Talk:Bletting

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WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 11:14, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

Bananas[edit]

This is also true of bananas. The popular concept of a ripe banana in a supermarket in the US is bright yellow and very hard or "firm." Bananas are shipped this way due to their fragility when ripe. They are in fact green, and it was once a common practice by importers to enclose bananas upon receiving them in an unvented room, an expose them to natural gas, which accelerates the color change in the skin from green to yellow, but leaves them still hard and hard to digest. In nature the ripening fruit generates its own "natural gas": methane. If taken home green or bright yellow, unblemished, the ripening process is finished, by those who know, often by placing the fruit in a paper (not plastic) bag, and placing of top of the refrigerator, a place providing a little heat, from the fridge compressor, but not as much heat as a gas range pilotlight (far too much). The paper bag is not air-tight, but retains much of the methane the fruit itself is generating, which expedites the ripening process. Bananas are not truly ripe until they have black spots, or, some would say, until fully black. By and large the North American public would consider these bananas spoiled, or rotten. Eating bananas green is the cause of widespread complaints that they are hard to digest. Rags (talk) 16:59, 1 October 2015 (UTC)