Talk:Blown flap

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A380 flaps[edit]

"The Airbus A380, because of its massive size, is one of the few major commercial airliners to use externally blown flaps, which continue behind its engines."

This statement just doesn't seem right, even though it is sourced. Massive size by itself doesn't require a powered lift system. I don't believe the more massive AN-225 has one.

There would be certification issues for large civil jet aircraft with powered lift (see NASA TN D-4261 on the Boeing 707 powered lift tests).

"one of the few" what are the others?

Flaps behind engines doesn't mean they are blown. eg A320/330/340 all have flaps behind engines.

But more importantly, for this deletion, A380 flap system info in these Airbus reports does not support the statement. "Aerodynamic Design of Airbus High-Lift Wings in a Multidisciplinary Environment" by Reckzeh. Figure 10 shows pressure distribution with high-lift elements deployed very similar A340/380.

"Aerodynamic Design of Airbus High Lift Wings" by Reckzeh. Page 22 shows engine exhaust doesn't scrub wing lower surface. Also says if exhaust touched even just trailing edge of flap it would create challenges.Pieter1963 (talk) 23:56, 27 November 2015 (UTC)

"Blown flaps invented by the British"[edit]

Can anyone cite this? If not I will delete it because I've not found any source/patent in the course of doing the recent addition to "History" I think there may be BLC experiments using suction which it may refer to as opposed to blown flaps.Pieter1963 (talk) 00:18, 4 December 2015 (UTC)