Talk:Blaise Pascal

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Former featured article Blaise Pascal is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on August 19, 2005.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
July 25, 2005 Peer review Reviewed
August 4, 2005 Featured article candidate Promoted
September 12, 2011 Featured article review Demoted
Current status: Former featured article


images[edit]

There are too many images, and it's making this page crowded. I say we remove the stamp image, and develop a caption for the statue image. -- Removed this passage: "Following an accident in 1654 at the Neuilly bridge where the horses plunged over the parapet but the carriage miraculously survived, Pascal abandoned mathematics and physics for philosophy and theology." Source? Pascal's turn toward religion is commonly attributed to his mystical experience of Nov. 23, 1654. Mark K. Jensen 09:47, Jan 25, 2005 (UTC)

Found a source placing the accident in question 15 days before Pascal's mystical experience. [1] Mark K. Jensen 01:25, Jan 26, 2005 (UTC)

Article Direction[edit]

When searching for Pascal I was brought to an article about the Pascal physics unit. It seems obvious that the biography of a man should come before an article about a connotation in the mans honor, so I think it should direct here first.

Influenced[edit]

I think it might be relevant to add Nietzsche to the list of whom Pascal influenced. Nietzsche was practically in love with Pascal's philosophy, with one exception: his religiosity. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.41.90.234 (talk) 20:09, 16 March 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 17 April 2014[edit]

My login as a Wikipedia editor is years old, but seldom used.

I have long been a fan of the quotation about apologizing for a long letter as was time was too short to write a shorter one. I understood that this was attributed to Pascal, but it is often referenced against Mark Twain, Winston Churchill, or others. Withthe help of a reference librarian, I tracked down the quotation to Pascal's Provincial Letters, and wanted to include this attribution in this article, in the section where the letters are referenced. Specifically, after the mentions of the publication of the letters and the reactions to them I would add the following text:

"It is in the Provincial Letters that Pascal coined his oft-quoted apology for writing a long letter, as he hadn't had time to write a shorter one. From Letter XVI, as translated by Thomas M'Crie: 'Reverend fathers, my letters were not wont either to be so prolix, or to follow so closely on one another. Want of time must plead my excuse for both of these faults. The present letter is a very long one, simply because I had no leisure to make it shorter.'"

The source from which this was recovered is at http://arcticbeacon.com/docs/Pascal/Provincial_Letters_of_Blaise_Pascal.pdf

TomTheItinerant (talk) 21:23, 17 April 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done for now: Why? Also, if you make just four more edits (responding to this request is one), you'll be able to make this change yourself. — {{U|Technical 13}} (tec) 13:47, 27 April 2014 (UTC)

Theologian?[edit]

This article was removed from the theologians category, and then restored. I decided to do some digging around, and I found a number of biographical entries mention Pascal as a theologian in the heading or first sentence: [2][3][4] StAnselm (talk) 19:42, 20 December 2014 (UTC)

For the record, there has been a discussion about this question on my user page, this discussion has been settled peacefully by keeping the theologian category. Marcocapelle (talk) 12:18, 21 December 2014 (UTC)