Talk:Bell Boeing Quad TiltRotor

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Historical info[edit]

Before this article was created, text on it was on both Tiltrotor and Quadrotor. Those have since been trimmed. Much of that text was good but uncited, so it couldn't be used here directly. However, for historical purposes, I'm pasting it below:

From Tiltrotor:

Bell and Boeing have studied larger Quad Tiltrotor (QTR) military models for possible application to the US Army's Joint Heavy Lift (JHL) program. A Quad Tiltrotor is a larger four rotor version of a Tiltrotor aircraft. It has 2 sets of fixed wings and 4 tilting rotors mounted at the tips of the wings. The program has been nicknamed the V-44 Tiltrotor for the four Tiltrotor version and V-66 Tiltrotor for the six tiltrotor version. These poly-tiltrotor aircraft have also been called "The Flying Freight Train" for their large capacity almost the size of a railcar. These may carry as many as 100 passengers or troops or heavy cargo over 50,000 pounds. They would use uprated versions of the tiltrotor engines used for the V-22 Osprey. These designs have been seen in Popular Science and Popular Mechanics.

From Quadrotor:

With the Quad Tiltrotor concept, Bell seeks to capitalize on V-22 Osprey investments to develop a large payload, high speed, Vertical and/or Short Take Off and Landing (VSTOL) capability for the military within 10 years. The QTR would use V-22 propulsion and support systems: engines, rotor systems, drive train, transmission, hydraulics, electronics, and generators, except that QTR would have four engines, instead of two, mounted on fore and aft wings. The wing structure outboard of the flaperons would also be common; however the front wing would have a slightly longer span than the V-22 to accommodate the wider fuselage The rear wing would be longer than the front wing, putting the rear rotors outboard of the front rotors for higher performance and fuel economy in cruise. The front and rear propulsion systems could be interconnected for additional reliability. The glass cockpit, avionics, instruments, and threat warning systems could also be adapted directly from the V-22.
The QTR fuselage would be the size of a Lockheed Martin C-130-30 Hercules transport, and could transport a wide assortment of loads: eight 463L pallets, 90 passengers, 70 stretchers, a helicopter as large as an AH-64 Apache, a 155mm howitzer, or three HMMWVs. A rear ramp, rollers and rails would facilitate common logistics equipment used for the C-5, C-17, C-130 and C-141 loading. According to Bell, an advanced concept technology demonstrator (ACTD) could fly by 2005, with production deliveries beginning in 2010. Although it would be possible to use a modified C-130 fuselage for a demonstrator, there are very different structural requirements since the QTR has two wings versus the single wing of the Hercules. For production, lower weight and a better match for the expected payloads would be possible with a new fuselage. Although Boeing builds the V-22 fuselage, Dick Spivey, Bell's Director of Advanced Concepts, said Boeing would not necessarily be a partner on the QTR; either Bell or a subcontractor could build the fuselage. Bell has recently determined that it can eliminate the vertical tail entirely, and provide directional stability via differential rotor thrust.
The QTR would be able to deliver cargo from airfields and port facilities directly to ground maneuver units and to ships at sea, needing as little as 1/2 acre to land. The QTR would allow a practical means to transport up to 13500kg externally or 18000kg internally far from shore bases (due to its size, however, it would obviously not be able to be stowed below deck). With twice the propulsion system of the V-22, the QTR could hover at 45000kg and have a maximum weight of 63000kg; internal volume would be 6-8 times that of the V-22. Maximum unrefueled range would be 3700km and it could cruise at 520km/h.
According to Spivey, Bell has flown two V-22s in close proximity to each other, approaching the distance between the fore and aft rotor system, with no difficulties. Water tunnel tests indicate that the rotor wake from the front rotors in forward flight flow down and inboard, below and inboard the rear rotors. It should also be noted that from 1966 to 1980, some 200 flight test hours were conducted on two Bell X-22 quad tilt duct demonstrators. Using common parts with the V-22 would not only reduce the cost of the QTR, but also that of the V-22. It would allow existing support equipment, test equipment and spares pipeline to be used for both aircraft, reducing the logistics footprint. Efficiencies in maintenance and training could also be realized.
Bell is discussing the Quad Tiltrotor with the Services to define potential requirements (e.g., the Joint Transport Rotorcraft/Joint Common Lift mission), and is pursuing possible risk reduction activities with DARPA. With the QTR, the Marine Corps could deliver thousands of tons of supplies per day to forward troops without having to depend on land supply routes. The Navy could deliver of tons of supplies to carriers and even non-aviation ships while underway, without the need for a catapult or arresting gear. The Army is seeking to replace the heavy lift CH-47 Chinook helicopters it uses today with much greater capability, and is currently funding advanced rotors, transmissions and structures science and technology programs. The Air Force could supply its aerospace expeditionary forces directly from forward operating bases. Humanitarian relief, such as was needed for Central America in October 1998 after hurricane Mitch, could be greatly improved with a large heavy lift V/STOL transport. And non-combatant evacuations could be conducted from the continental US to anywhere in the world using the QTR's aerial refueling capability. For example, in a hypothetical rescue mission, a QTR could take off from Quantico Marine Corps Base in Virginia and fly to the American Embassy in Moscow with two refuelings over the North Atlantic. The QTR could then take up to 80 passengers out to a vertical recovery on an American ship in the Baltic.

Akradecki 22:27, 12 February 2007 (UTC)

Popular Mechanics[edit]

BTW, while I have included the PM article in the ELs, I have not referenced it on purpose, as the information on it was quite early, and had very little quotations, and generally seems quite speculative. I guess I'm spoiled by WP's strict standards...that article certainly doesn't live up to our WP:V and WP:CITE! Akradecki 22:55, 12 February 2007 (UTC)

removal of image[edit]

I've now removed the image twice because Boeing's license agreement is quite restrictive. It says:

This clearly is contrary to Wikipedia guidelines (Wikipedia:Fair use) which state:

Akradecki 01:25, 19 February 2007 (UTC)

Updates?[edit]

The 18 month study was supposed to end last month (March 2007). I haven't found anything new on it. Does anybody know if the study was extended or anything? Thanks. -Fnlayson 16:32, 6 April 2007 (UTC)

Joint Future Theater Lift program[edit]

Is the old program renamed or was it canceled and about to be replaced?

http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/07/army_airforce_jftl_071510w/

DoD sheds light on joint future theater lift

Hcobb (talk) 15:31, 16 July 2010 (UTC)

File:Bell Qtr.png Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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Media[edit]

In the 2011 movie Transformers 3, Dark of the Moon what appeared to be a Quad Tiltrotor made a short appearance before getting shot down. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.88.12.117 (talk) 02:50, 1 July 2011 (UTC)

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