Talk:Border Reivers

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"Reiver" and "bereave"[edit]

I have removed this ridiculous claim:

The reivers also left us with the term "bereave", a telling reflection of the violent nature of much of their activity.

"Bereave" has been an English word since Anglo-Saxon times (the Old English original was berēafian). In the original sense, it meant "deprive of", which could include possession and money. In its modern sense, the meaning has become restricted to "deprive of a spouse".

So the word "reiver" and "bereave" are undoubtedly linked; however, "reiver" comes from the older more general sense of the word "bereave", not the other way around. --Saforrest 16:18, 12 June 2006 (UTC)

One of the problems with this article is that it is rather incomplete, I grew up in Northumberland and was taught a lot of this history (a long time ago), the reavers or reivers surely are connected to piracy. I seem to remember that the Riddley's and the Armstrong's were both once river pirates (on the Tyne) - that the aristocracy of Northumberland themselves had obtained much of their wealth originally from piracy - and the dates all go back I think to as early as the 800's.
Trouble is its all confused - I suppose I could try to find out more from a local historian. - Maybe could put some of it here if wanted, the problem as always is finding references. - I know that a lot of Northumberland's oral history is recorded but generally in very obscure, hard to find, small run books.
- My real question was on the status and history of the word Reaver itself, was it an old name for pirate, what groups of pirates is it connected to etc. - Its research I need for a book. - thanks. Lucien86 (talk) 08:58, 17 August 2008 (UTC)

POV[edit]

This article is dripping with POV, and there are no sources cited for any claims. Dave420 16:47, 23 January 2007 (UTC)

The only book I have read about the subject, "The Steel Bonnets" is mentioned at the bottom of the article. It is fairly comprehensive. The article rings true to what I remember from reading the book some years ago. rossnixon 11:34, 15 September 2007 (UTC)

Comprehensive, maybe, but is that book a reliable source? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.215.5.35 (talk) 12:49, 12 March 2009 (UTC)

Battle of Pinkie[edit]

I have been reading a book by Alistair Moffat called "The reivers" which states at the beginning of chapter 2 that the Scottish and English borderers were talking to each other in the midst of the battle and when spotted put on a show of fighting each other! I have been looking for other sources for this but could'nt find any.I think this would be a good addition to the article but would'nt want to add it for reasons already given!Any ideas?--Jack forbes (talk) 20:47, 11 March 2008 (UTC)P.S I have gone ahead and added it anyway.--Jack forbes (talk) 01:34, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Law and Order[edit]

I have inserted a reference to the sleuth hound and a link in the law section. What is said here seems to relate to the law of 'hot trod'--Cleanboot (talk) 13:49, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

Murderers[edit]

The Border Reivers were murderers. - 81.156.6.170 (talk) 23:13, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

...and blackmailers and thieves... So what's your point? Eastcote (talk) 17:00, 21 December 2008 (UTC)

Surnames[edit]

There are two lists of surnames in this article. One is only Scottish Surnames from the 1597 Scottish Roll of Borders and Highland Surnames. The other has both English and Scottish surnames as compiled by George MacDonald Fraser in The Steel Bonnets. Please do not add names to these lists of surnames, as these are specific, referenced lists. If you wish to add a surname to the article, please do so to another part of the article. And please provide a citation that identifies the surname as one of the historic Reiver surnames. Thanks. Eastcote (talk) 11:55, 14 September 2009 (UTC)

English officers[edit]

Many English officers were from southern counties in England and often could not command the loyalty or respect of their locally-recruited subordinates or the local population.

The sentence is far too simplistic and misleading as it implies that families like the Percies anf the Nevilles did not exist. -- PBS (talk) 00:58, 23 July 2010 (UTC)

I think the sentence itself is fine. It is true that "many" English officers were not from the Borders. What it needs is the addition of such as the Percies and Nevilles as notable exceptions. Eastcote (talk) 02:03, 23 July 2010 (UTC)