fruits, foods and candies for Christmas, Easter and other holidays. Today’s gift baskets are crafted to the individual recipients tastes for holidays, special occasions or “just because” gift giving. Fruits, foods and candies now share space in gift baskets with “useable” items for the baby, the bath, the kitchen or for play. The baskets or boxes themselves are designed to be creatively used as well by the recipient once they’ve enjoyed the contents of the gift basket. Many baskets, of all different styles and themes, can be found at websites such as [Giftbaskey.com] and [GiftBaskets.com].


Article by: L Flynn —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Torree (talkcontribs) 12:39, 9 February 2007 (UTC).

Baskets as Art[edit]

Someone might want to tackle the issue of baskets as art, such as the following contemporary basket collections. I'm sure there are historic collections as well.

I'm upgrading the article on the Erie Art Museum in Erie, Pennsylvania. They have a contemporary basket collection as part of the permanent holdings of the museum, but it seems useless to link the article to the basket page. If I've missed the internal link to collectible art baskets, let me know.--Pat 03:14, 25 June 2007 (UTC)

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