Talk:Breastfeeding

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Former featured article Breastfeeding is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on October 22, 2004.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
October 13, 2004 Featured article candidate Promoted
June 3, 2006 Featured article review Demoted
Current status: Former featured article
edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Breastfeeding:

adding to section on Breastfeeding in Public[edit]

Hi folks. My name is Amanda and I am a student at the University of Washington. I'm in the process of editing this page to add to the already existing section on public breastfeeding. These are a few of the resources I've located that I am finding to be useful. If anyone else has suggestions or feedback, do let me know. I hope to have my new content posted in the coming weeks!


External links modified[edit]

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Alcohol[edit]

This ref says "There's some evidence that regularly drinking more than two units of alcohol a day while breastfeeding may affect your baby's development. But an occasional drink is unlikely to harm your breastfed baby. It's recommended that breastfeeding mothers have no more than one or two units of alcohol once or twice a week."[1]

Thus we say "Smoking, limited amounts of alcohol, or coffee are not reasons to avoid breastfeeding." Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 21:47, 17 April 2017 (UTC)

The other sources in the article at a little more clear on that the alcohol itself is negligible (essentially far lower than many foodstuffs deemed absolutely non-alcoholic). However the lack of judgement that may come with alcohol-consumption is notable. I wonder if we could write this in the lede is some way... Carl Fredrik talk 00:05, 18 April 2017 (UTC) 
Not sure what you mean? We say some alcohol is okay with continued breast feeding. Is a lot okay? Some harm has been found with a lot. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 00:46, 18 April 2017 (UTC)

Needs further work[edit]

Extended content

Feminism in breastfeeding[edit]

Ethics[edit]

In Muers’ article entitled “The Ethics of Breastfeeding”, she sets out to “challenge the individualization of responsibility, and of the attendant guilt” that results from current arguments and social attitude towards breastfeeding.[1] The action being the mother’s choice burdens the woman into deciding whether to conform with “a prescribed standard of good mothering” and feel guilty for even considering to choose something is often labeled as unhealthy.[1]

However, Benoit’s article highlights not the importance of breastfeeding in regards to the child’s needs but rather in terms of the woman’s decision, or lack thereof due to a “society whose values are predominantly defined by men”.[2] Women who breastfeed, especially in public space, are often looked upon with disgust and disapproval regardless of the naturalness of breastfeeding. But this distaste is not because of the crude stigma modern society has developed about nudity but is instead about the “desexualization” of the female body when breastfeeding.[2] A patriarchally imposed oppression would not approve of a different use for an otherwise sexual part of the female anatomy than the use predetermined by said overarching opposition. And while this is understood socially, such an aggressive attitude towards women can only be practiced through politics. Muers writes that “infant feeding… is [a] key instance of the ‘personal’ within women’s lives that needs to be [re]named as ‘political’”.[1]

Although, the medical importance of breastfeeding cannot be underscored. Scholar Lisa H. Amir recognizes the need to increase breastfeeding rates yet notes that acknowledging “social circumstances [can] improve our understanding of infant feeding” as it directly relates to the feminist ideology behind making the decision to breastfeed.[3] In recent years, this decision has been either praised or refuted based on “the baby’s behavior” and whether it is “well fed, satisfied, settled, and gaining weight”.[3] In other words, social approval depends how the baby appears to society instead of what the woman feels is the right course of action to take. This places an unfair question on the woman’s morality and ethical outlook, reducing the woman to acting on a decision out of selfishness.

Woman's voice[edit]

Bernice Hausman explains that arguments advocating for breastfeeding as an alternative to formula “turn on...whether science can tell us that women should breastfeed”[4] because of the obvious suppression of a feminist approach. What she implies is that the focus of the argument is warped—the social structure that “impedes women’s freedoms” is the question that is hiding behind the debate over the “value of breastfeeding”.[4]

There is another layer of breastfeeding that is often overlooked that regards the physical sensations and emotional feelings that naturally arise from breastfeeding. From her studies and experiments, Charlotte Faircloth has concluded that the subjects that were supportive of the action felt as though what they were doing was right because it felt right.[5] She learned that some mothers felt such a strong bond with the child that it triggered a profound reaction within themselves as women, a truth that was often “indescribable”.[5] But her main point stems from this conclusion: whether it is moral and feminist simply because the emotional response received is a pleasurable one.

References

  1. ^ a b c Muers, Rachel (Spring 2010). "The Ethics of Breastfeeding". Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion. 26 (1): 8. 
  2. ^ a b Benoit, Britney; Goldberg, Lisa; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha (2015). "Infant Feeding and Maternal Guilt: The Application of Feminist Phonological Framework to Guide Clinician Practices in Breast Feeding Promotion". Journal of Women, Politics & Policy. 34: 59. 
  3. ^ a b Amir, Lisa H. (2011). "Social theory and infant feeding". International Breastfeeding Journal. 6: 1. 
  4. ^ a b Hausman, Bernice (2013). "Breastfeeding, Rhetoric and the Politics of Feminism". Journal of Women, Politics & Policy. 34: 331. 
  5. ^ a b Faircloth, Charlotte (2013). "What Feels Right: Affect, Emotion, and the Limitations of Infant-Feeding Policy". Journal of Women, Politics & Policy. 34: 350. 
Stuff like "But her main point stems from this conclusion: whether it is moral and feminist simply because the emotional response received is a pleasurable one." appears to be original research unless she says "My main point is"
Not seeing this as encyclopedic in tone. This sources are not really overviews of the topic in question but the opinions of single people (ie primary sources). Others thoughts. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 16:37, 1 May 2017 (UTC)
This was written as a student assignment. I left a message on the editor's talk page at User talk:Iihiimarii in hopes of some improvement but the editor has not edited since. I think the whole section should be removed.
This is a real and interesting topic. It could well be a section or an entire article in itself. But this student essay is misleading and does not begin to cover this complex topic. StarryGrandma (talk) 18:22, 1 May 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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