Talk:Book censorship in the United States

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'Suggestions

First sentence is very biased

Who considers “the suppression of books” objectionable, harmful, sensitive, or inconvenient (That is not what this says, it says they are suppressed because of these reasons)

Third sentence no citation provided

Reasons for Censorship “citation after first sentence”

Expand on Reasons for censorship Give more of a definition to the three main reasons for censorship

List of censored books is unnecessary and doesn’t have an information that is insightful or helpful at all

Specific cases: Need to provide both sides of the book censorship and much more context and be more consistent with citing

Evaluating the article: Warning banner at the top signals that there are clear issues in this article, including content gaps, insufficient information to help people who are newcomers to the topic, biased language, missing citations for information that is clearly not original content.

Suggestions for edits of this article: Reasons for Censorship section could include analyses from Brandt, Miller, etc., about why books are censored and how children are perceived.

In the introduction, want to include definitions that differ the meanings of "censorship", "challenging", and "banning" of books.

Discuss and define who the censors of many books in specific cases are, but also more generally.

Create a section about "Activism against Censorship" and discuss the ALA, etc. Shirshorn (talk) 17:29, 2 November 2016 (UTC)Shirshorn

First sentence of article shows extreme bias. Second sentence is grammatically incorrect. Re-organize intro section to better show neutral explanations of what book censorship is.

Reason for censorship section should be expanded and definitions more clear. Expanded, more structured book censorship list. Use examples of books from class to include in the "specific examples" section. (Catcher in the Rye example is well written and a well known controversy, while Mummy Laid an Egg is not well known and pretty ineffectual to informing the reader.

Citations needed for last seven examples in "Specific Examples" section. Add links to graphs, lists, etc. to ALA as a way to visually inform the reader to examples of book censorship. Chrismulterer (talk) 17:39, 2 November 2016 (UTC)Chrismulterer

Changes that I want to make (shirshorn) -Find a court case (Supreme Court, if possible), which details the legality of censorship in the United States to be added to the "background" section. -Add a new section with statistics and numbers of book challenges across the country; maybe included in the list of books or adapted to include this? (Need to think of a title for the new section, if a completely new one should be created). -Choose 5-10 good examples of books that are consistently censored. Give the reasons for challenges, specific examples of the challenges, and how the challenges have been met. A good example could include Catcher in the Rye. -In the "Reasons for Censorship" section, include reasons from both the perpetrators of censorship, as well as it's opposition, to remain neutral throughout the article. (Consult more conservative information sources and their reviews on a book being censored). -Update the list of the books that have been censored and include the criteria that is decided upon on how these books were compiled, ex) how often they are censored, how recently, etc.

What do others think about focusing on a few books and highlighting the controversies they have faced? It feels slightly limiting, but also helpful in the sense that the topic is so broad, and this may help to give some guidance and concrete examples to the readers about how censorship plays out and its benefits or drawbacks... Shirshorn (talk) 19:41, 12 November 2016 (UTC)shirshorn

Shirshorn (talk) 19:42, 12 November 2016 (UTC)shirshorn

DylanFine7777777- Changes to the article I would give more background on the history of book censorship. This topic dates back to pre-revolutionary war America, so I would just mentioned how this subject was originally brought up. This will allow the reader to observe and compare cases of the distant past to current cases. I would go into much more detail on the specific cases. You do a pretty good job with "Catcher in the Rye" but once again avoid harsh language. You need to give more context than merely stating a book appeared on so and so's list. Here are some sources that I think will aid this article.

Each specific case should be about a paragraph long, not a few sentences. I think it would be more helpful to the reader if the article focused more on the reasons for book censorship rather than specific cases. I also think the list of censored books is unnecessary as this list will need to updated constantly and currently does not list all of the censored books in American History. Here are some sources that I think should help. 1. Boyer, Paul S. “Boston Book Censorship in the Twenties.” American Quarterly, vol. 15, no. 1, 1963, pp. 3–24. www.jstor.org/stable/2710264.

2. Boyer, Paul S. “Gilded-Age Consensus, Repressive Campaigns, and Gradual Liberalization: The Shifting Rhythms of Book Censorship.” A History of the Book in America: Volume 4: Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940, Edited by Carl F. Kaestle and Janice A. Radway, University of North Carolina Press, 2009, pp. 276–298, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469625829_kaestle.21.

3. Detty, Elizabeth W. The Legal Aspects of Censorship of Public School Library And Instructional Materials, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Ann Arbor: ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 1981.

4. Foerstel, Herbert N. Banned in the U.S.A.: A Reference Guide to Book Censorship in Schools and Public Libraries. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1994.

5. Judith, and Haydel Judith. "Right of School Boards to Ban Books." The Encyclopedia of Civil Liberties in America, edited by Schultz , David and John R. Vile, Routledge, 2005. Credo Reference, https://proxy.library.georgetown.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com.proxy.library.georgetown.edu/content/entry/sharpecla/right_of_school_boards_to_ban_books/0. Accessed 13 Nov 2016.

6. Tarr, C. A. ""Censorship in Children's Literature", Para.doxa: Studies in World Literary Genres 2.3-4 (1996), and: What Johnny Shouldn't Read: Textbook Censorship in America (review)." The Lion and the Unicorn, vol. 22 no. 2, 1998, pp. 244-250. Project MUSE, doi:10.1353/uni.1998.0021.

Chrismulterer (talk) 02:38, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

kittencrew- This article is at a bare bones state, having barly enough information to even make it an article. I would recommend that it has a larger introduction section, in which talks about different places a book can be banned, who is able to ban books, and introduces some of the controversy about banning books. Next I would recommend that addition of a history section outlining the origins of book banning in the United States and some of the thoughts about it throughout history. Next I would remove the section that discusses titles of banned books, but provides no other details. This section, would never be adequate or would be entirely too long. Lastly I would beef up the list of books that were challenged and some of the history behind those cases. I like the idea and perhaps focusing on the top ten banned books of all times might be a help to provide a good overview without diving into all books that were ever challenged. Also it is important to discuss why some of the books listed under the cases section were banned. These are a few sources (newspaper articles and scholarly articles) that I think might be of use when expanding this article:

Kittencrew (talk) 04:24, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

I think that a way to decide which books to include on the specific cases and which ones we would go into depth discussing could be the books that are most frequently banned in the past 3 decades. This would focus our research but also show how the types of books that get censored tends to change over time and the causes for the censorship change as well. Shirshorn (talk) 15:18, 16 November 2016 (UTC)shirshorn

Possible References[edit]

[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]

  1. ^ Muncy, Mitchell (25 September 2009). "Finding Censorship Where There Is None". Wall Street Journal. 
  2. ^ Boyer, Paul S. “Boston Book Censorship in the Twenties.” American Quarterly, vol. 15, no. 1, 1963, pp. 3–24. JSTOR 2710264 gives a detailed background on a lot of the books that were banned during the 1920s in Boston
  3. ^ Boyer, Paul S. “Gilded-Age Consensus, Repressive Campaigns, and Gradual Liberalization: The Shifting Rhythms of Book Censorship.” A History of the Book in America: Volume 4: Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880–1940, Edited by Carl F. Kaestle and Janice A. Radway, University of North Carolina Press, 2009, pp. 276–298, JSTOR 10.5149/9781469625829_kaestle
  4. ^ Detty, Elizabeth W. The Legal Aspects of Censorship of Public School Library And Instructional Materials, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Ann Arbor: 1981. ISBN 978-0-87215-556-5
  5. ^ Foerstel, Herbert N. Banned in the U.S.A.: A Reference Guide to Book Censorship in Schools and Public Libraries. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1994. ISBN 978-0-313-31166-6
  6. ^ Judith, and Haydel Judith. "Right of School Boards to Ban Books." The Encyclopedia of Civil Liberties in America, edited by Schultz , David and John R. Vile, Routledge, 2005. Via Credo Reference, Accessed 13 Nov 2016. ISBN 978-0-415-94342-0
  7. ^ Tarr, C. A. ""Censorship in Children's Literature", Para.doxa: Studies in World Literary Genres 2.3-4 (1996), and: What Johnny Shouldn't Read: Textbook Censorship in America (review)." The Lion and the Unicorn, vol. 22 no. 2, 1998, pp. 244-250. doi:10.1353/uni.1998.0021
  8. ^ "The Banning of Books." Wall Street Journal, New York, N.Y., 1954. (This is pretty vague, a whole year of WSJ).
  9. ^ Colin C. "Book Banning in America." New York Times, New York, N.Y., 1981.
  10. ^ Narayanaswamy, R., & Weaver, K. D. (2015). The Impact of Information and Communication Technologies on Book Challenge Trends in the United States: An Analysis. Webology, 12(2), 1. Via Research Gate.
  11. ^ Padmanabhan, Jaya. "Banning Books." India Currents, vol. 25, no. 3, 2011., pp. 10-13.
  12. ^ Bald, Margaret,. Literature Suppressed on Religious Grounds. New York, NY: Facts on File, 2011. ISBN 978-0-8160-8230-8
  13. ^ Karolides, Nicholas J., Bald, Margaret., Sova,Dawn B.,. 120 Banned Books : Censorship Histories of World Literature. New York, NY: Facts on File, Inc., 2011. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2
  14. ^ Karolides, Nicholas J.,. Literature Suppressed on Political Grounds. New York, NY: Facts on File, 2011 ISBN 978-0-8160-8231-5
  15. ^ Sova, Dawn B.,. Literature Suppressed on Sexual Grounds. New York, NY: Facts on File, 2006. ISBN 978-0-8160-6272-0
  16. ^ Censorship. (2011). Keywords for children's literature (). New York, NY, USA: New York University Press. ISBN 978-0-8147-5855-7
  17. ^ Foerstel, H. N.,. (1997). Free expression and censorship in america : An encyclopedia. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-29231-6
  18. ^ Hart, J. (2006, Oct 23). Novels too graphic for some – hot publishing trend of comic book-type images draws objections from some library patrons. Kansas City Star, the (MO), pp. B4. Via ProQuest


Added section on reasons for censorship Chrismulterer (talk) 18:19, 4 December 2016 (UTC)

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